Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 755 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 151 to 165 of 755:

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TitleAct of council, regulating the manner of carrying chairs.
Imprint[Edinburgh]
Date of Publication1749
LanguageEnglish
NotesIn modern times, local government concerns itself with seemingly banal regulations concerning parking, litter or public lighting. There is nothing new in this - perceived 'over regulation' was alive and well in Edinburgh over 250 years ago, as this broadside demonstrates. The city authorities were forced into action to ask 'chairmen' - those who carried sedan chairs and their occupants around the city - to ensure their chairs had 'a light fixed upon one of the fore-poles of the chair'. This apparently followed a number of incidents resulting in 'many hurts and inconveniences that have happened to the inhabitants & by the chairmen carrying or resting their chairs without lights under cloud of night'. Furthermore all chairs had to be numbered. If these regulations were not followed, chairmen faced being fined a shilling, imprisonment, loss of hire and the chair impounded! The first sedan chairs for public hire were introduced into Edinburgh in 1687. Horse drawn coaches were often unsuited to the narrow closes and steep hills of Edinburgh's Old Town. In 1687 there were only 6 chairs available but by 1779 there were 180 hackney-chairs and 50 private chairs in Edinburgh. The table of fairs introduced in the regulation dated 1738, referred to in this broadside, specified 6d a trip within the city, 4s for a whole day's rental, and 1s 6d for a journey of half a mile outside town. The majority of the chairmen were Highlanders and this was reflected in the use of tartan for their uniforms.
ShelfmarkRB.m.672
Acquired on14/07/08
Title[Theatre programme for two plays: 1. My son-in law 2: The frogs]
Imprint[Edinburgh: privately printed]
Date of Publication[1873]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a rare theatre programme specially printed for the performance of two plays at the home of (Henry Charles) Fleeming Jenkin (1833-1885) on May 3,5 and 6 1873. In 1868 Jenkin had become Professor of Engineering at Edinburgh University, where he encountered and befriended the young student Robert Louis Stevenson, then studying engineering. Jenkin was a man of great learning and wide interests. His home theatricals at 5 Fettes Row in Edinburgh's New Town became events in the Edinburgh social calendar. This programme was for a performance of a French comedy ("Le gendre de M. Poirier" by Emile Augier), specially translated for the occasion, followed by an English-language version of the ancient Greek comedy "The frogs". Among the cast of actors for the two plays were Jenkin, Robert Louis Stevenson and the Edinburgh-based artist/illustrator William Hole who later illustrated many of Stevenson's works. In his "Memoir of Fleeming Jenkin", first published in 1887, two years after Jenkin's death, Stevenson reminisced fondly about his amateur dramatics as part of Jenkin's company.
ShelfmarkAP.3.208.15
Reference SourcesDNB; RL Stevenson "Memoir of Fleeming Jenkin"
Acquired on18/07/08
TitleThe wanderer or surprizing escape
ImprintDublin: J. Kinnier
Date of Publication1747
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an unrecorded edition of this work on the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. Another Dublin edition was printed by William Brien and Richard James also in 1747. Editions were also published in London (two by Jacob Robinson in 1747) and Glasgow (1752). It demonstrates the interest there was throughout Britain and Ireland in the rebellion and its aftermath and the continuing war of words between the different sides after decisive result at Culloden.This work is essentially a criticism of the Young Pretender’s actions as described in Ralph Griffith’s ‘Ascanius, or the Young Adventurer’ (London, 1746). In Griffith’s work, the Pretender is compared to the son of Priam wandering after the fall of Troy. It is interesting to note that the frontispiece of the Pretender is based very closely on that which appeared in Griffith’s work. Here the anonymous author gives a factual and much less dewy-eyed account of what had happened.The printer Joshua Kinnier was also a papermaker and publisher who was in business in Dublin from about 1743 until at least 1767. He died in 1777. Although there is an extensive entry under his name in the ‘Dictionary of members of the Dublin Book Trade 1550-1800’, this work is not mentioned.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2598
Reference SourcesM. Pollard. Dictionary of members of the Dublin Book Trade 1550-1800
Acquired on04/04/05
TitleThe Poster: an illustrated monthly chronicle
ImprintLondon [various printers]
Date of Publication1898-1900
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe five volumes of this rare periodical contain numerous attractive plates of contemporary posters, some in colour. There are articles relating to artists and printers, reviews of exhibitions and movements in fashion, design and collecting. Writing on advertisements and other forms of ephemera is also included. Posters have traditionally been neglected in library collections: they are hard to store and conserve, inconvenient to issue to readers and difficult to catalogue using systems designed for books. With the advent of digitisation, however, poster collections are starting to become accessible in new ways. This is an important periodical to acquire, as it gives extensive information about the art of the poster during some of its golden years. Hopefully it will be useful to those researching the poster and the bibliography of related arts.
ShelfmarkDJ.s.906
Acquired on02/03/05
TitleIn Ruhleben Camp, No.1, June 6th 1915 - No.9, October 1915, Xmas number, 1915 and The Ruhleben Bye-Election, July 1915 [subsequently The Ruhleben Camp Magazine, Volume I, No.1, March 1916 - No.4, August 1916 & Volume II, No.5, Xmas 1916 - No. 6, June 1917].
ImprintBerlin, J. S. Preuss
Date of Publication1915-1917
LanguageEnglish
NotesContents of In Ruhleben Camp: No.1, Sunday, June 6th 1915; No.2, Sunday, June 27th 1915; No.3, Sunday, July 11th 1915; No.4, August Bank Holiday Number 1915; No. 5, August 15th 1915; No.6, August 29th 1915; No.7, September 12th 1915; No.8, September 1915; No.9, October 1915; Xmas Number 1915; The Ruhleben Bye-Election, July 1915. Contents of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine: Volume I, No.1, March 1916; No.2, Spring Number, April 1916; No.3, Spring Number, May 1916; No.4, Summer Number, August 1916; Volume II, No.5, Xmas 1916; No.6, Summer Number, June 1917. At the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, there were approximately 5 000 British subjects living in Germany. Along with the crews of several merchant ships either captured at sea, or trapped in German harbours, they were detained in an internment camp - a racecourse at Ruhleben by the town of Spandau, which was then on the outskirts of Berlin. After enduring very primitive conditions when the camp was first opened in 1914, they were able to enjoy a few of the comforts of pre-war life; indeed, the internees began to manage their own affairs with no objection from the Germans, who strictly adhered to the Geneva Convention. Letters, books, sports equipment, craft material and when a printing press was allowed into the camp, this led to the production of the above two journals. These journals give an insight into how the internees, or 'campers' as they referred to themselves, tried to re-create normal civilian life. Numerous advertisements are included, from tailors, shoemakers, carpenters and barbers to language instructors, Japanese laundry, watchmakers and even a bookshop. Sports results and reports are also well represented, with football, rugby, cricket and golf being the most popular. Dramatic reviews, poetry, short stories and cartoons also featured, as did coverage of the election they held in July 1915. One feature of the camp was its own postal system, the Ruhleben Express Delivery (RXD), which issued its own stamps, but which was replaced by the camp authorities in 1916 by a less popular stamp-less service.
ShelfmarkDJ.s.807(1) and DJ.s.806
Acquired on28/06/01
TitleMemento mori
ImprintEdinburgh: Alexander Alison
Date of Publication[1738]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an interesting piece of printed ephemera from mid-18th century Edinburgh. In Britain printed funeral invitations - called burial letters - are known from at least the late seventeenth century. Many, like this, exhort the reader to 'Memento mori' - remember that you must die. Usually printers would produce ready-printed non-specific invitations on which the name of the deceased and the time and place of the funeral would be entered by hand. Mr. Simson must have reasonably well-off to have been able to afford to have his invitations fully printed . These invitations were usually hand-delivered by servants or people specially employed for the task. In large burghs delivering such letters became a recognized occupation. Woodcut invitations such as this tended to use stock narrative or allegorical compositions. The images - the grim reaper, the skull and crossbones, the cortege - relate not only to the death of the person in question but also as reminder of one's own mortality. Little is known of David Simson apart from the fact that he was employed in the legal profession. The Library holds another example of such woodcut imagery (without letterpress but in manuscript) at APS.el.150.
ShelfmarkAPS.2.205.005
Reference SourcesLlewellyn, Nigel, The art of death. (London, V&A, 1991) GME.1/20 Hatches, matches and despatches: catalogue of exhibition held at General Register House 1996-97. GRP.1999.2.4 Gordon, Anne. Death is for the living. (Edinburgh, 1984) H4.84.2025
Acquired on06/09/04
TitleCabinet of curiosities (No. I-IX)
ImprintLondon : Printed for the booksellers
Date of Publication1795
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe "London Corresponding Society" was a radical society which sought political reform, inspired by the ideals of the French Revolution. It was founded in January 1792 by a group of friends, including a Scottish radical, Thomas Hardy (1752-1832). In the same year the Scottish political reformer Thomas Muir (1765-1799) helped to set up the "Association of the Friends of the People in Edinburgh". The "Cabinet of curiosites" is a miscellany containing prose, and some poetry, relating to members of the above reform societies arrested on charges of high treason. ESTC identifies only one other copy in the UK of nos. I-VII. This copy includes two additional parts. No.VIII contains a verse, "The petition of the clerks and apprentices of writers to the Signet and writers in Edinburgh". No. IX contains part of a letter by Muir "Extract of a letter from Mr. Muir to a friend in London, Sidney, December 13, 1794". Muir was arrested on a charge of sedition and transported to Botany Bay along with three other radicals. Among these reformers known as the "Scottish martyrs" was Thomas Fyshe Palmer (1747-1802), whose letter to Mr. Jeremiah Joyce describing life in Australia is also published in No. IX.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2766(1)
Reference SourcesOxford DNB; bookseller's catalogue
Acquired on30/09/09
TitlePennsylvania Packet, and Daily Advertiser for Saturday December 5, 1789
ImprintPhiladelphia: John Dunlap and David C. Claypoole
Date of Publication1789
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis single issue of the Pennsylvania Packet contains an advertisement for the first American edition of Adam Smith's Enquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, which was printed for and sold by Thomas Dobson, Second Street, Philadelphia in three volumes, price £1-2-6. 'The superior merit of this interesting Work is universally acknowledged where the Book itself is known ... The Publisher flattered himself he should perform an acceptable service to the generous and discerning Public, by presenting to them an Elegant American Edition of this Work at this important period - Printed on a superfine paper and good type, handsomely bound and lettered, at not more than one half the price for which the London Edition can be imported and sold.' While many American libraries hold copies of Dobson's edition, the National Library is one of only two British institutions recorded in ESTC as possessing a copy (shelfmark RB.s.1408). Dobson was born in Scotland but emigrated to Philadelphia. Best known for publishing the first American edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, he also published other books by Scottish authors such as Robert Burns.
ShelfmarkRB.l.256
Reference SourcesRobert D. Arner: Dobson's Encyclopaedia : the publisher, text, and publication of America's first Britannica, 1789-1803 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991)
Acquired on12/08/09
Title[69 execution broadsides]
Imprintvarious
Date of Publication1754-c.1850
LanguageEnglish
NotesA collection of 69 broadsides dating from 1754 to around 1850, all but five of which are almost certainly printed in Scotland. Most are printed in Glasgow but there are some from Edinburgh, with others most likely printed in Stirling, Perth and Ayr. The content is almost exclusively 'gallows literature' - accounts of executions and 'last speeches and dying confessions'. Highlights include the 'Last Speech and Dying Words of Robert Campbell, alias Drummond, alias Macgregor, alias Rob Roy', son of Rob Roy McGregor (1754) and a supposed account of the murder of William Hare a mere three months after the execution of his accomplice William Burke (1829). Hare actually survived until 1859. Of the 69, 59 are unique and a further 9 are known only as single copies. Surprisingly many of these executions are not recorded in Alex Young's Encyclopaedia of Scottish executions (1998), so this may be the only source we have for some of these cases.
ShelfmarkRB.l.238(1-69)
Acquired on17/12/07
Author-
TitleHow true Christiane liberfie [sic] consisteth in the true service of God, and not to doe what each one listeth, as our carnall gospellers wold have it so be. [with:] A treatise shewing how the sarifice [sic] of the Holy Masse the worthie receiving of Christs bodie in the holy Sacrment [sic] the power to remite sinnes giuen to Churchmen, the praying to Saints halpe all good Chrsitians to Saluation aginst the Co[m]mon dotrine of the Proaestants [sic], which affirne that all the faithfull are Saued by only faith in the blood of Christ with a probation of purgatorie and holy images. A Rouen. Prentet in the Prent Hous of Marin Michel. 1614.
ImprintA Rouen, prentet in the Prent Hous of Marin Michel.
Date of Publication1614
LanguageEnglish / Scots
NotesThese are two extremely rare works bound in one volume which provide evidence about the continuing life of the Scottish Catholic community, fifty years after the Reformation had been legally established in this country. The first work is only known from this copy, and so it seems appropriate to give a description of its contents here. The text is divided into two parts. The first section presents the Catholic interpretation of 'true Christian liberty'; how the merits of Christ's redeeming sacrifice, obtained through receiving the sacraments, allow believers to be freed from subjection to sin and the Devil, and to live a life of charity and good works. The second section describes the Protestant understanding of Christian liberty in critical terms. Protestants, the writer argues, believe their liberty consists in not having to obey the law of God, because they have faith instead. The writer argues that Protestants consider that they can live as wickedly as they like and still expect to receive eternal salvation. They have disregard for the laws of civil society as well as for the laws of God. The writer cites the writings of Luther and Calvin to support his points. Ultimately, he claims, the Protestant's 'liberty' is slavery to Satan. He goes on to give some amusing (if improbable!) examples of Protestant liberty in action. He gives the example of a young woman asking her Protestant minister 'yf she with saue conscience might play the wanton', and the minister being obliged to reply that 'she may passe hir time with any young man she liketh best prouiding she doe the tourne quyetly without slaunder, because she is not bound in conscience to keepe the commandement of God where it is said: Thou shalt not commit adulterie, by reason of the libertie of the their Gospell'. The work ends with a sadly incomplete copy of a poem, supposedly from Martin Luther to Katherine Bora, the ex-nun whom he married. It includes the lines 'A whit I doe not caire of heauen or hell / Prouydiing in thy fauour I may duell'. The text is available in facsimile published by the Scolar Press (Ser.49.207). The second work is known from one other copy, at the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris. It is a calmer defence of various points of Catholic doctrine, particularly the Mass, the sacraments, prayers to the saints, purgatory and holy images. The two works may well have been issued together. They are both in octavo gathered in fours, from the press of the Rouen printer Marin Michel. They are two of only three works in English / Scots produced by this press (see STC vol. III p. 254). The other work was published the following year: this is A shorte declaration of the lives and doctrinde [sic] of the Protestants and puritans, STC 20451, known in three copies only (British Library, Edinburgh University and Folger, and available on Early English Books Online (EEBO)). This work accuses the Protestant leaders of various immoralities. In particular, John Knox is arraigned for committing 'horrible incest' and using necromancy to seduce a noble lady. The writer makes it clear that he is Scottish, describing how he was told about Knox's life by a lady in Edinburgh. Other fantastic tales of Scottish ministers follow. There can be little doubt that all three works were written or compiled by the same Scottish Catholic writer. There are numerous distinctively Scottish spellings such as 'pairte', 'Magistrat', 'prent'. The only other clue to the author's identity is the initials 'I.P.' which sign the prefatory address to the second work. English recusant works printed on the Continent are fairly well-known and documented; the much smaller number of works with a Scottish connection is much less-well studied. Like other recusant publications, these texts contain interesting ideas, but the extravagant abuse levelled at the Protestants seems unlikely to have won them many converts. It is interesting to note that in the year of publication, 1614, the Jesuit John Ogilvie (eventually canonised) was carrying out his missionary work in Scotland, leading up to his martyrdom in 1615. This volume has recently been dispersed from the library of Prinknash Abbey, a Benedictine monastery in Gloucestershire, England. It has different Prinknash bookplates inside the front and rear boards. It is bound in contemporary limp vellum, with a gilt flower ornament stamped in the centre of each cover. The volume is imperfect. It is stained throughout, most notably obscuring the text on the first title page. The first work has damage to leaf F3 and lacks leaf F4, which would have completed the poem mentioned above; the second work has some text missing on D2, E1 and K3, and is apparently missing a blank leaf at the end - the text ends with 'Finis' and an apologie for the printer's mistakes, and so is presumably complete. The printing throughout is poor, and suggests that the compositor was not familiar with the English or Scots languages. Nevertheless, this is a remarkable survival and an important addition to the national collections.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2662(1-2)
Reference SourcesSTC 5161.5; 19072.3; ESTC S91420; S94574. Allison & Rogers, English Counter-Reformation, II 916 and 584
Acquired on20/04/07
Author(Colbert), Hamilton, Alexander, 10th Duke of Hamilton
TitleCatalogue des objects d'art & de curiosite au Palais d'Hamilton
Date of Publication1838
LanguageFrench
NotesA catalogue that never was. This is a quite remarkable curiosity that started life in France towards the end of the 17th Century, was bought in the early 18th Century by the 10th Duke of Hamilton and has now been purchased by the National Library of Scotland. Jean Baptiste Colbert (1619-1683) was Louis XIV's principal minister, an acknowledged financial wizard and an ardent book collector. At some date late in his career, he had made up for himself a volume of some 300 folio sheets of blank paper, watermarked with his own arms and bound in a striking red morocco armorial binding, showing a version of the Colbert arms. It is not clear what Colbert intended to do with this handsome volume but it is likely that he saw it as a manuscript catalogue of his extensive book collection. If that was the intention, then it never happened, for when Alexander Hamilton, 10th Duke of Hamilton and 7th Duke of Brandon purchased it sometime in the early decades of the 19th Century it was blank throughout. The 10th Duke was a committed Francophile and renewed a dormant family claim to the Dukedom of Chatelherault in the French peerage. His intention for the volume seems clear since there is a manuscript title leaf in pen and ink 'Catalogue des objects d'art & de curiosite au Palais d'Hamilton 1838' and there are manuscript headings for various rooms of the Palace such as 'Salle Appartenante a La Bibliotheque' and 'Bibliotheque' and 'Chambre de Toilette de Madame La Duchesse'. However these headings end half way through the volume as the Duke, like Colbert before him, grew bored or forgot this fine volume. The binding is late 17th Century full red morocco, gilt-panelled, with the arms of Jean Baptist Colbert in the centre panels of the upper and lower boards, surrounded by the collar s of the order of Saint-Michel and of the Saint-Esprit, and with coroneted monograms incorporating the letters JBC both at each of the central panels and in each of the seven compartments of the spine. From the library of the Dukes of Hamilton with the Hamilton's 19th Century armorial bookplate on the front pastedown.
ShelfmarkBdg.l.42
Acquired on22/12/00
Author[Anderson, Alan]
Title[Collection of c. 230 items printed by Alan Anderson at the Tragara Press]
Imprint[Edinburgh & Loanhead; Tragara Press]
Date of Publication1962-2009
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a collection of c. 230 letterpress items printed by Alan Anderson's Tragara Press between 1962 and 2009. The Tragara Press was founded in Edinburgh the early 1950s by Alan Anderson (1922 - ), the press taking its name from the famous Punta Tragara hotel on the Italian island of Capri, a favourite holiday destination for him. It is Scotland's longest-running, and, in terms of output, most prolific private press. Alan Anderson studied printing at Edinburgh College of Art in the early 1950s, and the first book with a Tragara Press imprint appeared in 1954. However, he worked mainly as a bookseller until the 1970s before devoting himself full-time to printing and publishing. In 1986 Anderson moved to Loanhead in Midlothian and is now based in Beauly, Inverness-shire. According to the most recent bibliography of the Tragara Press by Steven Halliwell, published in 2004, between 1954 and 1991 he printed and published himself c. 150 items. These items were usually small octavo pamphlets with the print runs of 100-200 numbered copies, printed from 1969 onwards on an 'Arab' treadle platen press, although some of them have smaller print runs. Anderson's aim has been to produce good quality, appropriate printing of selected texts (he has particular interest in Norman Douglas, Oscar Wilde, John Gray, Baron Corvo and other writers of the 1890s/early 20th-century) at affordable prices. His printing is characterised by its emphasis on typography rather than illustration and by its elegant, austere design; his books are now collectors' items among bibliophiles. He has also produced a substantial body of work from the 1950s onwards, usually contemporary poetry, which has been privately commissioned by other presses and by friends. From 1991 onwards his printing has been exclusively for other publishers, with the exception of his 2004 anthology of poems "Blue Remembered Hills". The Library has collected Tragara Press items for several years and held an exhibition of the Press's work in 2005. This collection supplements NLS's existing holdings of Tragara Press material by adding examples of work printed for other presses, such as Alan Clodd's Enitharmon Press and David Tibet's Durtro Press; it also includes examples of very rare printed ephemera, proof copies and variant printings on different papers, enabling one to trace the different stages in the printing of the individual publications.
ShelfmarkTrag.C
Reference SourcesS. Halliwell, "Fifty years of hand-printing: a bibliography of the Tragara Press", High Wycombe, 2005.
Acquired on12/11/10
Author[Andrew Bennett]
TitleThe book of St Andrews Links
ImprintSt Andrews: J.& G. Innes
Date of Publication1898
LanguageEnglish
NotesA rare early book on golf, printed in St Andrews, which the author describes as the 'mecca of golf'. The author, not named in the publication, was Andrew Bennett, (1871-1958), who would later serve as Secretary of St Andrews University and who, in addition to his interest in golf, was a keen amateur poet and artist. The book contains the rules and regulations of the game, information on the Old and New courses in St Andrews (including a colour map showing their location) and a selection of golfing rhymes. Only 1,000 copies of this edition were printed.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2724
Reference SourcesDonovan & Murdoch, "The game of golf and the printed word, 1566-1985 : a bibliography of golf literature in the English language " (Endicott, NY, 1988)no. 690 JSF Murdoch "The Murdoch golf library" (Droitwich, 1991)no. 57
Acquired on05/09/08
Author[Anon.]
TitleA geographical history of Nova Scotia
ImprintLondon: Paul Vaillant
Date of Publication1749
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is one of the earliest printed accounts of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, which describes the rival claims of the French and British to the region. Writing for prospective settlers, the anonymous author in the preface says he has drawn on his own observations and those of the French Jesuit priest turned historian Pierre Charlevoix when writing his book. He stresses the importance of Nova Scotia to British trade and the security of the other British North American settlements in view of increasing tensions with French settlers (which eventually led to war). The book also includes descriptions of the Indians living in the area and their relations with the European settlers.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2704
Reference SourcesBookseller's catalogue
Acquired on11/04/08
Author[Anon.]
TitleScotch gallantry display'd: or the life and adventures of the unparralel'd [sic] Col. Fr-nc-s Ch-rt-s, impartially related. With some remarks on other writers on this subject.
Imprint London: printed for, and sold by the booksellers in town and country,
Date of Publication1730
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the rare first edition of a pamphlet which gives an account of the life of the infamous Francis Charteris (c.1665­-1732), gambler and rake, who was born in Edinburgh, and whose family were major landowners in Scotland. The work was published at the height of his notoriety; in December 1729 Charteris was charged with the attempted rape of Ann Bond, one of his maidservants, who had been in his employment for only a few days. After hearing testimony from the girl herself, as well as from fellow servants, Charteris was found guilty and in February 1730 was sentenced to death by hanging. It was unusual at the time for a gentleman to be punished for what many contemporaries considered an act of gallantry, and his conviction may have been secured by influential parties hostile to Charteris. The rape, however, was just one such in a long career of gambling, extortion, and serial seduction, usually of tall young lower class girls (Charteris was 6 feet tall), recently arrived in London, ensnared by one of his employees and brought to his houses in the West End. If unable to secure their favours by fair means, he would resort to force. Charteris, however, escaped the gallows. On the advice of judges, privy council, and his advocate, Duncan Forbes (another legatee of Charteris's will), George II granted him a full pardon on 10 April. The trial and its aftermath had incurred expenses amounting to £15,000, but Charteris's personal fortune was estimated at £200,000 so this was a sum he could well afford. He may have bought his freedom, but for the rest of his life Charteris was vilified, and was once physically attacked in his coach. He left London for good in 1730, retiring to his property in Lancashire before returning to Scotland in February 1732. He died the following month at his Stony Hill estate near Musselburgh, after using "Opiates in great Quantities" (The Country Journal, 4 March 1732. At his burial in the family vault at the Greyfriars churchyard, Edinburgh, the populace gave a "loud Huzza" (Fog's Weekly Journal, 11 March 1732). Only one copy (in the British Library) is recorded in ESTC.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2755
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on07/05/09
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