Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 753 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

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Important Acquisitions 211 to 225 of 753:

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AuthorRussell, Robert Frankland
TitleDeer stalking in the Highlands.
Imprint[London]: J. Dickinson
Date of Publication1839
LanguageEnglish
NotesRobert Frankland (1784-1849) was a talented amateur artist who later assumed by royal licence the surname of Russell, after Frankland, on inheriting Chequers Court in Buckinghamshire from his kinsman Sir Robert Greenhill-Russell. This volume was presumably privately printed, and was sold for "the benefit of the York and Aylesbury Infirmary". It consists of a letterpress title page and 10 lithographed plates depicting scenes of deer stalking, from pursuit to successfull kill, after drawings/sketches by Frankland Russell. This particular copy is a presentation copy from him to the Viscountess Strathallan (Lady Amelia Sophia Drummond, wife of the 6th Viscount of Strathallan), perhaps as a token of gratitude for former visits to the Strathallan estate in Stobhall, Perthshire. The book stayed in the Drummond family and was sold in 2012 as part of the library of the late 17th Earl of Perth. Only other copy is recorded, in the British Library, which has a MS title page dated '1836'.
ShelfmarkRB.l.280
Acquired on28/09/12
AuthorFordyce, David
TitleDes Herrn Fordyce, beruehmten Professors zu Aberdeen in Engelland, Anfangsgruende der moralischen Weltweisheit; mit Herrn de Joncourt Abhandlung von der Oberherrschaft Gottes, und der sittlichen Verbindlichkeit, vermehrt.
ImprintZuerich: bey Orell und Comp.
Date of Publication1757
LanguageGerman
NotesDavid Fordyce (1711-1751) studied philosophy and mathematics at Marischal College ion Aberdeen, graduating with an MA at the age of 17. He then studied divinity, but despite obtaining a licence as a preacher, he never received a call. Instead, he was appointed professor of philosophy at Marischal College in 1742. Fordyce died in a storm off the coast of Holland at the age of 40. Fordyce wrote an article called 'Moral philosophy' for the magazin "The Modern Preceptor". This was published separately in 1754 as "Elements of Moral Philosophy". This posthumous publication was the most successful work on moral philosophy hitherto written. By 1769 it had gone through four editions. This is a copy of the German edition published in 1757.
ShelfmarkABS.2.204.024
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on20/05/04
AuthorMonboddo, James Burnett, Lord
TitleDes Lord Monboddo Werk von dem Ursprunge und Fortgange der Sprache
Imprint2 vols. Riga
Date of Publication1784-1785
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is the first German edition, an abridged translation of volumes 1-3,of Monboddo's seminal work Of the origin and progress of language, which was published in six volumes between 1773 and 1792. It is in fact the only translation of any of his works, published until the 1970s. The translation by E.A. Schmid, was prefaced with a translation by Johann Gottfried von Herder, the leading German philsopher. Herder praised the broad philosophical perspective from which Monboddo approached the topic of the origin of language. Although he believed that Monboddo did not have sufficient anatomical information to maintain the humanity of the orang-outang (one of the controversial claims made in vol.I), Herder did not think that this critique impacted on the thrust of the Scot's theory. Monboddo's claims that the men in the Nicobar Islands had tails and that the orang-outang was a class of the human species, lacking only speech, were ridiculed by his contemporaries including David Hume and Lord Kames. His linguistic descriptions were largely ignored. Herder was one critic who took a broader view, believing that Monboddo's comparison of a variety of languages of different cultures opened a new field of inquiry. According to Cloyd 'it is probable that Monboddo had influence in Germany, on Jacob Grimm and the other great nineteenth-century students of language ... German studies came closer to following directions suggested by Monboddo than British studies did; but there is nothing to indicate that he had any real influence in either place ... '. Monboddo (1714-1799), one of the key figures of the Scottish Englightenment, was born on the family estate of Monboddo in Kincardineshire, studied law at Edinburgh and Groningen, and was called to the bar in 1737. He rose through the legal hierarchy and became a Lord of Session in 1767. A member of the Select Society, he was a close friend of James Boswell. His other major work was Antient metaphysics, published in six volumes between 1779 and 1799.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2108
Reference SourcesCloyd, E.L. James Burnett Lord Monboddo. (Oxford, 1972) NC.273.h.20 Jooken, Lieve. The linguistic conceptions of Lord Monboddo (1714-1799) (Leuven, 1996) HP2.97.2761
Acquired on22/06/01
AuthorRamsay, Andrew Michael
TitleDes Ritters Ramsay reisender Cyrus
ImprintHamburg: heirs of Thomas von Wiering
Date of Publication1728
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is the first German edition of this important novel by a Scottish-born writer. Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686-1743) was a philosopher and mystic who converted to Catholicism but continued to argue for the underlying unity of all religions. Spending much of his adult life in Paris, he served the exiled Jacobite court and befriended David Hume; he also gave hospitality to the Glasgow printers Andrew and Robert Foulis. In 1727 he published 'Les voyages de Cyrus', and an English translation entitled 'The travels of Cyrus'appeared the same year. Based on the life of the first Persian emperor known as Cyrus the Great, this work anticipates the development of the novel during the later 18th century. The hero travels around the Mediterranean, learning about religion and morality in preparation for becoming ruler over many nations.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2608
Reference SourcesG. D. Henderson, 'Chevalier Ramsay', 1952
Acquired on17/08/05
TitleDescriptive sketch of the print of the death of Gen. Sir Ralph Abercrombie.
ImprintLondon: John P. Thompson
Date of Publication1804
LanguageEnglish and French
NotesThis broadside is a guide to a print depicting the death of General Sir Ralph Abercromby in Egypt in 1801. The death of Abercromby at the Battle of Alexandria was recorded by a number of painters including James Northcote, Philip de Loutherburg and Samuel James Arnold. It is likely that the print was based on the work of one of these painters. Abercromby was born in Menstrie, Clackmannanshire, in 1734. He was educated in Alloa and Rugby before studying law at the universities of Edinburgh and Leipzig. His military career began in 1758 during the Seven Years War. For a number of years in the 1770s he sat in Parliament as an MP for Clackmannanshire. The French Revolutionary Wars revived Abercromby's military career - he fought in Flanders and the West Indies, then served briefly in Ireland before the rebellion of 1798. In 1800 Abercromby was appointed as commander of the British forces in the Mediterranean. In the process of routing the French at Abu Qir Bay, near Alexandria in March 1801, he was fatally wounded. He was later buried on Malta. Abercromby was a popular figure in the British army and his death elevated him to hero-status among the general public. Curiously, although the imprint gives the date as 1804, the paper has a watermark dated 1809! The publisher was John Peter Thompson, who worked as an engraver, printer and printerseller in Great Newport Street, London from 1792 to 1813.
ShelfmarkRB.l.232
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on31/07/06
AuthorManderston, William
TitleDialectica Guillelmi Ma[n]deston. Tripartitum epithoma
Imprint[Lyon: Jacques Giunta]
Date of Publication[c. 1520]
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is an extremely rare Lyons printing of the "Tripartitum", a work on logic by the Scottish philosopher and logician William Manderston, with only one other copy being recorded, in the bibliotheque municipale of Lyons. Described as "one of the leading Scottish intellectuals of his age" (ODNB) Manderston (c.1485-1552) followed the standard career path of Scottish 15th- and 16th-century scholars. After graduating from Glasgow University in 1506, he moved to France and continued his education at the University of Paris, where he studied alongside other Scots including John Mair, George Lokert, and David Cranston. The "Tripartitum", Manderston's first published work, was first printed in Paris in 1517. It is, as the title implies, a three-part work in Latin on the principles of logic, dedicated to Andrew Forman, archbishop of St Andrews. A year later Manderston's "Bipartitum", a two-part work on moral philosophy, was published. Manderston remained in France until 1528, eventually becoming rector of the University of Paris and acting as a tutor and mentor to prominent Scots such as George Buchanan and the theologian Patrick Hamilton. On his return to Scotland he moved to St. Andrews, becoming rector of the University. This book also has an interesting provenance; an inscription on the title page of the book, 'Collegio de Montilla', shows that the book was formerly in the collection of the Jesuit college of Montilla, near Cordoba in southern Spain. It also has extensive marginal annotations in a 16th-century hand, by a former owner or student of the college.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2738
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on19/01/09
AuthorHume, David.
TitleDialogues sur la religion naturelle.Ouvrage posthume.
ImprintEdimbourg [i.e. Amsterdam] : [s.n.]
Date of Publication1780
LanguageFrench
ShelfmarkRB.s.2759
Reference SourcesThis is the second issue of the rare first French translation (by Paul Henri Thiry, baron d' Holbach) of Hume's "Dialogues concerning Natural Religion", his most important posthumous publication. Hume had been engaged on the work for many years, the first mention of the dialogues being in 1751; pressure from friends prevented their publication during his lifetime. In his will he left Adam Smith the job of overseeing their publication, but in a codicil he altered this to his publisher, Strahan. The task was probably finally executed by his nephew David. Despite the imprint this first French edition is probably printed and published in Holland, an assumption which is corroborated by the number of copies found in Dutch libraries. The first issue of the French translation appeared in 1779, the same year as the first English edition. In the Avertissement to the translation, Holbach notes that the Inquisition, "plus habile à brûler qu' à raisonner", viewed Hume's work as a "persifflage impie", but wonders if among the bookburners of Lisbon and Rome, there were not a few who would surreptitiously slip a copy of the "Dialogues" into their pocket, "pour le lire à la place de leur bréviaire".
Acquired on04/08/09
AuthorKorb, Johann Georg.
TitleDiarium itineris in Moscoviam.
ImprintVienna: Leopold Voigt
Date of Publication[1700]
LanguageLatin
NotesAn account of the Austrian diplomatic mission to Russia in 1698 to discuss an alliance against the Turkish Empire does not sound particularly thrilling, but this unexpectedly shocking book seems to have caused something of a diplomatic incident. While describing the progress of the embassy, Korb, the secretary to the embassy, described at length the turmoil of Russian internal politics. In the summer of 1698, the Tsar, Peter the Great, was on his famous incognito tour of western Europe, when the streltsy, the musketeer troops based in Moscow, rose up in rebellion. Curiously, the rebels were defeated by a Scottish general, Patrick Gordon. Gordon, born in 1635 at Auchleuchries in Aberdeenshire, had served in Russia since the 1660s, and rose to great eminence under Peter. As a Catholic, he was greatly distrusted by some in the Russian establishment (just as he would have been in Britain), but the Tsar's liking for Gordon extended so far that he was actually permitted to erect a stone-built Roman Catholic church in Moscow, in which Gordon was eventually buried. Gordon is mentioned repeatedly in this text, and some of the plates depict Gordon's fortifications at the town of Azov. Peter hastily returned to Russia at the news of the rebellion, and proceeded to carry out a ferocious retaliatory campaign involving torture, mass executions and the punishment of the rebels' wives and children. Korb records all this in gruesome detail, and the large plates with which this volume is illustrated depict Moscow festooned with gallows, people being burned and buried alive, and rows of prisoners waiting to be beheaded. All in all, this was not a book conducive to better Austro-Russian relations, and it seems that the Austrian government had it suppressed. This is consequently a scarce book, and this is an excellent copy, from the library and bearing the bookplate of Archibald, 5th earl of Rosebery, one of the greatest early benefactors of the National Library of Scotland.
ShelfmarkRB.m.468
Reference SourcesGordon, Patrick. Passages from the Diary. Aberdeen, 1859. MacDonnell transl.. Diary of an Austrian secretary of legation at the court of Czar Peter the Great. London, 1863.
Acquired on13/05/02
AuthorCommissioners and trustees for fisheries, manufactures and improvements in Scotland
TitleDirections for raising flax
ImprintEdinburgh
Date of Publication1763
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis rare pamphlet provides practical instructions for farmers who wished to grow flax. This crop had been grown to produce linen in Scotland as early as 1000 B.C. and in the eighteenth century, the linen industry was one of the most important in the country. The Act of Union of 1707 did not immediately have the desired effect of giving linen manufacturers access to new markets. The Board of Trustees for Fisheries and Manufactures, established in 1727, tried to encourage the growth of more flax as the industry was largely dependent on imports from Holland and the Baltic. This pamphlet includes information on choosing 'lintseed' (linseed), weeding, harvesting, stacking 'winning' (winnowing), watering and grassing (drying) flax. Further revised and extended editions were published in 1772 and 1781. By 1782 it seemed that such instructions were having an effect, as Scotland became almost self-sufficient in flax. It was mainly grown in the counties of Forfar, Renfrew, Lanark, Perth and Fife, where some farms grew as many as 50 acres of flax per year. By the 1830s, flax was in decline. Hand-loom weavers in the countryside found that the power loom was reducing their profits to almost nothing. Consequently the farmers ceased to grow flax and changed over to turnips and potatoes. The only other copy of this pamphlet is held at the British Library.
ShelfmarkABS.1.205.015
Reference SourcesT. Bedford Franklin, A history of Scottish farming. London, 1952M.L. Parry and T.R. Slater. (eds)The making of the Scottish countryside. Montreal, 1980.Alastair J. Durie (ed.). The British Linen Company. Edinburgh, 1996.
Acquired on10/06/05
AuthorWilliamson, Susan
TitleDirge or a voice in the night, originally addressed to a clergyman at Edinburgh 1845.
ImprintEdinburgh: Anderson and Bryce
Date of Publication1848
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis work is attributed to one Susan Williamson on the strength of a telling inscription on the verso of the dedication to Queen Victoria which reads: 'The writer of this book was Miss Susan Williamson who resided in Edinburgh with her brother Mr. David Williamson, in some of her ways she was odd, but not considered to be insane'. The 600 or so pages which follow can certainly be considered to be odd if not downright unintelligble to readers in the 21st century. An extract from the introduction sets the tone for what follows: 'And all vitellent spirits revolt or resault over whom was ratified reflection as a whispered word imputave before the perfectability of planatory imparature in the temporal attribute, whose nullity remained in premonitory complex' The book consists of short texts of a religious nature dealing with sin, creation, eternity and so on. The only other copy traced is at the British Library and no other works by Susan Williamson are known.
ShelfmarkABS.1.204.051
Acquired on03/03/04
AuthorHamilton, James.
TitleDisputatio Juridica.
ImprintEdinburgh
Date of Publication1728
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is a fine thesis binding in black morocco, with gold tooling on boards, spine, board edges and turn-ins. Fine green and gilt Dutch endpapers, with the attractive label of Kerr & Richardson, book makers of Glasgow, on the front pastedown. Curiously, Kerr & Richardson do not appear in SBTI. The actual text is ESTC T188177, the only other known copy of which is in the Advocates' Library. The textblock in this new copy is untrimmed and in superior condition. The binding complements that of Bdg.s.13, which may well have come from the same workshop: the structure of the design is similar, but different tools are used. The new copy is particularly distinguished by the stars in the panels on the spine, and the 'chain' design of the diagonals. The floral roll which makes up the central rectangle and which is repeated on the turn-ins is mostly crisp and clear, although there are a couple of slips on the front board where it can be seen how the craftsman ran on slightly too far.
ShelfmarkBdg.s.882
Acquired on30/01/02
AuthorA.M. graduate in Physic [Tobias Smollett]
TitleDon Ricardo Honeywater vindicated.
ImprintLondon: E. Pen
Date of Publication[1748]
LanguageEnglish
NotesIn 1748 the eminent English physician Richard Mead was viciously attacked in print by the London-based Scot William Douglas in the pamphlet "The cornutor of seventy-five". This withering response to Douglas's pamphlet appeared in the same year and includes a comprehensive rebuttal of Douglas's aspersions and a damning biography of Douglas, referred to here as 'Doctor Salguod'. The authorship of this rare satirical pamphlet has been convincingly attributed to Tobias Smollett. As a fellow Scot in London, Smollett must have been acutely aware of the prejudices against Scots in the wake of the recent Jacobite uprising, and was anxious to prevent Douglas from stirring up more trouble by attacking the most respected medical man in England. This pamphlet is signed on the final page 'Gill Blas', the same moniker used by Smollett, who had done an English translation of Lesage's work "Gil Blas", in his pamphlet "Thomsonus Redivivus". Smollett's stout defence of Mead appears to have ended Douglas's literary career and no doubt enhanced Smollett's standing in the medical and literary community of London.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2638(2)
Reference SourcesESTC; DNB; R.A. Day, "The cornutor of seventy-five and Don Ricardo Honeywater vindicated", The Augustan Reprint Society publication no. 224-225, Los Angeles, 1987
Acquired on24/11/06
TitleDonation of 4 items of ephemera, relating to bicentenary celebrations for Robert Burns on 25 January 1959, organised by the Scottish District of the Communist Party
Notes1. Single Sheet Flyer, for the event in St Andrew's Hall, Glasgow 2. Ticket for the event 3. Souvenir Programme of the event signed by J. F. Campbell, Hugh MacDiarmid and Alex McCrindle Three rare items of ephemera relating to bicententary celebrations for Robert Burns on 25 January 1959, organised by the Scottish District of the Communist Party. The programme is especially interesting as it lists the various contributors to the evening, including Hugh MacDiarmid and John Ross Campbell, editor of the Daily Worker.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2079
Acquired on29/01/01
TitleDreadful fray, which took place at Culrain near Gladsfield in Ross-shire
ImprintEdinburgh?
Date of Publication1820
NotesA rare broadside consisting of letters printed in the 'Scotsman' and the 'Glasgow Courier', which gives a graphic, if one-sided, account of one of the flashpoints of the Clearances. In early 1820 Hugh Munro, the laird of Novar in Easter Ross, decided to clear his estates at Culrain, effectively evicting nearly 600 people, and place the land under sheep. No provision had been made for their resettlement. One of the letter writers describes Munro's actions as 'improvements' and the actions of the law-agents as 'warning' the people from their farms. A few weeks prior to the incident described in this document, the law-agent on arriving to serve the Writs of Removal, was driven from the area. Subsequently, Sheriff Donald Macleod backed up by a small force of constables and militiamen was attacked by a 1000-strong 'mob', of whom women, labelled 'amazons', were to the fore. Once again the authorities were forced to retreat, but not before one local woman was mortally wounded, something not mentioned in these accounts. However faced with the power of the civil and military authorities and the stern disapproval of the local minister, the Rev. Alexander Macbean, the tenants submitted shortly afterwards. But for the ultimately unsuccessful resistance of the people, it is unlikely that this incident would have reached the newspapers. There was considerable nervousness among the authorities, a fear that local unrest was symptomatic of wider radicalism given the recent occurences at Peterloo and Cato Street. The broadside was printed, probably in Edinburgh by William Cameron, known as 'Hawkie', a speech-crier and a well-known printer of street literature, who mainly worked in Glasgow.
ShelfmarkAPS.5.201.11
Acquired on06/03/01
AuthorMorris, William.
TitleDream of John Ball and a king's lesson.
ImprintHammersmith, Kelmscott Press
Date of Publication1892
LanguageEnglish
NotesA valuable addition to the Library's large collection of Kelmscott Press publications. The Kelmscott Press, modestly described by William Morris himself, as 'a little typographical adventure' is regarded as the most influential and famous of the private presses which emerged in the latter years of the nineteenth century. Between 1891 and 1898, 52 books were produced of which the Library holds 49. Morris sought to emulate the books produced in the early years of printing and 'to produce books which it would be a pleasure to look upon as pieces of printing and arrangement of type'. Morris oversaw every aspect of the production and design of the Kelmscott books 'the paper, the form of the type, the relative spacing of the letters, the words and the lines, and lastly the position of the printed matter on the page'. A king's lesson and A dream of John Ball were first published in the socialist journal Commonweal in 1886 and 1887. This utopian socialist work is one of the few writings of the press with clear political overtones. Most of the Kelmscott books, were works of literature, including many medieval texts. This is one of the 300 copies printed on paper; 11 were also printed on vellum. The frontispiece was engraved by W.H. Hooper based on a design by Sir Edward Burne-Jones, with the lettering and border being designed by Morris.
ShelfmarkFB.s.752
Acquired on02/11/00
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