Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 752 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

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Important Acquisitions 226 to 240 of 752:

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AuthorReid, Alan.
TitleDundee from the tram cars : an illustrated guide to the city and its surroundings.
ImprintDundee: John Durham & Co.
Date of Publication1908
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis well-illustrated guide book to Dundee and the surrounding area was published by the local Tramways Committee. There are descriptions of the notable places to see along all the routes. The preface notes that 'the horse and steam haulage of earlier days has given place to electric traction'. The statistics which follow are impressive - 20,000 miles covered weekly, 15 million passengers conveyed annually. The guide also includes a map of the tram routes with a list of the routes, fares, stations and distances. Electric trams were on the streets of Dundee for over 50 years from 1900 to 1956. Loosely inserted in the volume are a number of interesting ephemeral items: Dundee City Tramways security card from 1911 and an employees pass for Andrew Thomson dated March 1910. There is also a photograph of a driver and conductor standing in front of the Blackness tram.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2712
Acquired on30/06/08
Author[Anon]
TitleEarnest invitation to all profane persons to repent.
ImprintEdinburgh: Society for Promoting Religious Knowledge among the Poor.
Date of Publication1757
LanguageEnglish
NotesSwearing, drunkenness and working on Sundays are still issues in contemporary society, as they were over 250 years ago when this stern tract was printed warning of the dangers in indulging in these vices. The tract was printed for the Society for Promoting Religious Knowledge among the Poor (SPRKP), an organisation founded in London in 1750, which was the first of the evangelical tract societies that were established in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was founded by Protestant dissenters, but included many Anglicans among its members; its object was to promote religion by distributing bibles and cheap tracts, usually written by dissenting ministers, to the poor. The Society co-existed with the establishment church-orientated Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge, and later with the Society for Distributing Religious Tracts among the Poor, founded by the Methodist leader John Wesley in 1782. In 1756 branches of the SPRK were founded in Edinburgh and Glasgow along the same lines as the London model. The anonymous "Earnest invitation" is one of at least three Society publications printed by Ebenezer Robertson in Edinburgh in the late 1750s. Very few of Society's publications survive and there is only one other copy of this book recorded in ESTC, in the British Library's collections. This particular tract covers three sins: swearing and profanity, with particular regard to the army and navy; 'the great sin of profaning the Lord's day by worldly business and pleasures'; and 'the great evil of the sin of drunkenness'. The author may, according to lists of books published by the SPRKP, be the evangelical minister Isaac Toms (1709-1801) from Hadleigh in Suffolk, who is known to have written five tracts for the Society. In the tract the author thunders, "It is not to be doubted but the glaring impiety and gross profaneness of our armies and fleets, and the bulk of the nation, had had a great hand in raising the storm of divine judgements on man and beast". Published at a time when Britain was fighting the Seven Years War on the Continent and the French in North America, this was alarming stuff intended to shock sinners into repentance. Whether the book had any effect on the profane of Edinburgh is open to question. The SPRKP's influence in Scotland appears to have been confined to the 18th century, but elsewhere it lasted into the early part of the 20th century, although it is now largely forgotten.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2794
Reference SourcesIsabel Rivers "The first evangelical tract society" The Historical Journal, vol. 50, no. 1 (2007), pp. 1-22.
Acquired on09/07/10
TitleEdinburgh and Port-Patrick time-bill.
Imprint[Scotland]
Date of Publicationc.1790
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a timetable for the Edinburgh to Portpatrick mail-coach, printed during the 1790s. It sets out the time and the distance for each stage of the journey, along with the name of the contractor responsible for each portion of the journey. The distance covered by the route, which took in places including Moffat, Dumfries, Newton Stewart, Glenluce and Stranraer, was 156 miles. The coach took 23 hours and 20 minutes to cover this distance, allowing for 30 minutes of 'office business' at Stranraer. This was considerably slower than the average royal mail coach, which moved at 11 mph in around 1800, and is indicative of the poor state of Scottish roads at the time.A weekly mail service from Portpatrick to Donaghadee in Co. Down (a distance of 21 miles) was established in 1662. In 1790 a daily mail service was introduced with the Post Office using its own vessels. Previously the mail had been carried by contract in privately owned ships. Portpatrick was also used as a port for sending troops and cattle to and from Ireland. The Portpatrick-Donaghdee route was superceded by the Stranraer-Larne crossing in the 1860s. A regular coach travel for passengers between England and Scotland was only introduced in the 1750s. The journey from London to Edinburgh/Glasgow took 10 or 12 days depending on the season. By the 1780s this had been reduced to 4 days. Within Scotland there were coaches operating between Edinburgh and Glasgow from 1749 and from Edinburgh to Perth and Stirling by 1767. The use of mail coaches, which also catered for passengers, only began in Scotland in 1786 with the London-Edinburgh mail coach which travelled via the Great North Road. Edinburgh-Portpatrick followed in 1790 and Edinburgh-Aberdeen in 1798. However the heyday of the mail coach was short-lived. It was superceded by the railway in most parts of Scotland by the mid-19th century.
ShelfmarkAPS.4.206.013
Reference SourcesCunningham, R.R. Portpatrick through the ages. (1974) Gordon, Anne. To move with the times: the story of transport and travel in Scotland (1988)
Acquired on13/09/06
TitleEdinburgh Calotype Club Album, Volume 1
Date of Publicationc. 1848
LanguageEnglish
NotesBy an extraordinary sequence of events, the Library, in partnership with Edinburgh City Council, purchased the 'lost' Edinburgh Calotype Album at auction on 12 December 2001. The sister album (volume 2) was acquired by Edinburgh Central Library in 1952. Having the output of the club, acknowledged as the first photographic society in the world, reunited in Edinburgh is a remarkable coup. The Edinburgh Calotype Club was formed in the early 1840s after a group of Edinburgh gentlemen, mostly advocates, doctors and academics, were introduced to the process by Sir David Brewster (1781-1868). The photographs in the album are a mixture of portraits, landscapes, buildings and sculptures, most of them showing locations in Scotland such as Edinburgh, Newhaven, St Andrews, Fairlie and Inverness. These invaluable images enable the researcher to discover a wealth of information about Scotland and its people in the mid-19th Century. As part of the project, both albums have been digitised and mounted on a specially designed website www.nls.uk/pencilsoflight to enable the widest possible access to this resource. The project received financial support from: The Heritage Lottery Fund The National Art Collections Fund The Gordon Fraser Charitable Trust Edinburgh City Council http://www.nls.uk/pencilsoflight/
ShelfmarkPhot.med.33
Acquired on06/09/02
Author[Gilchrist, Archibald]
TitleEdinburgh sold by Arch. Gilchrist & Co. at their warehouse behind the city-guard ....
Imprint[Edinburgh ; Archibald Gilchrist]
Date of Publication[1781]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a fascinating piece of late 18th-century printed ephemera. It is an engraved trade card for the Edinburgh haberdasher Archibald Gilchrist which provides a list of goods that he sold at his "warehouse behind the city-guard". Around the middle of the eighteenth century Gilchrist had moved from Lanarkshire to establish his business in Edinburgh. At that time he was one of only two haberdashers in the city, the other being John Neil. The business became Archibald Gilchrist & Co. when two of his nephews named Mackinlay became partners. On Gilchrist's death the company was dissolved and around 1788 his son, also Archibald (c.1766-1804), set up as a haberdasher on the South Bridge.
ShelfmarkAP.1.210.12
Acquired on29/05/10
TitleEdinburgh the twenty day of May
ImprintEdinburgh: by John Moncur
Date of Publication1726
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis broadside announces the annual Edinburgh archery competition, founded in 1709, for which the prize was a silver arrow. The contest was to take place at Leith Links, in July 1726. Only members of the Royal Company of Archers, a patriotic society with strong Jacobite leanings, were eligible to take part. The winner was to keep the silver arrow for a year, and have his badge fixed to it with the badges of previous winners. When he returned the arrow at the end of that year, he was to receive five pounds. It seems that John Earl of Wigtown was the winner in 1726. The woodcut headpiece shows the arms and motto of the City of Edinburgh, with the doe and maiden supporters (but not the coronet and anchor). Together with the large historiated initial, this adds to the attraction of a most interesting single-sheet item. Only one other copy of this broadside has been traced.
ShelfmarkRB.l.134
Reference SourcesESTC T32423 http://www.xs4all.nl/~marcelo/archery/library/books/book_of_archery/chapter07/chapter7_5.html Old Leith at leisure, James Scott Marshall (1976) HP1.77.865 Sports and pastimes of Cotland, Fittis (1975). H2.88.473
Acquired on20/05/03
AuthorR.C.H.
TitleEdinburgh weekly miscellany.
ImprintEdinburgh: J. Elder [J. Colston]
Date of Publication1831-1832
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the second recorded copy of the complete run (14 issues) of a short-lived Edinburgh newspaper, the other complete run being in the Mitchell Library, Glasgow. The editorial to the first issue reveals that this will be a literary newspaper/periodical with a difference: 'As it is a well known fact, that many possessed of genius, and strong mental power, have, from diffidence, want of opportunity, and a thousand other obvious reasons, confined their efforts to their own solitary perusal, or, at most, to the limited circle of their private friends. To give such an opportunity of placing their productions before the public eye, a column will always be reserved in the Weekly Miscellany'. Despite these fine sentiments, the paper also relied on snippets of works taken from established authors, such as John Galt, Francis Jeffrey and Washington Irving. The "Waterloo directory of Scottish newspapers and periodicals" also notes that the paper continually stresses the evils of intemperance. Issued on a weekly basis, the 8-page long "Weekly Miscellany" appears initially to have been a success. By the time of the fifth number in December 1831 the editor refers to the 'unprecedented demand' for the publication; moreover, the list of agents selling it in Edinburgh grows considerably over the first few issues, with agents appearing in other places in central Scotland by the time issue 7 is printed. By issue 13 the publication date has shifted from Wednesday to Saturday as a result of a delay in producing a masthead (an engraving of the goddess Minerva) for the Miscellany. However, the next issue proved to be the last one, with the editor revealing that some of the agents had been less than forthcoming in paying him for the copies they had sold, leaving him unable to continue to producing the paper. At the end of this final issue is a note by the editor, asking for any unwanted copies of issues one and two, in order to make up complete sets, which were bound up with a general title page and index. This particular copy is a complete set, with a general title page which reveals that the Miscellany was 'conducted by R.C.H.'. The identity of R.C.H., who was presumably the editor and founder of the paper, is not known. The NLS copy has an inscription on the general title page: Janet Howison Craufurd Craufurdland 1833. Craufurdland castle in Ayrshire is the family seat of Howison (Houison) Craufurd family, (Winifred) Janet was a daughter of the then laird William Howison Craufurd. There is a further note in pencil on the title page stating that someone recovered this book from becoming snuff paper.
ShelfmarkAB.10.212.44
Reference SourcesWaterloo directory of Scottish newspapers and periodicals, 1800-1900 (ed. J.S. North), Waterloo, Ont., 1989, no. 2296
Acquired on23/12/11
AuthorRichard of St Victor
TitleEgregii patris et clari theologi Ricardi ... de superdivina trinitate theologicu[m] opus.
ImprintParis: Estienne
Date of Publication1510
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is an early Estienne imprint and the first edition of a treatise on the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, which defines God as three divine persons or hypostases: the Father, the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit. It is not included in Richard's "Opera omnia" published four years earlier. The work was edited by Jacques Lefèvre d'Etaples (Jacobus Faber Stapulensis, ca. 1460-1536) who also wrote the commentary. The Augustinian theologian Richard of St Victor (d. 1173?) became prior of the abbey of St Victor at Paris and is supposed to have composed this doctrine after his appointment at St Victor in 1162. Richard was thought from the 16th century onwards to have been a Scot, but there is no concrete evidence to prove this assumption. However, the printing of book is probably an example of how Hector Boece and other 16th-century Scottish scholars sought to promote all things Scottish on the Continent through the agency of the leading Parisian printers of the day. In the same year Estienne printed John Mair/Major's "In Primum Sententiarum" and its sequel "In Secundum Sententiarum" for Josse Bade d'Asch. Estienne would almost certainly have thought he was printing a Scottish author. The text is notable for its six woodcut diagrams variously illustrating the composition of the Trinity.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2872
Reference SourcesBooksellers' notes; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on26/07/13
TitleEl Grafico, 16 Junio 1923
ImprintBuenos Aires
Date of Publication1923
LanguageSpanish
NotesThis Argentinian weekly sporting magazine contains a double page spread on Third Lanark's first game of their South American tour in the summer of 1923. Thirds were in fact the first Scottish side, strengthened by some guest players, to visit South America. They lost this encounter against an 'Argentine Select' 1-0 in front of 20,000 screaming fans in the Palermo Stadium in Buenos Aires. What the brief report does not mention was that at one point after Thirds had been awarded a corner, missiles - including knives and live ammunition - were thrown onto the pitch. The Scots walked off in protest but were later persuaded to return and finish the game. In all Third Lanark (who are not named in the magazine) played eight matches in Argentina and Uruguay, winning four of them. Third Lanark Athletic Club were formed in 1872 by members of Third Lanark Rifle Volunteers and was one of Scotland's foremost football clubs until they went into liquidation in 1967.
ShelfmarkAP.5.206.02
Reference SourcesBell, Bert. Still seeing red: a history of Third Lanark A.C. Glasgow, 1996.
Acquired on20/05/05
TitleEleanora, or a Tragical but true case of incest in Great Britain.
ImprintLondon: M. Cooper, 1751.
Date of Publication1751
LanguageEnglish
NotesA very rare (only 4 known copies of this edition, another being printed in Dublin in the same year) and very bizarre novella reportedly transcribed from a manuscript compiled by the anonymous author/editor's grandfather in 1685. The main action in the book takes place in Scotland, where the main pseudonymous protagonists, the widow Eleanora and her son Orestes, through an extraordinary and unbelievable chain of events 'enjoy' a night of passion - Orestes believing in the darkness that the woman he is bedding to be another, Arene. The Oedipal encounter results in the birth of a daughter, Cornelia, who when she reaches adulthood meets Orestes and marries him, much to the horror of Eleanora. A few years later Orestes encounters Arene, who tells him that she was not the one he slept with all those years ago. The truth is revealed, and Eleanora dies of shock as does Cornelia, a devastated Orestes commits suicide. The "Monthly Review" for September 1751 notes very sternly that this work is clearly a piece of fiction and that "the publication of cases of this sort ought never to be encouraged, even if proved to be fact; as the knowledge of such unnatural, and (happily) uncommon crimes, cannot possibly be attended with any good consequences: as examples, they will probably never deter others, but may inspire people with thoughts of such practices as otherwise might never have entered their imaginations."! There is little attempt to disguise the fictive nature of the torrid prose of "Eleanora", only a few specific events are mentioned: Orestes' father Eugenio dies at the siege of "Fort St. Martins in the Isle of Ree" (Lough Ree in Ireland?); Orestes, after studying at Glasgow University, serves on the Parliamentarian side at the battle of Naseby in 1645; he goes on to enjoy a career in the army which is ended by the Restoration of Charles II; about 7 years after the Restoration he helps a friend to get elected as MP for Pontefract [elections in Pontefract were held in 1661 then 1679). On the front pastedown of this copy is (a) an old bookseller's slip which notes that this story was used by Horace Walpole for his play "The Mysterious Mother" (1768) (this is unconfirmed) (b) a book label of Diana Maria Dowdeswell (possibly a daughter of the politician William Dowdeswell, a friend of Horace Walpole).
ShelfmarkRB.s.2324
Reference SourcesJ. Raven "British Fiction 1750-1770" 69
Acquired on29/04/04
AuthorScott, Robert Eden (1770-1811)
TitleElements of Rhetoric
ImprintAberdeen: b. J. Chalmers
Date of Publication1802
LanguageEnglish
NotesRobert Eden Scott was an important figure in the Aberdeen Enlightenment. Born in 1769 or 1770, he studied at Aberdeen and Edinburgh (where he was taught by Dugald Stewart, among other notables), eventually returning to his native Aberdeen to teach at King's College. Scott taught a wide range of topics, including mathematics and geology, moral philosophy and rhetoric - he even became involved in the Ossian controversy. Scott was well informed and interested in new scientific developments, but his traditional Christian beliefs led him to take a stand against many new theories. He associated the theory that the earth was older than the traditional interpretation of Genesis would permit with the violence of the French revolution. Scott became the first Professor of Moral Philosophy at King's, and this work seems to have arisen from private classes he held while in that position. Scott analyses the workings of language, style, taste, and the different effects of different kinds of writing. The book is extremely rare, with two copies at Aberdeen University Library only. As Scott's first published work, it is an important addition to our holdings of Scottish philosophy and literary theory.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2294
Reference SourcesJessop, Bibliography of David Hume, 1938, p. 169. Wood, Paul B., The Aberdeen Enlightenment, 1993 DNB
Acquired on02/07/03
AuthorStrathy, Alexander.
TitleElements of the art of dancing.
ImprintEdinburgh
Date of Publication1822
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the only known copy of this book in Britain - the only other recorded copy is at the Library of Congress. It is one of the earliest and most important manuals devoted to the performance of 'la danse de la ville', better known as the quadrille, which came to Britain from the salons of Paris around 1815. In the preface Strathy, a dancing master about whom little is known, opined that 'dancing may be to the body what reading is to the mind'. The book is divided into two parts. Part one contains an extensive account of exercises for the improvement of one's deportment. Part two provides precise descriptions for more than twenty steps for the quadrille, including a number of new steps added by the author. The book concludes with directions, given in French and English for eleven quadrille figures.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2059
Acquired on27/11/00
AuthorScott, Walter
TitleElena Duglas ili Deva Ozera Lok-Katrinskago [Lady of the lake]
ImprintMoscow: V Universitetskoi Tipografii
Date of Publication1828
LanguageRussian
NotesThis is an early Russian translation of Sir Walter Scott's narrative poem 'The Lady of the lake', first published in English in 1810. The poem was an immediate and huge success, selling 25,000 copies in 8 months, and helped spread Scott's fame beyond English-speaking lands. He became probably the most popular foreign author in Russia in the 19th century, the first Russian translation of his works, some extracts from 'Ivanhoe', appeared as early as 1820. His influence can be seen not only in the development of the Russian historical novel, but also in the vogue for wearing tartan and dressing up as characters from his novels. This translation (the name of the translator is unknown) is in turn taken from a French translation, possibly the 1813 translation by Elisabeth de Bon.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2878
Acquired on04/10/13
AuthorBuerger, Gottfried August.
TitleEllenore, a ballad originally written in German by G.A. Buerger.
ImprintPrinted in Norwich by John March.
Date of Publication1796
NotesThis an unrecorded folio, large-paper, printing of a translation of a German poem that would help launch one of the great Scottish literary careers. The short poem "Lenore", written by Gottfried August Bürger, was originally published in German in 1774. It is a Gothic ballad dealing with the return of a young man, William, presumed killed in battle, to his grief-stricken fiancee, Lenore, in the middle of night. William asks Lenore to accompany him to their bridal bed. After riding at breakneck speed through the night, they reach a cemetery where the bridal bed is revealed to be William's grave and he himself has mutated into the figure of Death, the grim reaper. Lenore meets her end surrounded by the ghosts of the dead who tell her not to quarrel with her fate and to hope for forgiveness. "Lenore" was an instant hit and was hugely influential on the European Romantic movement in literature. The first English translation to appear in print was this one by William Taylor of Norwich. Taylor (1765-1836) was an important propagandist of German literature in the romantic period. He began his literary career in 1789 with an accomplished translation of Goethe's "Iphigenie auf Tauris" (published in 1793), then in 1790 he translated Lessing's "Nathan der Weise". His translation of Bürger's "Lenore" was first published in 1796 in The Monthly Magazine, then was printed separately by John March of Norwich. Taylor's free translation was actually done in 1790 and had been circulating widely in manuscript in literary circles since then. It was commonly regarded as the best translation at that time, and is important as having inspired Walter Scott to do his own translation, the starting point of Scott's whole poetical career (a copy of this Norwich 1796 printing can be found in Scott's library at Abbotsford). In 1795 Scott had heard about the enthusiastic reception given to a reading of Taylor's version done by Anna Laetitia Aikin at a party given by Dugald Stewart, and he subsequently attempted to acquire a manuscript of Bürger's original. When he finally acquired a German text the following year he immediately set about the task of translating it; 'He began the task ... after supper, and did not retire to bed until he had finished it, having by that time worked himself into a state of excitement which set sleep at defiance' (Lockhart, Memoirs of the life of Sir Walter Scott, 1.235). Scott was sufficiently pleased with the reaction of his friends that he proceeded to translate another Bürger poem, "Der wilde Jäger", and the two were published together anonymously as "The Chase and William and Helen: Two Ballads from the German of Gottfried Augustus Bürger" in November 1796, priced 3s. 6d. The "German-mad" Scott's literary career had begun.
ShelfmarkAB.10.212.45
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on18/05/12
AuthorJohann N.C. Buchenroeder
TitleElliots Leben: nebst practischen Bemerkungen aus dessen Leben gezogen zur Bildung junger Krieger und anderer Personen vom Stande.
ImprintHamburg: Moellerische Buchhandlung
Date of Publication1783
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is a second edition of a German biography by Johann Nicolaus Carl Buchenroeder of the celebrated Scottish army officer, George Augustus Eliott, later to become first Baron Heathfield of Gibraltar (1717-1790). Eliott was born in Stobs, Roxburghshire, the seventh son of the baronet, Sir Gilbert Eliott. He studied on the continent before beginning a long and illustrious military career, seeing active service as a volunteer in the Prussian army. Eliott also served in the British army on the Continent during the War of the Austrian Succession and Seven Years War, but is now best remembered for his leadership of the British garrison of Gibraltar. He arrived as governor in 1779 and supervised the improvement of fortifications before the impending attack by French and Spanish forces. The garrison had in 1775 also been reinforced by three battalions from Hanover in Germany (King George III being king of Hanover as well). For two and a half years the 6,000 British and German troops were subject to heavy bombardment and a blockade by the French and Spanish floating batteries. The garrison managed to hold firm, despite existing on starvation rations, until the lifting of the siege in 1783. This German biography appeared in the wake of Eliott's triumph and is illustrated with six plates, four of which are folding plates which show plans/battle scenes of Gibraltar, the other two being portraits of George III and Eliott himself. (In this copy the plates have all been hand-coloured). The foreword to this second enlarged edition states that the first edition of 1,500 copies had not been deemed sufficient to meet the demands of the wider German readership, hence the publication of the second edition of 2,000 copies, which includes a poem written on behalf of 'German patriots' in praise of the 'defender of Gibraltar'. The publication of a German biography is a testament to the role the Hanoverian soldiers played in the epic defence of this strategic outpost. It also plays on the close links between the German states and the British Hanoverian monarchy, united against the common foe, France, as well as Eliott's own connection with Germany throughout his career, which is presented as a model one for young German soldiers to follow. The link between Hanover and Gibraltar was maintained by the Hanoverian army; to honour the survivors of the siege, the three battalions that served there were authorised to wear a blue cloth cuff-title embroidered with the name of Gibraltar. Even after Hanover, and its army, was assimilated by Prussia in 1866, the soldiers of the Hanoverian fusilier regiment no. 73 wore the Gibraltar cuff-title right up to the end of the 1st World War. The Gibraltar regiment served on the Western Front throughout the war, ironically fighting against British forces most of the time, with its most famous member being the author Ernst Juenger, author of war memoir "Storm of steel".
ShelfmarkAB.1.212.43
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on23/12/11
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