Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 727 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

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Important Acquisitions 241 to 255 of 727:

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AuthorAnderson, James
TitleNeues Constitutionenbuch der alten ehrwuerdigen Bruederschaft der Freimaurer
ImprintFrankfurt: In der Andreaeischen Buchhandlung
Date of Publication1743
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is the second, enlarged edition of the German translation of James Anderson's "The Constitutions of the Free Masons; containing the History, Charges, Regulations, &c. of that Most Ancient and Right Worshipful Fraternity. For the Use of the Lodges", which was first published in 1723. Organised freemasonry became established in 1717 when four London lodges formed themselves into a Grand Lodge. In 1721 Anderson, himself a freemason, was asked to produce a rulebook, the Constitutions, which passed through several English editions and was translated into German. The Constitutions are based on a manuscript rulebook which existed in several handwritten copies, dealing with the masons' duties and regulations as well as the history of masonry from the creation. This edition has a beautiful folded frontispiece engraving representing the armorial sword. The sword plays an important part in Masonic ceremonial and the Grand Sword Bearer leads all processions of Grand Lodge carrying a similar sword.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2334
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on20/10/03
AuthorAnderson, James
TitleEnquiry into the nature of the Corn-Laws; With a View to the New Corn-Bill Proposed for Scotland
ImprintEdinburgh, Mrs Mundell
Date of Publication1777
LanguageEnglish
Notes8vo pp. 60 [1] author's apology, [1] blank with an inscription 'To Barond de Podmaniesky, From the Author' on the verso of the flyleaf facing the title. Yet another key text composed by a Scot that explained for the first time one of the main components of economic theory. According to Schumpeter, Anderson 'invented the 'Ricardian' theory of rent' and 'had to an unusual degree what so many economists lack, Vision'. Further praise came when in 1845, J. R. McCulloch wrote 'Though published nearly at the same time as the 'Wealth of Nations', Dr Smith, to whom they might have been of essential service, did not profit by them in revising any subsequent edition of his great work; and so completely were they forgotten, that when, in 1815, Mr Malthus and Sir Edward West published their tracts exhibiting the nature and progress of rent, they were universally believed to have, for the first time, discovered the laws by which it is governed [however] the true theory of rent had been quite as well and as satisfactorily explained by Dr Anderson in 1777 as it was by them in 1815.' Anderson was born in 1739 in Hermiston At age 15 he began working on a farm in Aberdeenshire where he invented the Scotch plough. In 1780 he took an LL.D degree at Aberdeen. In 1783 he had privately printed observations on fisheries in the West of Scotland; between 1790-1793 he edited the journal 'The Bee' which contained many informative papers on economic development. He lived in London from 1797 and died 1808.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2084
Acquired on06/10/00
AuthorAnderson, James
TitleObservations on the means of exciting a spirit of national industry; chiefly intended to promote the agriculture, commerce, manufactures, and fisheries, of Scotland.
ImprintDublin : S. Price, W. and H. Whitestone,
Date of Publication1779
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the first Irish printing of a work originally published in Edinburgh in 1777, which contains one of the earliest critiques of Adam Smith's recently-published "Wealth of nations". The author, James Anderson (1739-1808), was a landowner and farmer. As well as devoting himself to agricultural matters, Anderson also had a strong interest in the subject of political economy and published a large number of articles in newspapers, pamphlets and other people's publications, often using a pseudonym. In his lengthy preface to this work, he reveals that he had considered remaining anonymous but thought that it would be "a somewhat mean and disingenuous appearance to keep himself concealed". The work consists of a series of letters outlining his thoughts on the future of Scotland's economic output, with special reference to the economically depressed Highlands. Letter XIII in volume two of the "Observations" is largely devoted to arguments put forward in the "Wealth of nations". Anderson refers to Smith's "very ingenious treatise", before proceeding, very politely, to take serious issue with Smith's "entirely fallacious" thinking on aspects of Britain's Corn Laws. Smith had been critical of the existing legislation, which was designed to protect major English landholders by encouraging the export and limiting the import of corn when prices fell below a fixed point. Anderson the farmer and landowner preferred to defend the status quo. Anderson dedicated his work to the Duke of Buccleuch, a major landowner who took a keen interest in Scottish agriculture, but who also happened to be a former pupil and a patron of Adam Smith.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2783-2784
Acquired on30/04/10
AuthorAnderson, James.
TitleThe true interest of Great Britain considered.
Imprint[London?: J. Anderson]
Date of Publication1783
LanguageEnglish
NotesIn 1783 the agriculturist and political economist James Anderson (1739-1808), having already written a number of important pamphlets and articles on a wide range of subjects, turned his attention in this treatise to the regeneration of the economy in northern Scotland and the Hebrides. The printed "advertisement" at the beginning indicates that the work was written in 1782 and that plans to publish it in London the following year were initially shelved due to the British government being preoccupied with the drafting of the peace treaty to end the American War of Independence. Anderson therefore had printed a small number of copies for private circulation amongst his friends in the hope that they might provide him with some constructive comments. No place of printing is given; it is likely to have been either London, where Anderson made frequent visits and where the intended readership among the political classes for his work was based, or Edinburgh, where Anderson had moved to in 1783 after farming in Aberdeenshire for several years. In the work Anderson describes the limited possibilities for economic growth in the Highlands and urges the government to protect and subsidise the local fishing industry. He hoped that the creation of "large and populous marts" would lead to an increase in towns and villages on the Scottish coastline, which would in turn stimulate economic growth. Anderson's protectionist stance led to a temporary falling-out with his friend Jeremy Bentham, who had attempted to stop Anderson publishing the treatise. This particular copy has been bought for its copy specific features. It is printed on special thick paper and includes an extra printed dedication leaf to Henry Dundas, first Viscount Melville (1742-1811), then lord advocate and unofficial minister for Scotland, who was endeavouring to restore the fortunes of the Highlands after the damage done to the economy and social order after the Jacobite uprising of 1745/46. The leaf is not present in at least two of the two of the four recorded copies in ESTC(the British Library copy and copy held in a collection on deposit in NLS). Moreover, the work has probably been bound by one of the most celebrated Scottish bookbinders of the eighteenth century, James Scott of Edinburgh. It may have been specially commissioned by Anderson for presentation to Dundas and may have been one of Scott's last bindings, as the latest binding that has been assigned to him dates from 1784. The binding is not recorded in J.H. Loudon's work "James Scott and William Scott, Bookbinders", however the tools employed are visible on various bindings illustrated in Loudon's book: the Greek key roll on the boards, the floral roll on the boards and the urn cornerpieces.
ShelfmarkBdg.s.949
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography; J. H. Loudon "James Scott and William Scott Bookbinders" (London, 1980)
Acquired on12/11/10
AuthorAnderson, William
TitleLandscape Lyrics
Imprint[London]
Date of Publication1838
LanguageEnglish
NotesWilliam Anderson (1805-1866) was born at Edinburgh. His maternal grandfather was the author of the 'Natural History of the Mineral Kingdom' and his brother John was the historian of the house of Hamilton. Apart from newspaper contributions, his first publication was 'Poetical Sketches' in 1833. By 1838 he was living in London where he moved in literary circles. Later he returned to Scotland, continuing to publish and working for Scottish newspapers. The DNB characterizes Anderson's poetry as 'generally sweet and tuneful' but 'not characterized by much merit of a literary kind'. These 'Landscape Lyrics' are typical mid-19th century verse in their style and subject. This copy, however, is of particular interest, being the author's proof copy of the first edition, without title page or plates. As the bookseller's catalogue says, 'These pleasantly messy proofs were evidently corrected currente calamo as they came off the press'. As such, they are a good example of writing and publishing practices of the period, and complement the Library's holdings of publisher's archives in this regard. A copy of the publication in its final state is at AB.8.83.5, which would make an interesting comparison.
ShelfmarkAPS.4.204.47
Reference SourcesDNB; Bookseller's catalogue.
Acquired on26/01/04
AuthorAndreini, Giovanni Battista.
TitleLa Florinda, Tragedia
ImprintMilan: Girolamo Bordone
Date of Publication1606
LanguageItalian
NotesRare first edition of this illustrated tragedy, the first work for the stage and the only tragedy by Giovanni Battista Andreini (1579-1654), regarded as the most important Italian dramatist of the 17th century. Andreini is considered especially important as a link between the Commedia dell' arte tradition, with its mixing of dialects and improvisational tendencies, and the emerging genre of opera. The tragedy is set in a Scottish forest (pictured on an illustrated plate), with the plot centering on a domestic tragedy cocnerning Ircano king of Scotland and his wife Florinda, countess of "Angusa" (Angus?). Tha play ends typically with a succession of suicides.
ShelfmarkRB.m.678
Acquired on07/07/08
AuthorAndrew Sharp & Sons
TitleCatalogue of Iron & Brass Bedsteads, Child's Cots, Bed Chairs, &c.
ImprintGlasgow: John F. Gourlie, Lith.
Date of Publicationc. 1900
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a sumptuous trade catalogue with 53 lithographed plates, most of them partly printed in colour. Brass and wrought iron are much in evidence; no flat-pack self-assembly kits here. Judging by the size and solidity of the beds illustrated here, some are probably still around today. The Campbellfield Bedstead Works were built for Andrew Sharp in 1876, and were in Campbellfield Street in central Glasgow. This copy comes with three price lists dated 1901, one with manuscript corrections.
ShelfmarkAB.10.207.07
Acquired on28/03/07
AuthorAnnan, John.
TitlePhotographs of excavations at the Roman fort of Castlecary.
ImprintGlasgow
Date of Publication1902
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a well-preserved album of 16 photographs of excavations along part of the Antonine Wall at Castlecary in Stirlingshire. John Annan (1862-1947) was the older son of Thomas Annan (1829-1887) and a member of the family firm of photographers. John specialized in architectural photography and was known for his photographs of Glasgow slums. These photographs were taken during the excavation of Castlecary fort between March and November 1902. It appears that Annan took these photographs for the article published in volume 37 of the Proceedings of the Scottish Society of Antiquaries (1902-1903). This album was owned by the Glasgow Archaeological Society, who conducted excavations along the Antonine Wall from 1890. The fort at Castlecary was one of only two defences (from a total of 15), along the 37 mile-long wall, enclosed by stone walls as distinct from ramparts of stone or clay. The archaeological evidence suggests it was built while Agricola was governor between 77 and 84 A.D., prior to the construction of the wall during the middle of the second century. The earliest notice of the fort is probably in an anonymous letter of 1697 describing an excursion to the west of Edinburgh. Castlecary fort was plundered for stone during the construction of the Forth-Clyde Canal in 1770 and was dissected by the Edinburgh-Glasgow railway around 1840. The outer boundary has been further damaged by the main Glasgow to Stirling road (A80).
ShelfmarkPhot.la.24
Reference SourcesRobertson, Anne. The Antonine Wall. (Glasgow: Glasgow Archaeological Society, 1990) HP2.90.7857 Hanson, William S. and Maxwell, Gordon S. Rome's north west frontier: the Antonine Wall. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh Press, 1983) H3.83.2259 Christison, D., Buchanan, M. and Anderson, J. 'Excavation of Castlecary fort on the Antonine vallum' in Proceedings of the Scottish Society of Antiquaries 37 (1902-1903), p. 271-346. SCS.SASP.37
Acquired on04/04/02
AuthorAnnan, Thomas.
TitlePhotographic views of Loch Katrine and of some of the principal works constructed for introducing the water of Loch Katrine into the city of Glasgow.
ImprintGlasgow: [Glasgow Corporation Water Works],
Date of Publication1889
LanguageEnglish
NotesLoch Katrine, a freshwater loch in the Trossach hills north of Glasgow, was identified in 1853 by John Frederick Bateman, a civil engineer employed by the Glasgow Corporation, as a potential source of clean drinking water for the city. Glasgow had in the previous fifty years suffered major cholera and typhus epidemics due to overcrowding, poor sanitation and a lack of reliable water supply for the majority of its inhabitants. Despite strong opposition, a bill was passed in the House of Lords in 1855 authorising work to go ahead on the construction of a waterworks on the loch. Four years later the works was opened by Queen Victoria; they made a substantial difference to the health of the city. They cost around 1.5 million, a huge sum for those days, but were a major source of civic pride for Glasgow. The Glasgow Corporation Water Works engaged the Glasgow-based photographer, Thomas Annan (1829-1887) to provide a photographic record of the waterworks and the various aqueduct bridges and reservoirs built to facilitate the supply of water to Glasgow, 34 miles away. "Photographic views of Loch Katrine", which consisted of 28 albumen prints by Annan, with accompanying text and in a special binding, was first published in 1877. The book was presumably a limited edition as each copy appears to have been presented by the Lord Provost and members of the Water Committee to local worthies. This is a second issue of the book, dated 1889, with a new title page and five additional prints, which are all group photographs of the Glasgow Corporation Water Commissioners on visits to the Gorbals Water Works and Loch Katrine between 1880 and 1886. As with the 1877 issue it appears to have been produced for presentation by the Lord Provost to prominent individuals. This particular copy was presented to one 'Robert Anderson', probably the local businessman and one-time bailie of Glasgow, Robert Anderson (b. 1846).
ShelfmarkPhot.med.117
Reference SourcesA. Aird, Glimpses of Old Glasgow, Glasgow, 1894 (http://gdl.cdlr.strath.ac.uk/airgli/index.html)
Acquired on30/04/10
AuthorAnon
TitleThe speeches of the six condemn'd Lords at their tryals in Westminster-Hall.
Imprint[London: s.n.]
Date of Publication1716
LanguageEnglish
NotesAfter the failure of the Jacobite rising in 1715/16, the British government was quick to dispense justice to those who took a prominent role in the rising, most notably to members of the aristocracy who might pose a future risk to the recently established Hanoverian monarchy. This rare broadside gives the text of speeches by six Jacobite lords in the House of Lords on 18-19 January 1716 after they had been impeached for treason. Four of these six lords, who all pleaded guilty, were Scots: William Maxwell, 5th Earl of Nithsdale, Robert Dalzell, 5th Earl of Carnwath, William Gordon, 6th Viscount Kenmure, and William Nairne, 2nd Lord Nairne. The other two were English, Baron Widdrington, and the Earl of Derwentwater, leader of the uprising in the north of England. All six of them were sentenced to death but four of them received reprieves, and only Kenmure and Derwentwater, who both had military commands in the rising, were actually beheaded on Tower Hill on 24 February 1716. The broadside also gives Derwentwater's last speech before his execution, in which he regretted having pleaded guilty and reasserted his loyalty to the Jacobite cause. Kenmure made no formal speech before his death. He is recorded as expressing regret that he had not had time to order a black suit to die in and for having accepted George I's authority by pleading guilty. In a letter apparently written to a fellow peer the night before his execution, he explained that a formal scaffold speech on his allegiances might damage Carnwath's chances of obtaining a pardon and he stressed that he was a protestant, acting purely from loyal duty to James, the exiled son of King James II/VII. The broadside has three crude woodcut illustrations, which bear little relation to the events described in the text below. Only one other, imperfect, copy of this broadside is recorded by ESTC, in the Bodleian library. This particularly copy was part of the collection of the 17th earl of Perth, sold at auction in 2012.
ShelfmarkRB.l.279
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on31/08/12
AuthorAnon
TitleThe coppy of a letter sent from the Earle of Traquere in Ireland the third of October 1641
ImprintLondon: [s.n.]
Date of Publication1641
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a rare pamphlet (5 other copies recorded in ESTC), printed in late 1641 as political and civil unrest were increasing in England and the rest of the British Isles as a prelude to the Civil War that broke out the following year. It is an attack on two prominent Scots of the period, John Stewart, first earl of Traquair (b. 1599-1659) and "Old Father Philips", Robert Philip(s), a Scottish Catholic priest based in King Charles's court in London. The pamphlet reproduces a letter, dated 3 October, 1641, supposedly written by Traquair from Dublin to Philip, which had been intercepted and the contents subsequently disclosed. By the beginning of October 1641, plans were well underway for armed uprising led by the Irish Catholic gentry against the English administration in Ireland. Armed revolt broke out later that month in various places in Ireland, resulting in the killing and expulsion of Protestant settlers in the north. In the letter Traquair reports on the plans for the uprising to Philip, the latter being described as "a loyall and constant friend to Rome". There is no evidence that Traquair was in Ireland at that time or had any role in the uprising. The printing of the pamphlet appears to be connected to the unpopularity of Traquair and Philip in Scotland and England. The former, as King Charles's man in Scotland, had found himself in the impossible role of trying to reconcile covenanters to their monarch's autocratic rule while trying to implement his episcopalian policies. In 1641 the Scottish parliament forced the king to remove him as lord high treasurer of Scotland, subsequently denouncing him as one of five principal 'incendiaries' in the country. Traquair, although a Protestant, was also thought to have Catholic sympathies, which would later, in 1644, lead the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland to declare him an 'enemy to religion'. Robert Philip (c.15801647) was a prominent member of King Charles's royal household, acting as chaplain and confessor to the queen and as informal head of a group of Scottish Catholic nobles at the court. In 1640 he was accused by the English parliament of leading a popish conspiracy at court and influencing young Prince Charles towards popery. The House of Lords also wanted him to answer charges of inciting rebellion in Ireland. He was subsequently imprisoned in the Tower of London for a year which left him easy prey for attacks such as this pamphlet. As with Traquair, there is no evidence that Philip was involved in fomenting discord in Ireland.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2861
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on24/05/13
AuthorAnon
TitleThe bird-fancier's companion; or, a true and easy way of hatching and bringing forth canary birds. 2nd ed.
ImprintEdinburgh: A. Donaldson & J. Reid for William Coke,
Date of Publication1763
LanguageEnglish
NotesOnly two other copies of this book on canaries are recorded in ESTC and no first edition is recorded anywhere. The text is taken from a work first printed in London "A new way of breeding canary birds" (1742), which was also reissued as the second part of "The bird fancier's necessary companion and sure guide" (London, 1760-62). The work opens with chapters on the different breeds of canary and about how to make the best choice from the birds imported into "England" by German traders. The import of caged birds into Scotland is likely to have been though Leith, at that time the main entry point in Scotland for foreign goods, which would explain why the book was printed for a Leith-based bookseller, William Coke. The book goes on to cover breeding of canaries, health tips and how to make them sing. It closes with a section on native wild birds which were often kept as caged birds: skylarks, goldfinches and linnets. The book is illustrated with a frontispiece and a plate showing how to set up a bird trap, as well as three plates depicting the three aforementioned native song birds. The plates were engraved by Edinburgh-based Thomas Phinn (1728-c.1770).
ShelfmarkRB.s.2851
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on31/08/12
AuthorAnon.
TitleObservations on illicit distillation and smuggling: with some remarks on the reports of Woodbine Parish Esq. chairman of the excise board, on that subject.
ImprintEdinburgh: David Willison
Date of Publication1816
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a rare pamphlet, with only two other copies located in major libaries in the UK and USA. The anonymous author is almost certainly a Scot, who takes issue here with Woodbine Parish (1768-1848), a London merchant who served as chairman of the board of excise for Scotland, 181523. The author criticises Parish's report on distillation and smuggling, in particular the remarks on the Scots' propensity for drunkenness and the belief that the increase in illegal distilling had nothing to with the increase in alcohol duty. The author in this pamphlet provides a good snapshot of Scottish drinking practices and smuggling activities of the period. For the author, the poorly-framed laws made in Westminster, which ignore the social and economic realities of life of Scotland, are the main reasons for the increase in illegal distillation and smuggling.
ShelfmarkAB.2.213.22
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on22/06/12
AuthorAnon.
TitleA full and true account of the cruel and inhuman behaviour of a certain late M[ember]r of P[arliament] to his lady
Imprint[London? : s.n.]
Date of Publication1785?
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis unrecorded broadside from 1785 or 1786 reports on events preceding the abduction of Mary Bowes, countess of Strathmore(1749-1800) by her second husband. Mary's first husband, the ninth earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, had died in 1776. The following year she married Andrew Robinson Stoney Bowes (1747-1810), against better advice, but was canny enough to sign an antenuptial trust preventing him from having any control over her fortune. Stoney, having taken her family name of Bowes, quickly found about the document and forced her to revoke it. He proved to be a violent and abusive husband and eventually, after eight years together, Mary escaped from him in February 1785, going into hiding in London under a false name. She then filed for divorce on the grounds of his ill-treatment of her. This broadside outlines her reasons for doing so, giving examples of Bowes's cruelty, and repeats her request for a restraining order against her husband "for the preservation of this exhibitant's life and person from bodily harm". Mary's worst fears were to be realised in November 1786, when Bowes had her abducted and taken to the north of England where she was cruelly treated and received death threats. She escaped, and Bowes was arrested and he and his accomplices were arrested and put on trial for the kidnapping. The trial thrilled and scandalised contemporary Georgian society, who to begin with firmly sympathised with the countess. Bowes was found guilty and sentenced to three years in prison. In the course of this trial and at subsequent trials, which dealt with the control of the Strathmore estate and Mary's divorce proceedings, details of the countess's own excesses and licentious behaviour began to leak out, which changed the public mood against her.
ShelfmarkAP.4.213.08
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on26/07/13
AuthorAnonymous
TitleThomas Edwards, England's, and North-Britain's, Happiness
ImprintLondon
Date of Publication1709
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis rare pamphlet makes a unique contribution to the debates over the Union of 1707. The writer argues that the great happiness brought by the union can be easily demonstrated by comparing conditions in modern England to, for instance, the reign of Henry III (!). The writer claims that the settlement has clarified the workings of the constitution, particularly as regards the militia, and supports Thomas Orme's Former Prints for a Standing Army (1707). The text goes on to claim that the Church of England is now freer from popery than at any time since the reign of Henry VIII, and warns solemnly against tolerating the Dissenters. In order to make this point further, the editor goes on to reprint the epistle from Thomas Edwards' Gangraena (1646) in which toleration is denounced. The 'imprimatur' from James Cranford on p. 32, which precedes the extract from Edwards' work, is simply an imprimatur from an edition of Edwards. At p. 33 the writer continues to discourse on religion and the state of the church, quoting from other sources to suggest that the Kirk of Scotland should conform to the Church of England. The writer clearly feels that Scotland has failed to make a proper contribution to the Union, remarking on the last page that only divine intervention prevented the Pretender from successfully taking Scotland in 1708, when 'North-Britain was so out of capacity to resist an invading Foe'. As a political argument, this work is amusingly illogical and disordered, but its references to other pamphlets create an interesting picture of literary debates in Britain in the early eighteenth century. This copy is striking for its condition, being uncut, unopened and stitched as issued. ESTC records just eight other copies (ESTC T32653). Collation: 4o, A-D4, a-b4, E-G4
ShelfmarkRB.s.2074
Acquired on17/01/01
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