Important acquisitions

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Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 864 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

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Important Acquisitions 241 to 255 of 864:

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Author[William Bailey]
Title[Collection of printed and manuscript material relating to a dinner held in honour Provost William Bailey]
ImprintEdinburgh? : s.n.
Date of Publication1848
LanguageEnglish
NotesA "rich and elegant bound album" consisting of printed and manuscript material relating to a dinner held on 24 August 1848 in honour of William Bailey (d. 1859), first Provost of Portobello, a town on the outskirts of Edinburgh, now part of the city. Having worked in the flint glass trade in Newcastle, William Bailey came to Portobello about 1826 and in 1829 bought the chemical works there as a site for the manufacture of cut glass crystal and flint glassware. He built up a successful business manufacturing tumblers, decanters and other household articles, but, faced with increasing competition from glass factories in Leith and Edinburgh, Bailey decided in 1848 to convert the works to the more profitable manufacture of green bottles. In 1833 he was made the first Provost of Portobello and the old Leith-Dalkeith road was renamed Baileyfield Road after his house, Baileyfield, built about 1836. This album was presented to Bailey at the dinner and is in a handsome calf binding by Robert Seton of Edinburgh.
ShelfmarkBdg.m.178
Reference Sourceshttp://www.scotlandsglass.co.uk/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=56&Itemid=44
Acquired on29/04/17
Author[William Douglas]
TitleThe cornutor of seventy-five. Being the genuine narrative of the lives, adventures and amours of Don Ricardo Honeywater. The second edition.
ImprintLondon: J. Cobham
Date of Publication[1748]
LanguageEnglish
NotesA very rare satirical pamphlet by William Douglas (b. 1710/11?), a Scottish doctor who had a prominent medical career in London; at one time he was employed as physician to Frederick, Prince of Wales. Douglas's main claim to fame, or rather notoriety, was not his skill as a physician but the vindictive attacks he made in print on some of the leading physicians of his day. Having already attacked his fellow Scots William Smellie and Thomas Thompson, he turned his attention to the wealthiest, most famous and respected physician in England, Richard Mead (1673-1754). Although already in his seventies, Mead had acquired a reputation for womanising, or rather nocturnal 'impotent fumblings' with young girls of much lower social status. His extra-marital activities and alleged inflated status in the medical world were targeted by Douglas in the first edition of this pamphlet, where Mead punningly became 'Don Ricardo Honeywater'. In 1748 Douglas also produced this expanded second edition, with mock-learned footnotes and enlarged preface and an attack on Mead's translator, Dr Thomas Stack, 'Dr Chimney'. Douglas's pamphlet attracted a powerful response in defence of Mead: "Don Ricardo Honeywater Vindicated", a work attributed to another Scottish doctor and man of letters, Tobias Smollett. It seems to have put an end to Douglas's career as satirist; he later gave up his medical career in London and by 1758 he had returned to Scotland and, according to William Smellie, had gone mad.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2638(1)
Reference SourcesESTC; DNB; R.A. Day, The cornutor of seventy-five and Don Ricardo Honeywater vindicated, The Augustan Reprint Society publication no. 224-225, Los Angeles, 1987
Acquired on24/11/06
Author[William Henry Dick-Cunyngham]
Title[Album of 94 albumen prints]
ImprintS.n, s.d.
Date of Publication[c. 1875 - c.1882]
LanguageEnglish
NotesAn album of 94 albumen prints probably compiled by William Henry Dick-Cunyngham (1851-1900). Dick-Cunyngham served with the Gordon Highlanders in India then Afghanistan, winning a Victoria Cross in the Second Afghan War of 1878-80. The album contains photographs relating to his time in India, as well as views of the family home at Prestonfield House in Edinburgh, all of which are captioned. The first half of the album comprises commercially produced views in India and towards the end are a few commercial Scottish views by Valentine and Wilson. In between are photographs that relate specifically to army regiments, including an interesting series of military group portraits identified as: pipers, 93rd Sutherland Highlanders, Windsor 1882; group of Sutherland Highlanders (93rd?); officers of the Sutherland Highlanders including Colonel MacPherson and Colonel Nightingale; Captain Dick-Cunyngham VC, Gordon Highlanders and the men of his company, taken at Edinburgh Castle. The photographs showing Dick-Cunyngham and companions posing with hunting trophies may have been taken by John Burke (1843-1900), a leading commercial photographer based in North-West India who is best known for his photographs taken during the Second Afghan War (two of the photographs in this album show men and officers of the 92nd Highlanders in Kabul in 1880). Dick-Cunyngham went on to serve in the Boer War in South Africa where he died of wounds incurred in action at Wagon Hill in Natal.
ShelfmarkPhot.la.69
Reference SourcesJ. Falconer " India: Pioneering Photographers 1850-1900" London, 2001. Auction catalogue.
Acquired on21/04/08
Author[William Hugh Logan & Robert Henry Wyndham]
TitleLittle Bo-Peep; or, Harlequin and The Little Girl that Lost her Sheep. A Pastoral Pantomime + St. George & ye Dragon; or, Harlequin and Ye Seven Champions of Christendom. A Grand Comic Christmas Pantomime, 1857-58
Imprint[Edinburgh]: Theatre Royal
Date of Publication1857-58
LanguageEnglish
NotesThese are two unrecorded printed scripts of Christmas pantomimes, each produced for one of Wyndham's two Edinburgh theatres and written by Logan. Both works contain early lithographed illustrations by Keeley Haswelle (1832-1891), an English artist and book illustrator whose work for the Illustrated Shakespeare of Robert Chambers took him to Edinburgh. Henry Irving (1838-1905), later to become the most famous actor in Victorian Britain, appeared in both plays. He was then a 19-year-old and only a year into his long, 15-year theatrical apprenticeship, having first appeared on the Edinburgh stage earlier that year. ,Although not given credit in the dramatis personae, Irving played "Captain Scruncher, of the Wolves" in the production of Little Bo-Peep. What role he played in St. George & ye Dragon is unclear. He remained with the Wyndhams as "juvenile lead" until September 1859.
ShelfmarkAB.3.216.04(1-2)
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on22/07/16
Author[William Sotheby]
TitleTo His Majesty's ship Barham, appointed by the King to convey Sir Walter Scott to Naples.
Imprint[London : s.n.]
Date of Publication1831
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis single sheet poem of 42 lines is by 'W.S.', William Sotheby (1757-1833), a poet and translator. The poem is dated 18 November 1831 at the end, with the address of Fair Mead Lodge, Epping Forest, which had been Sotheby's home since the early 1790s. Sotheby had been in the army in his youth and had been stationed in Edinburgh in the 1770s, where he came to know Walter Scott, then only a boy. The two remained friends; Scott may not have greatly esteemed Sotheby's talents as a poet but he had a sincere respect for the elder man. By the summer of 1831 Scott had suffered three strokes and reluctantly agreed to go on a tour of the Mediterranean to improve his declining health. In the poem Sotheby addresses the man-of-war HMS Barham, which had been provided at the command of William IV to take Scott to Malta and Naples rather than have him undergo an arduous overland journey. The ship had set sail in October, and Sotheby anticipates its return with its precious cargo, hoping, in vain, that the famous author will return restored to full fitness. In fact, Scott had a fourth stroke on the return journey, which was overland, and by the time he reached London in June 1832 he was dying, surviving long enough to return to Scotland and to die in his beloved Abbotsford. Only one other copy of this printing is recorded, in the British Library.
ShelfmarkAP.1.215.03
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on16/10/15
Author[Winter, W. Jefferson]
TitleIn Memory of Frank Worthing Actor
ImprintNew York: [s.n.]
Date of Publication1912
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a memorial volume containing glowing tributes to the late actor Frank Worthing (1866-1910), who was born as Francis George Pentland in Edinburgh. Worthing became a student at Edinburgh University with a view to a career in medicine but by 1884 abandoned his studies in favour of the stage. By the late 1880s he had made it to London and was securing leading roles there, acting alongside the likes of Lily Langtry, before moving on to the USA in 1894. He worked in America for the rest of his career, in latter years playing the leading man in productions with the actress Grace George. Worthing collapsed when stepping on stage in Detroit for the opening act of the comedy "Sauce for the Goose", and died shortly afterwards. He had been suffering from tuberculosis for a number of years but had insisted on carrying on acting, despite collapsing on stage on two previous occasions. One of his notable roles was as Lieutenant Pinkerton in the original 1900 production of "Madame Butterfly", the play which would later be adapted by Puccini for his famous opera. Among the contributors to the volume is the actor Tyrone Power, Sr. (father of the well-known Hollywood actor of the same name). The printing of the volume was organised by W. Jefferson Winter (1878-1929), an American actor and friend of Worthing. Winter's father, the drama critic William Winter (1836-1917), supplied a brief biography and elegy for the deceased. This copy contains the bookplate of the author Eric Salmon, and of the American printer William Frederick de Dopff Morey (b. 1858).
ShelfmarkPB4.209.34/6
Reference SourcesNY Times Digital archive
Acquired on09/02/09
AuthorA Lady
TitleThe ladies' science of etiquette by a lady
ImprintEdinburgh: Paton and Ritchie
Date of Publicationc1850
LanguageEnglish
NotesVictorian society was famously governed by strict codes of etiquette which were supposed to be the defining marks of members of polite society. This meant that many guides to these rules were produced, aimed at those who were anxious about whether their own behaviour met these exacting standards. This is one of the rarest surviving examples of such a conduct book, in its original coloured paper covers. Although here the work is published anonymously, it seems to be a reprint, originally written by the author and socialite Baroness E.C. de Calabrella, who was part of the circle surrounding the Regency dandy Count D'Orsay. This may account for the tone of this volume: where many such etiquette guides were written by and for the expanding Victorian middle class, and reflected bourgeois stolidity, The Ladies' Science of Etiquette discusses questions such as whether a lady should walk to a ball ('superlatively ridiculous' - if stuck in a provincial town without a carriage, take a sedan chair) and whether it is acceptable for a lady to carry a small dog about town ('altogether vulgar').
ShelfmarkAB.1.209.051
Reference Sourceshttp://www.worldcat.org/identities/np-calabrella,%20e%20c%20de$baroness
Acquired on30/09/09
AuthorA.B. Fleming & Co.
TitleSpecimen book of fine colours for letterpress and lithographic printers.
Imprint[Leicester: Raithby, Lawrence & Co.]
Date of Publication[1893?]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe firm A.B. Fleming & Co. was founded c. 1854 and was initially based in Salamander Street in Leith. The firm developed a technique of producing much cheaper newspaper ink which led to a rapid expansion of the business. By the 1880s they could claim to have the largest printing ink works in the world in Caroline Park, Granton, north of Edinburgh city centre. This specimen book is one a series of specimen books produced from the 1870s onwards to showcase their wares nationally and internationally. The book also includes the text of a lecture 'The chemistry of colour printing' given to the Edinburgh Branch of the British Typographia in 1891 by Robert Irvine (d. 1902), who was a chemical director of A.B. Fleming & Co. This copy has an American provenance, containing the embossed stamp of one F. Grant Schleicher, who was superintendent of the W. D. Wilson Printing Ink Company in Long Island City, N. Y.
ShelfmarkAB.2.209.23
Acquired on14/10/09
AuthorA.M. graduate in Physic [Tobias Smollett]
TitleDon Ricardo Honeywater vindicated.
ImprintLondon: E. Pen
Date of Publication[1748]
LanguageEnglish
NotesIn 1748 the eminent English physician Richard Mead was viciously attacked in print by the London-based Scot William Douglas in the pamphlet "The cornutor of seventy-five". This withering response to Douglas's pamphlet appeared in the same year and includes a comprehensive rebuttal of Douglas's aspersions and a damning biography of Douglas, referred to here as 'Doctor Salguod'. The authorship of this rare satirical pamphlet has been convincingly attributed to Tobias Smollett. As a fellow Scot in London, Smollett must have been acutely aware of the prejudices against Scots in the wake of the recent Jacobite uprising, and was anxious to prevent Douglas from stirring up more trouble by attacking the most respected medical man in England. This pamphlet is signed on the final page 'Gill Blas', the same moniker used by Smollett, who had done an English translation of Lesage's work "Gil Blas", in his pamphlet "Thomsonus Redivivus". Smollett's stout defence of Mead appears to have ended Douglas's literary career and no doubt enhanced Smollett's standing in the medical and literary community of London.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2638(2)
Reference SourcesESTC; DNB; R.A. Day, "The cornutor of seventy-five and Don Ricardo Honeywater vindicated", The Augustan Reprint Society publication no. 224-225, Los Angeles, 1987
Acquired on24/11/06
AuthorAbercrombie, John.
TitleEvery man his own gardener.
ImprintLondon: Printed for W. Griffin,
Date of Publication1767
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis book is a rare copy of the first edition of John Abercrombie's most popular work. Abercrombie (1726-1806) from Prestonpans, near Edinburgh was the son of a market gardener, whom he worked for from the age of 14. In 1751 he went to London and worked at Kew Gardens, Leicester House and a host of other noblemens' gardens. At an early age, Abercrombie started the habit of noting down various horticultural observations, which formed the raw material for this book. His name does not appear on the title page or elsewhere in the publication. Instead he had asked his friend, Thomas Mawe, gardener to the Duke of Leeds in return for £20 to prefix his name to the book so that it would sell. It was a huge success and by the seventh edition of 1776, Abercrombie's name appeared on the title page.Its popularity continued for many years, a thirty-fifth edition appearing in 1857. This copy has the ownership inscription of John Lamiman, 1767 and it is possible that he had the book put into a protective chemise, possibly so he could take it out into the garden with him.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2727
Reference SourcesHenrey, Blanche. British botanical and horticultural literature before 1800. (London, 1975); Oxford Dictionary of National Biography online
Acquired on13/10/08
AuthorAbernethy, John
TitleSeelen Artzney. Das ist: Ein schoener und nuetzlicher Tractat, in welchem die Kranckheiten der Seele, ihre Ursachen, Zeichen, Zufaelle und Prognostica ordentlich beschrieben und zugleich angezeigt wird ?
ImprintHanau: David Aubry; Frankfurt: Clemens Schleichen und Peter de Zetter
Date of Publication1634
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is the second German edition of Abernethy's seminal "Christian and heavenly treatise containing Physick for the soule" of 1615; the first German translation was published in 1625. This edition is bound in contemporary vellum with blind tooling and gauffered edges. John Abernethy became Bishop of Caithness in 1616, but was deprived of the See in 1638; he died in 1639. His "Physick" deals with original sin as the source of spiritual illness, and with the cure or "Artzney" for different sins such as jealousy, impatience, fear, intemperance or hatred. The treatise is modelled on medical books detailing cures for certain diseases, and indeed draws on diseases of the body as parallels, such as the "cancer of heresy". The translator of the German edition is unknown, but he has added comments and enlarged the original English version.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2304
Reference SourcesScott, H. Fasti ecclesiae Scoticanae, 1928: |b vol. 2, p. 125
Acquired on23/07/03
AuthorAdam Ferguson
TitleSaggio sopra la storia delle societa civile [Essay on the history of civil society]
ImprintVicenza: nella stamperia Turra
Date of Publication1791-92
LanguageItalian
NotesThis is the rare (no copies recorded outside Italy) first Italian translation of Adam Ferguson's "Essay on the History of Civil Society", one of the main works of the Scottish Enlightenment, and regarded as the first work of empirical sociology in English. The work was first published in English in 1767 and made Ferguson famous as a philosopher and historian throughout Europe. The present translation, by the Vicenza-based lawyer Tomasso Cerato, is taken from the French translation of 1783. A further Italian translation was published in Venice in 1807.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2862
Acquired on21/06/13
AuthorAdam Smith
TitleThe theory of moral sentiments. 2nd edition.
ImprintLondon : A. Millar
Date of Publication1761
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is one of the 750 copies printed of the second edition of the "The theory of moral sentiments". The second edition is notable for the inclusion of replies to criticisms of the first edition by David Hume. Commonly regarded as the work that established Smith's international reputation, he himself always considered it his finest work. First published in 1759, it was an immediate success and eventually ran to six editions, the last of which Smith extensively revised just before he died in 1790. It is often said that we cannot properly understand the "Wealth of Nations" without a knowledge of "The Theory of Moral Sentiments". The other two copies of the second edition in NLS's collections are held in deposited collections, so the purchase of this copy ensures that NLS has its own copies of all the English-language editions of the work printed in the 18th century.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2854
Acquired on25/01/13
AuthorAdam Smith
TitleTheorie des sentimens moraux ou Essai analytique sur les principes des jugemens
ImprintYverdun : Pierre Kuppner
Date of Publication1799
LanguageFrench
NotesThis an unrecorded French-language edition of Adam Smith's "Theory of moral sentiments" with a Swiss imprint. It consists of the sheets of the Paris 1798 edition, which is the third translation of the work, by the marquise de Condorcet (NLS copy of this edition: ABS.2.87.36), but with new cancel title pages. The imprint is almost certainly false, as there is no record of a Pierre Kuppner publishing books in Yverdun (Yverdon-les-Bains) or anywhere else at the time. Yverdon-les-Bains in Switzerland was an intellectual and printing centre in the 18th century (a 1781 edition in French of the "Wealth of Nations" was published there), with a long established literary and typographical society, where intellectuals such as Rousseau, Pestalozzi and Fortune-Barthelemy de Felice stayed. This particular copy is in a contemporary full-leather binding and has a Polish provenance with the bookplate, dated 1821, of the Bibliotheca Sobolevskyana.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2919-2920
Reference SourcesJean Pierre Perret, "Les imprimeries d?Yverdon au XVIIe et au XVIIIe siècle" (Lausanne, 1945)
Acquired on11/12/15
AuthorAdam Smith
TitleUntersuchung ueber die Natur und die Ursachen des Nationalreichthums[Wealth of Nations]
ImprintFrankfurt and Leipzig: [s.n.]
Date of Publication1796-99
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is one of three German-language editions of Smith's "Wealth of Nations" published in the 1790s, which is a testament to the impact the work had on continental Europe. The translation is by Christian Garve, revised by August Doerrien.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2728
Acquired on14/11/08
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