Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 751 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 271 to 285 of 751:

Ordered by author
Order by title | Order by date acquired
AuthorBarclay, John
TitleEuphormionis Lusinini.
ImprintOxford: Henry Cripps,
Date of Publication1634
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is an early English edition of the works of Scottish author John Barclay (1582-1621) which consists of five separate works: both parts of his satirical work "Euphormionis Lusinini Saytricon", the "Apologia" he wrote to defend the work, his "Icon Animorum", and the "Veritatis Lachrymae", an attack on the Jesuit order, which was actually written by the French author Claude-Barthélemy Morisot. The book has been bought for its provenance. As well as marginal readers' marks, it has annotations in a 17th-century hand on the front and back pastedowns and final leaf which show that the book was also used for the conveying of messages between Scotland and England. The back pastedown has a MS list of towns in South West Scotland and North West England (presumably stops on a drove road, the distances between each of the towns in miles appear to be written next to them) and an inscription on the final leaf informs a Robert Watson that a John Andrew will be arriving in Carlisle with a "8 or 9 pack[s]" but will not be arriving until Friday, so Watson is asked to keep any packs destined for Scotland until he arrives.
ShelfmarkAB.1.210.005
Acquired on19/01/10
AuthorBarclay, John
TitleJohann Barclayens Argenis Deutsch gemacht durch Martin Opitzen.
ImprintBreslau: David Mueller
Date of Publication1626
LanguageGerman
NotesThe Scotsman John Barclay published his political novel "Argenis" in Latin in 1621, one month prior to his death. This long romance, which introduces the leading personages of international importance, has been called the prototype of a courtly roman a clef. Martin Opitz made his, the first German translation, from a French version of "Argenis" between 1626 and 1631. This two volume edition is bound in contemporary vellum over wooden boards. It has 24 engraved plates with scenic illustrations, as well as a portrait of Barclay in volume 2. Martin Opitz (1597-1639) was the foremost German Baroque poet. He was considered the authority on the best metrical pattern in all genres. Johann Christoph Gottsched called him the father of German poetry. In Vienna in 1623, Opitz was awarded the position of an imperial poet on account of an extempore poem. He received a knighthood from the Austrian Emperor in 1627. The first volume is Opitz's translation of Barclay's text, whereas the second volume contains the translation of a second instalment by A.M. de Mouchemberg.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2310
Acquired on23/07/03
AuthorBarclay, John
TitleMaximo potentissimo que monarchae, Iacobo primo ... carmen gratulatorium
ImprintLutetiae Parisiorum [Paris]
Date of Publication1603
LanguageLatin
NotesA very rare copy (there have hitherto been only two recorded copies of this work, neither of them in Scotland) of an early work by John Barclay (1582-1621), one of the foremost neo-Latin authors of his day. Although Barclay himself was born and brought up in France, his father was Scottish and he himself was proud of his Scottish ancestry. His first published work appeared in 1601 and two years later he composed this poem congratulating James VI on his accession to the throne of England and on the Union of the Crowns. The timing of the poem was propitious. In 1606 the Barclay family moved to England and Barclay was successful in gaining royal favour and financial support for his literary works, as well as carrying out diplomatic missions for James on the Continent. Barclay remained at James's court until 1615, when he moved to the papal court in Rome. The widespread popularity of Barclay's works throughout Europe is a testament to the continuing importance of Latin as a language of literature and culture in the early 17th century. The acquisition of this particular work is a worthy addition to the Library's extensive holdings of editions of Barclay's works.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2599
Reference SourcesDNB Shaaber "Checklist of Check-list of works of British authors printed abroad, in languages other than English, to 1641" (New York, 1975)
Acquired on27/04/05
AuthorBarclay, John.
TitleEuphormionis Lusinini Satyricon.
ImprintParis: Franciscum Huey,
Date of Publication1605
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is the extremely rare first edition (or at least the first surviving edition) of John Barclay's best-selling picaresque novel 'Euphormionis Lusinini Satyricon', a work dedicated to King James VI/I. Only two other copies have been recorded, both in Germany: one in Schwerin, in the Landesbibliothek Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and the other in Weimar, in the Herzogin Anna Amalia Bibliothek; however, the latter is assumed to have been destroyed in the fire there in 2004. The author John Barclay (1582-1621) was born in Lorraine, France, where his father, a Scot, worked as professor of civil law. Barclay appears to have been very proud of his Scots ancestry and is today commonly regarded as a Scottish author. He was educated at a Jesuit school in France, but he later became hostile to the order which eventually led him to write the irreverent satire 'Euphormionis Lusinini Satyricon' in c. 1605. Written in elaborate Latin prose, Barclay's first major work deals with the story of Euphormio, a citizen of an ideal realm who arrives in 17th-century Europe, and his subsequent adventures. The characters he encounters are based on contemporary figures: Neptune, a benevolent and powerful figure in the novel, is thought to be James VI/I, and Acignius, an anagram for 'Ignacius' (Ignacius Loyola) represents the Jesuits. The 'Satyricon' is now regarded as one of the most important works of prose fiction published in Europe in the early 17th century. Barclay produced a second part in 1607 with further racy adventures of Euphormio. The work was immediately successful; within his lifetime six editions of the first part and five editions of the second part appeared. Indeed around fifty editions have been identified, printed in the major countries of Europe for well over a hundred years after the initial publication date. This copy shows the text in its earliest form (there have been claims that an edition was printed in London in 1603 but no copy has been discovered). What is traditionally described as the first edition in scholarly works on Barclay is another from the same press issued in the same year, with a different pagination and the statement on the title page reading "Nunc primum recognitum, emendatum, et variis in locis auctum" (i.e. revised and enlarged). The success of the Satyricon enabled Barclay to ingratiate himself at the court of James VI/I in London, where he continued to write and act on behalf of James in literary matters. Barclay left England in 1615 to move to the papal court in Rome. He died there in 1621, in the same year his most famous and popular work, the romance 'Argenis', was published in Paris.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2758
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography; D.A. Fleming, "Euphormionis Lusinini Satyricon (Euphormio's Satyricon 1605-1607)" Nieuwkoop, 1973.
Acquired on14/08/09
AuthorBarclay, John.
TitleL' Argenide di Giovanni Barclaio.
ImprintVenetia [Venice]: Pietro Maria Bertano,
Date of Publication1636
LanguageItalian
NotesThe Library has recently acquired a number of early editions of the Franco-Scottish author John Barclay to increase its holdings of one of the most widely-read and influential literary figures of 17th-century Europe. This Italian translation of Barclay's political romance "Argenis" was made by Carl' Antonio Cocastello and edited by Christoforo Tomasini. First published in Turin in 1630, it followed another Italian translation made by Francesco Pona that was originally published in Venice in 1629. "Argenis" was Barclay's last work, completed only days before his death, and his greatest one. Composed in Rome as Barclay was working at the papal court at the time, but printed in Paris in 1621, Barclay's novel, describing the story of Princess Argenis and her suitors, offered an allegorical presentation of European history in transition from the 16th to the 17th centuries.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2803
Reference SourcesShaaber B144
Acquired on29/05/10
AuthorBarrie, J. M.
TitlePeter Pan.
Date of Publicationc.1914
LanguageEnglish
NotesTwenty large-format cards tell the story of Peter Pan. This rare set of cards may be associated with 'Peter Pan's ABC' published by Hodder and Stoughton with illustrations by Flora White around 1914. The only other known set is held at the British Library. Little is known about Flora White. Between 1915 and 1925 she illustrated other children's books, usually depicting fairies, as well as postcards with pictures of children. 'Peter Pan, or the boy who never grew up' was written by the Kirriemuir-born author J.M. Barrie and first published in 1904.
ShelfmarkRB.m.655
Acquired on06/08/07
AuthorBeatson, Alexander
TitleOn the importance of introducing agriculture in the island of St. Helena
ImprintSt. Helena: Printed by Hill and Brimmer
Date of Publication[1812]
LanguageEnglish
NotesA very rare imprint from the first commercial press to be established on the island of St. Helena, which was shortly to become famous as the last home of Napoleon Bonaparte. Alexander Beatson (1759-1830) was a Dundonian who had served as an army officer in the East India Company, writing a famous account of the war against Tippoo Sultaun which was published in 1800. After returning to live in England, Beatson was appointed to the governorship of St. Helena, a post he held from 1808-13. The island, which belonged to the East India Company, was in a very poor state. The population had nearly been wiped out by a measles epidemic and the c. 3000 survivors, a mixture of English settlers, Africans and Chinese coolies, were living in wretched conditions. Beatson set about improving the island, recognising that agriculture needed to improve not only the lot of the inhabitants but also to benefit British ships which depended on the island for fresh water and provisions when making the long voyage back from the East Indies. Agriculture was of particular interest to Beatson himself; before arriving in St Helena he had purchased 4 farms in Sussex. On his return to England he published his "Tracts relative to the island of St. Helena" which have later been descibed as major contribution to the beginnings of global environmentalism, and he continued to pursue his work in experimental agriculture on his Sussex farms right up to his death in 1830. Amongst the improvements carried out by Beatson was the introduction of a printing press, which, as can be seen with this pamphlet, was rudimentary, but which enabled him to publish 4 tracts during his time as governor and to contribute to a local periodical, the "St. Helena Monthly Register". In recognition of his achievements on the island, Beatson was promoted to the post major-general in 1813; he returned back to England a few months later.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2347
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on12/10/04
AuthorBeatson, Alexander
TitleLetter from Col. Alexander Beatson - containing remarks upon a paper lately printed; entitled "Observations relative to the island of St. Helena".
ImprintSt. Helena: Printed for Solomon and Company, by Coupland and Hill
Date of Publication[1812]
LanguageEnglish
NotesA very rare imprint from the first commercial press to be established on the island of St. Helena, which was shortly to become famous as the last home of Napoleon Bonaparte. Alexander Beatson (1759-1830) was a Dundonian who had served as an army officer in the East India Company, writing a famous account of the war against Tippoo Sultaun which was published in 1800. After returning to live in England, Beatson was appointed to the governorship of St. Helena, a post he held from 1808-13. The island, which belonged to the East India Company, was in a very poor state. The population had nearly been wiped out by a measles epidemic and the c. 3000 survivors, a mixture of English settlers, Africans and Chinese coolies, were living in wretched conditions. Beatson set about improving the island, publishing this pamphlet to correct the many errors he found in a tract by his predecessor Colonel Robert Patton. In it he gives a history of the island, of its mismanagement, his justification for his improvements, and alludes to recent difficulties, namely a garrison mutiny in 1811 which was largely brought about by the British authorities suppressing the islanders trade in arrack, a potent spirit made from palm trees. Amongst the improvements carried out by Beatson was the introduction of a printing press, which, as can be seen of this pamphlet was rudimentary, but which enabled him to publish 4 tracts during his time as governor and to contribute to a local periodical, the "St. Helena Monthly Register". In recognition of his achievements on the island, Beatson was promoted to the post major-general in 1813, he returned back to England a few months later.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2345
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on12/10/04
AuthorBeatson, Alexander.
TitleFlora Sta. Helenica
ImprintSaint Helena : J. Boyd
Date of Publication1825
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis adds to the Library's collection of material by the Dundonian Alexander Beatson (1759-1830) relating to Saint Helena. Beatson was an army officer; he had served in India and from 1808 to1813 he was governor of St .Helena. The island, which belonged to the East India Company, was in a very poor state. The population had nearly been wiped out by a measles epidemic and the c. 3000 survivors, a mixture of English settlers, Africans and Chinese coolies, were living in wretched conditions. During this time Beatson established a printing press on the island. This item is one of four works he had published. The others dealt mainly with the agriculture on the island. In recognition of his achievements on the island, Beatson was promoted to the post of major-general in 1813; he returned to England a few months later. Beatson acknowledges the contribution made towards the work by a Dr. W. Roxburgh, who compiled a catalogue of his own during a year-long stay on the island. The work also includes Roxburgh's 'Directions for taking care of growing plants at sea'. Beatson comments that the island, due to its elevation and to 'having its situation within the Tropics, possesses varieties of climate appropriate to very different plants'. He describes St Helena as being akin to a depot for plants journeying from one region to another. Unfortunately botanical knowledge was in its infancy then, and the arrival of exotic plants from other parts of the world did far more harm than good on an island which today has just over 60 endemic species. Only three copies of this work have been traced in the UK, none of which are in Scotland.
ShelfmarkRB.m.630
Acquired on18/04/06
AuthorBeatson, Alexander.
TitlePapers relating to the devastation committed by goats on the island of St. Helena.
ImprintSt. Helena : Printed for S. Solomon by J. Coupland,
Date of Publication1810
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is one of the first items printed on the island of St Helena; it addresses, among other things, the issue of the harm that could be caused to a local ecosystem by the introduction of an alien species, in this instance - goats. St Helena is a small island (47 square miles in area) in the South Atlantic Ocean, which was occupied by the English East India Company from 1658 onwards. Regarded as one of the most isolated islands in the world, it was nevertheless colonized by the English due to its important strategic position as a stop-off point for ships sailing from Asia or South Africa to Europe. In 1807 the Scottish army officer Alexander Beatson (1759-1830) was appointed as governor of the island, a post he held from 1808 to 1813. Beatson found that the island, which still belonged to the East India Company, was in a very impoverished state. He set up a series of improving measures for the island and the islanders and was able to use a printing press, which had been set up in 1806, to communicate his plans. A newspaper was printed on the island in 1807, but no book publication is recorded until 1810, with an abstract of the laws usually being regarded as the island's first publication. The present pamphlet was printed the same year, and contains the text of Beatson's proposal to print the abstract of the laws and ordinances, so may in fact precede it. The pamphlet's main text is Beatson's essay "Remarks on the evil consequences which have resulted from the introduction of goats upon the island of St. Helena". Beatson had a strong interest in agriculture and he had seen at first-hand how the introduction of goats to St Helena had greatly changed its landscape, as they had eaten much of its native vegetation and posed a constant threat to the vegetables and crops grown by the islanders. According to Beatson, goats had been introduced by the Portuguese as early as 1543, on what was then a thickly forested island. The Portuguese did not leave a permanent settlement on St Helena and the goat population had been left to grow unchecked in the absence of any natural predators. By 1809, according to Beatson, there were 1811 sheep and 2887 goats on the island, and he argues in favour of exterminating the goat population. The rest of the pamphlet consists of reports on Beatson's own agricultural experiments on the island growing cereal crops and a record of the ensuing lively debate among the islanders over whether the goat population should be exterminated or not. Beatson in his final contribution to the debate, in a minute dated 29 November 1810, suggests that until a decision on the goat issue is made by the Court of Directors of the East India Company, landowners should be allowed to shoot goats trespassing onto cultivated land, with the animals' owners being compensated five shillings per goat. The final contribution to the debate is a minute by William Doveton, a local landowner and "grazier", who was working for the East India Company. Doveton argues against total extermination of the goat population, regarding them as valuable property, but does support the culling of goats that stray onto cultivated land. Despite his failure to eradicate the goat population, Beatson continued to experiment with agriculture on the island until he left in 1813. His experiments, details of which he published in 1816 in 'Tracts relative to the island of St. Helena', have been described as a major contribution to the beginnings of global environmentalism. 200 years on St Helena continues to grapple with the problems caused by the depredations of alien species and sustaining farming in area with poor, thin soil, which is susceptible to drought. In 2012 it was reported that the legislative council of St Helena was considering an increase in the fine for letting goats (and sheep) stray on to Crown land. A rise from 25 pence to £250 was proposed, in the hope that a "more meaningful" deterrent would help protect vulnerable plants and trees. Beatson would no doubt have approved.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2880
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography; bookseller's notes
Acquired on29/11/13
AuthorBeattie, James
TitleNeue philosophische Versuche. Aus dem Englischen uebersezt. Mit einer Vorrede vonm Herrn Professor Meiners.
ImprintLeipzig: in der Weygandschen Buchhandlung
Date of Publication1779-1780
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is the first edition of the German translation of Beattie's "Essay on the nature and immutability of truth, in opposition to sophistry and scepticism; on poetry and music, as they affect the mind; on laughter, and ludicrous composition; and on the utility of classical learning". James Beattie (1735-1803) was a poet, essayist and moral philosopher. Born in Kincardine and educated at Aberdeen, he became professor of moral philosophy and logic at Marischall College, Aberdeen, in 1760. The essays assembled in this collection were written over the course of 17 years: on poetry and music in 1762, on laughter in 1764, and on classical learning in 1769. The essay on truth itself does not appear in a German translation here, only Beattie's preface to the new edition of 1776, undated additions and amendments, and an epilogue dated 1770. In his own preface to the translations, Professor Meiners refers to Beattie as the most thorough contestant of Hume's philosophy and the most fortunate defender of truth and virtue. However, he is much less complimentary about Beattie's essay on laughter and criticises Beattie for not properly distinguishing between the terms ludicrous and ridiculous.
ShelfmarkABS.1.204.029
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on11/02/04
AuthorBeattie, James
TitleVersuch über die Natur und Unveränderlichkeit der Wahreit; im Gegensatze de Klügeley und de Zweifelsucht.
ImprintCopenhagen and Leipzig: Heineck & Faber
Date of Publication1772
LanguageGerman
NotesJames Beattie's works have not stood the test of time as well as those of his contemporaries, men such as Hume and Smith, but his work was taken very seriously in its day. Beattie (1735-1803) was a poet, essayist and moral philosopher, born in Laurencekirk in Kincardine who studied Greek at Marischal College Aberdeen. From an early age he composed poetry and wrote essays which he contributed to the 'Scots Magazine'. He made a spectacular leap in his career, being a Master at Aberdeen Grammar School and from there appointed to the chair of moral philosophy and logic at Aberdeen. He is probably better remembered as a gifted poet, but it was his 'ungentle diatribe' against Hume that gained him recognition in his lifetime. As a result of his disagreement with Hume's sceptical philosophy Beattie published Essay on the Nature and Immutability of Truth, in opposition to Sophistry and Scepticism (Edinburgh, 1770). It had proved difficult to find a publisher and Beattie's friends, Sir William Forbes and Mr Arbuthnot, arranged for the book to be published and sent fifty guineas to Beattie. As a result of its loose style and pointed attack on Hume, the book found a ready audience and in four years went through five editions. It was also translated into French, German, Dutch and Italian. The present edition is the rare first German edition translated by H.W. Von Gerstenberg. It is a very good copy in full calf contemporary binding with spine gilt in compartments, raised bands.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2070
Acquired on27/12/00
AuthorBeddoe, John
Title[Collection of 42 pamphlets etc]
Imprint[Various]
Date of Publicationc. 1859-1900
LanguageEnglish
NotesJohn Beddoe (1826-1911) was born in Worcestershire but studied medicine at Edinburgh University, becoming house physician at Edinburgh Royal Infimary. He developed a keen, not to say obsessive, interest in the different ethnic or racial groups of Europe. His studies of hair and eye colour, height and physique, are among the early works of the science of anthropology. More disturbingly, his ethnological writings prepare the way for the theories of racial separation and extreme nationalism that disfigured the early twentieth century. This is a collection of some 43 pamphlets and offprints in two volumes, many inscribed by the author, perhaps to a family member or close friend. Among these are some rare provincial Scottish and English imprints, such as 'Anthropological history of Europe', Paisley, 1893. Beddoe spent much of his life in the English west country, and there are some interesting examples of Bristol printing. Many of the works have a distinct Scottish slant. Notably, his publication 'On the stature and bulk of man' has tables with details of Scottish villagers, measured with and without shoes, and weighed with and without clothes. Amusingly, Beddoe spends some time complaining that people would not always cooperate with his researches. In Scotland, the east coast fishermen proved 'extremely stubborn and suspicious', and a Glasgow manufacturer told him it was a 'waste of workmen's time'. These pamphlets fit in well with existing collections such as the Combe collection of phrenological writings. Although much of Beddoe's data is of great interest, one feels unhappy at the direction of his arguments. 'On the physical characteristics of the Jewish race' (1869) is not actually coloured by any anti-Semitic remarks, but how much did it contribute to the rise of racist pseudo-science sixty years later? This is, perhaps, the darker side of Edinburgh's contribution to science and medicine.
ShelfmarkAB.2.206.010(1-43)
Acquired on21/11/03
AuthorBell, James Stanislaus.
TitleJournal d' une residence en Circassie pendant les annees 1837, 1838, et 1839.
ImprintParis: Arthus Bertrand.
Date of Publication1841
LanguageFrench
NotesJames Stanislaus Bell (1796-1858) was a Dundee-born trader who in the 1830s started trading in Circassia, a region of the North Caucasus on the north-eastern shore of the Black Sea. Circassia had long been a key strategic location for the ongoing power struggle between the Russian, Ottoman, British and French empires. Russia wanted to expand its territory along the Black Sea coastline, while Britain and France sought to reduce Russia's ability to take advantage of the declining Ottoman presence in the area in order to protect their own trading interests in the Middle and Far East. From the 1760s onwards the Russians and local tribes living in Circassia engaged in a series of battles and wars over the territory, which were only ended in 1864 when Circassian leaders finally swore loyalty to the Russian Czar. Bell was following in the footsteps of another Scot, the diplomat David Urquhart, who in 1834 was the first Briton to champion the Circassians' cause against the Russians. Bell chartered a vessel, the "Vixen", to trade with directly with the local people and landed on the Caucasian coast in late 1836. He declared his cargo as salt, but the Russian authorities were convinced that he in fact was smuggling weapons and confiscated his ship. The Russians' suspicions may have been well-founded, given Bell's links with Urquhart and the British government's anti-Russian stance. Bell made his second trip to Circassia in 1837, accompanied by "The Times" journalist J.A. Longworth, ostensibly to negotiate reparations for the capture of his ship as the British government had publicly declined to get involved in his dispute with the Russians. He may also however have been reporting in secret to the British government on the political and military situation. He ended up staying in the region until 1839. During these years he took time to study the language, customs and traditions of the Circassians, even accompanying them on raids behind the Russian lines. Both Bell and Longworth wrote books based on their time in Circassia. Bell's work was originally published in English in 1840 as 'Journal of a residence in Circassia' and is regarded as the most comprehensive first-hand account of the Russo-Circassian wars in the latter part of the 1830s. This French translation by Louis Vivien appeared in the following year, as did a German translation. Vivien supplied an historical and geographical introduction for the French edition, which contains the same plates as used in the English edition. Bell later worked as a government agent in Central America, where his daughter married the Prussian adventurer and author Gustavus von Tempsky.
ShelfmarkAB.3.209.17
Acquired on03/04/09
AuthorBell, Thomas [pseud. of John Roberton]
TitleKalogynomia or the laws of female beauty: Being the elementary principles of that science.
ImprintLondon: J.J. Stockdale,
Date of Publication1821
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe Scottish physician John Roberton (1776-1840) was a radical and controversial figure in the medical profession. The true extent of his medical qualifications remains in doubt. He started off as a general practitioner in Edinburgh who specialised in sexually transmitted diseases. In 1809 his first major work, advocating the founding of a medical police force, "A treatise on the medical police, and on diet, regimen, &c." was published in Edinburgh. In the same year he was expelled from the Royal Medical Society for disgraceful conduct and moved to London in 1810, where he published his most famous and controversial work on reproductive system "On diseases of the generative system" the following year. Owing to his reputation and the somewhat sensational nature of the work along with its explicit illustrations, Roberton had some difficulty in finding a publisher for the work, eventually turning to John Joseph Stockdale, who himself had something of a reputation for publishing risqué material. Having ostracised himself from the Edinburgh medical fraternity and fallen foul of most of polite society, Roberton's published work was aimed at the general public who were not put off by poor reviews. He teamed up again with Stockdale to publish this work, "Kalogynomia" in 1821, using his pseudonym Thomas Bell. This work is aimed squarely at a male readership of the middle and upper classes, (this particular copy is from the library of George, Second Marquess of Milford Haven (1892-1938), containing his armorial bookplate); it is ostensibly a guide to the beauty of the female sex, but in reality it is a sex manual. As with his earlier work "On diseases of the generative system", Roberton covers sexual health and generation, with chapters discussing beauty and love, before turning to a more detailed discussion of sexual intercourse, and 'the laws regulating that intercourse'. He concludes his work with a 'Catalogue Raisonné of the defects in female beauty'. A number of plates depict both the male and female sexual organs, and indeed a note of caution is included in the plate description: "Plates 10, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24 should not be carelessly exposed either to Ladies or to Young Persons ... As the work is a scientific one, and calculated both by its mode of construction and by its price for the higher and more reflecting class of readers, and as the Plates above are enumerated are also entirely scientific and anatomical, the publisher might have dispensed with this precaution; but he is anxious that these readers should have it in their power to obviate the possibility of careless exposure of such anatomical plates: they are therefore detached from the work, and may be locked up separately" (p. i). It seems, rare, therefore, to find these plates present as here, bound in throughout the text. Roberton's decision to use a pseudonym and his warning about the graphic nature of some of the illustrations used in the book, clearly reflect the pressures that he and Stockdale felt in light of the public reaction to their previous collaboration. The work provides a fascinating insight into early nineteenth century sexual thought, revealing the sensitivity over the publication of works dealing with such matters, and the fine line in the debate of what was considered to be medical or sexual, anatomical or pornographical.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2799
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on08/10/10
Important Acquisitions - page no. 1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12     13     14     15     16     17     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     27     28     29     30     31     32     33     34     35     36     37     38     39     40     41     42     43     44     45     46     47     48     49     50     51