Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 751 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

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Important Acquisitions 331 to 345 of 751:

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AuthorCardinal John Henry Newman
TitleMy campaign in Ireland
ImprintAberdeen: A. King & Co.
Date of Publication1896
LanguageEnglish
NotesPosthumously published six years after Cardinal Newman's death in 1890, "My campaign in Ireland" brings together in print form some of the key papers produced by Newman and colleagues in the 1850s in their efforts to establish the first Catholic university in Ireland (which would later become University College Dublin). Newman had become involved in the campaign for a university in 1851 as the Catholic Church sought to provide an alternative to the new non-denominational Queen's Colleges in Ireland established by the British government. Over the next few years he made several trips across to Ireland, having to overcome resistance to the project among some Irish bishops and nationalists. The university was eventually founded in 1854 with Newman becoming its first rector. He eventually resigned the post in 1858, finding his dual roles of provost of the Birmingham Oratory and rector of the university to be too demanding. The book was put together by Newman's secretary, friend and literary executor, Father William Paine Neville (1824-1905), possibly as part of an attempt to defend Newman's reputation, which had come under attack in the years following his death. Although the title page mentions that this is only Part 1, no further parts were published. The book also includes a separately paginated work at end "Note on Cardinal Newman's preaching and influence at Oxford". It was printed by Arthur King & Co., printers to Aberdeen University, but was only intended for private circulation. This particular copy was formerly part of the library of St.Augustine's Abbey in Ramsgate, Kent.
ShelfmarkAB.2.212.03
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on09/12/11
AuthorCarlyle, Thomas
TitleRevolucija Francuska
ImprintBelgrade: Narodno delo, n.d.
Date of Publication-
LanguageSerbian
NotesThis is a translation into Serbian of Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution. Carlyle (1795-1881) was born in Dumfriesshire; The French Revolution: a history was first published in London in 1837. It is one of his most famous works - partly because of the story that the original manuscript was accidentally thrown by a servant into the fire. The translation is by Mihailo Dobric. This appears to be the first edition of this translation; it is not dated, but was probably produced some time between 1930 and 1950. It has a particularly striking cover design by the Croatian artist Mirko Racki (1879-1982), of black cloth stamped with figures engaging in revolutionary activities, appropriately blocked in red, white and blue. The spines are also decorated with gilt lettering and a design of green leaves, white ribbons and red axes.
ShelfmarkHB2.207.6.218
Acquired on25/05/07
AuthorCarlyle, Thomas
TitleOliver Cromwell's Letters and Speeches (2 vols. and Supplement)
ImprintLondon: Chapman and Hall
Date of Publication1845
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe NLS already has later editions of this work, but this was an opportunity to acquire a first edition with interesting provenance. The half-title of the first volume is inscribed 'To Miss Wilson with many kind regards. T.C' in Carlyle's unmistakable hand, and a later hand notes that the volume was 'given to F.J. Conance Esq. as a Memorial from J.W. 1872'. This 'Miss Wilson' is probably Jane Wilson, 1790-1890, friend of Harriet Martineau, who with her brother Thomas began a friendship with Carlyle around 1836, when they suggested a lecture series to him. (Kaplan, pp. 239-240). Carlyle and his wife Jane wrte to the Wilsons and mention them in their letters of the period: in 1845, the year this book was published, Miss Wilson is chiefly notable for an unlucky dinner invitation which Carlyle complained about and tried to get out of.
ShelfmarkABS.3.203.007
Reference SourcesCollected Letters of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle, Duke-Edinburgh Edition. Fred Kaplan: Thomas Carlyle, A Biography. CUP 1983
Acquired on08/04/03
AuthorCarmichael, Henry.
TitleHints relating to emigrants and emigration; embracing observations and facts intended to display the real advantages of New South Wales, as a sphere for the successful exercise of industry.
ImprintLondon D. Walther,
Date of Publication1834.
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the first of three editions of an early work on emigration to Australia by Henry Carmichael (d. 1862), a schoolmaster and educational theorist, and former student of St. Andrew's University. In 1830 he was recruited in London by Scottish emigre John Dunmore Lang as a teacher for Lang's proposed Presbyterian secondary school in Sydney, the Australian College. Lang, Carmichael and three other licentiates of the Church of Scotland opened the College soon after their arrival in Australia in 1831. Carmichael, when his contract as a 'professor' at the College expired, set up his own school in Sydney, the Normal Institution (1834-38). He also founded in 1833 the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts, the first of its kind in the colony, and was prominent believer in advanced educational ideas for the colony. In this work Carmichael states that "the necessity of emigration from Great Britain, under the present circumstances, seems questionless", the "present circumstances" being the increasing population of Britain and the growing misery among its working classes. He does, however, counsel would-be emigrants against "harbouring undue notions of the success and enjoyment which await them on setting foot in this territory"; he recognises that courage, perseverance and thrift are needed to flourish in Australia. This copy has the bookplate of James Edge-Partington (1854-1930) a British anthropologist and member of the Polynesian Society, who collected books on Oceania, and a blind stamp of Sir Thomas Meek Ramsay (1907-1995), a prominent Australian philanthropist and book collector.
ShelfmarkAB.1.209.048
Reference SourcesAustralian Dictionary of Biography (online edition)
Acquired on07/10/09
AuthorCarnegie, Andrew
TitleGospel of wealth.
Imprint[London]
Date of Publication[1890]
LanguageEnglish
Notes'The gospel of wealth' was first published as a pair of articles - 'Wealth' and 'The best fields for philanthropy' in the 'North American Review' in 1889. W.T. Stead, better known subsequently as editor of 'The books for the bairns' re-titled the first article 'The gospel of wealth' when it was reprinted in the 'Pall Mall Gazette' in 1890. Ten years later, Carnegie had published his most famous work, a collection of magazine articles, under the title 'The gospel of wealth'. In the first article, Carnegie, the Dunfermline-born philanthropist, addresses the question of the administration and disposal of wealth, concluding with the then novel idea that the rich man should give away his fortune while he is still alive and asserting that 'the man who dies ...rich, dies disgraced'. W.E. Gladstone was one of a number of prominent individuals, who praised this article and urged its wide circulation in Britain. The erstwhile Prime Minister did have some reservations about 'The best fields for philanthropy', in which Carnegie listed the best ways in which millionaires should dispose of their largesse --establishing universities, libraries, hospitals and financing public parks, swimming baths, concert halls and churches. This is a presentation copy from the author to Cardinal Henry Manning, which forms part of a diverse collection of sixteen pamphlets on socialism and 'labour' in general published worldwide between 1873 and 1891. Manning was well known as a champion of the poor and in 1889 had played a major role in mediating between the opposing factions in the London Dock Strike. In dealing with the problem of the abuse of money and power, in an article entitled 'Irresponsible wealth' published in the 'Nineteenth century' in December 1890, Manning was indirectly criticising Carnegie's Darwinian approach to economics.
ShelfmarkABS.3.201.001(6)
Acquired on05/12/00
AuthorCarrick, William & Eurenius & Quist.
Title[Album of Russian and Scandinavian photographs from the 1860s and 1870s]
Imprint[S.l., s.n.]
Date of Publicationc. 1870
Languagen/a
NotesThis unusual album contains 48 albumen prints, from around the 1860s and 70s. They are mostly portraits and have been hand-coloured. It includes 10 Russian 'types', together with a few Moscow and St. Petersburg views, almost all by William Carrick (1827-1878), the Scot who for twenty years ran a successful studio in St. Petersburg and was particularly known for depicting Russian life. There is also a series of photographs by the Swedish court photographers Eurenius & Quist depicting the regional costumes of Scandinavia. The firm was established by W.A. Eurenius and P.L. Quist in Stockholm in 1858 and continued through the 1860s and 1870s. Their studio was highly esteemed and is believed to have been among the earliest professional photographic businesses in Sweden. There are also in the album uncoloured portraits of Karl XV and Queen Louise of Sweden by Hanson of Stockholm; Crown Prince Oscar of Sweden and Princess Sofia, by Eurenius and Quist; Crown Prince Frederick of Denmark and Princess Louise; and, rather incongruously a photograph of Grey's Monument in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, produced by the local firm of P.M. Laws, which is possibly a later addition to the album. The binding of the album is particularly interesting and it points to the original owner of the album being Russian. Lacquered boards have been attached on to the original album covers, with the upper cover painted to show a seated man playing the balalaika and a couple dancing.
ShelfmarkPhot.sm.147
Reference SourcesAuction catalogue
Acquired on15/10/10
AuthorCassina, Ubaldo
TitleUbaldi Cassina in Parmensi Lyceo Moralis Philosophiae Regii Profressoris De Morali Disciplina Humanae Societatis.
ImprintParmae : Ex Typographia Regia
Date of Publication1778
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is a rare first edition of Ubaldo Cassina's comprehensive survey of ethics. Cassina (1736-1824) was a professor or moral philosophy at Parma. This work is intended primarily as a guide for students, and is divided into two sections, each of which deals with one of the main concerns of moral philoso[hy of the period. The first part discusses man in the "state of nature". Cassina cites Locke, Grotius, Gerdil, Malebranche and also the Scottish philosophers Francis Hutcheson (1694-1746) and David Hume (1711-1776). The second part examines the development of society, and discusses the reasons for the formation of human societies, the nature of the fundamental laws which govern them, the importance of justice, temperance, work and the love of glory. Again, Cassina draws heavily on the work of other philosophers, in particular Plato and Aristotle, but also citing Hume's Essays Moral and Political (1741). Cassina's work clearly documents the transmission of Scottish philosophical thought throughout continental Europe in the 18th century.
ShelfmarkAB.2.204.06
Acquired on23/10/03
AuthorCastera, Desiree de
TitleNarcisse, ou le Chateau d'Arabit
ImprintParis: Dentu, Imprimeur-Libraire, Palais du Tribunal, galeries de bois, no.240
Date of Publication1804
LanguageFrench
NotesThis rare and obscure French gothic novel with a Scottish setting begins with 'miss Narcisse', who has reached the age of eighteen without knowing anything of her origins. In the course of the novel, she uncovers the story of her own birth and the strange and romantic histories of other characters, recounted in a series of retrospective narratives and discoveries of packets of letters, until the happy ending which ties up all the strands. As a depiction of Scotland in European fiction before Scott's novels, it offers some interesting points. The history of how a noble family lost power and influence on the downfall of the Stuarts is linked not to Jacobite rebellions but to the execution of Charles I. While there is no explicit discussion of the religious affiliations of the characters, 'miss Narcisse' begins the novel being educated in a convent in the Highlands, and elsewhere a hermit, Pere Antoine, inhabits a grotto. Volume 3 contains an imitation of Ossianic bardic raptures, supposedly produced by one of the characters while in Wales, in homage to his Scottish love, with an authorial note explaining the connection to 'M. Mackferson' [sic]. Some care has been taken by de Castera with regard to the geographical setting, which seems to derive ultimately from the descriptions found in Blaeu's Atlas of 1654. While 'Chateau d'Arabit' seems fictional, it is located in 'Chanrie' (or Chanonry, now Fortrose) and may be based on Ormond Castle, and the other main fictional location, 'Rosenthall' manor, may derive from nearby Rosemarkie. Many of the Scottish placenames are accompanied by authorial notes explaining their location such as 'Innerlothe, otherwise Fort William, capital of Lochaber' (vol. 2, p.154). It would not be impossible to plot Narcisse's journeys on a map of Scotland - and one wonders if this is, in fact, what the author did. Finally, each volume comes with a frontispiece in which characters and buildings and landscapes are presented without any of what would soon become the defining markers of Scottishness such as tartan and baronial castles.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2760
Acquired on14/10/09
AuthorChalmers, Thomas
Title100 years of guttapercha
ImprintR.&J. Dick, Ltd
Date of Publication1946
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis book was published by the firm of R.&J. Dick of Glasgow to celebrate the centenary of the company, and is a fascinating document of Scotland's industrial history. Robert and James Dick were born in Kilmarnock and in the 1840s were apprentices in Glasgow. In 1843 the first samples of guttapercha (latex gum) arrived in Scotland, and in 1846 the brothers saw the possibilities of this product and formed a partnership for the manufacture of cheap rubber shoes. The 'Dick cheap shoe', the book tells us, was a 'byword in the vocabulary of the working classes'. A factory was built at Greenhead, and the firm prospered. The shoe market declined, but guttapercha was discovered to be good insulation for electrical cables, and the firm's product was used in the laying of transatlantic cables. Robert Dick also used Balata, another form of latex, to produce the 'Dickbelt' - industrial-strength belting used around the world. He was a scientific experimenter and friend of Lord Kelvin, while his brother was the financial wizard - James died a millionaire, and left his fortune to charity. The book still has its dustjacket, illustrating the 'Dickbelt' and guttapercha footwear, and still contains the original compliments slip from the firm.
ShelfmarkH1.204.283
Reference SourcesThe book itself
Acquired on06/02/04
AuthorChambers, William and Robert
TitleIntroduction to the science of astronomy. Second edition, embossed by permission; for the use of the Blind.
ImprintGlasgow, printed, in the Asylum at the Institution Press, by John Alston, Honorary Treasurer to the Asylum; and sold by John Smith and Son, Glasgow; Smith Elder and Co., London; John Johnstone Edinburgh, and William Maccomb Belfast:
Date of Publication1843
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an apparently unrecorded edition of this work printed with embossed letters for the blind. The Library has a copy of the 1841 edition (shelfmark RB.s.502); a comparison of the two shows that the 1843 edition has two extra leaves because the type was reset to make it clearer. The text deals with the climate and geography of Earth as well as the solar system. There are six plates, also embossed, with diagrams and charts. The binding is rather curious. The original embossed wrapper can still be seen through the later leather binding, which has 'Science of Astronomy' rather crudely stamped in gold on the front cover. The endpapers are startling, shiny pink paper with gold stars. John Alston (1778-1846) set up his press for raised Roman type in 1836. This copy is inscribed by him as a presentation copy to Thomas Carfrae (1802?-1854). This is a nice addition to the Library's holdings of material printed for the visually impaired, including the Royal Blind School special collection, which contains several other works produced by Alston.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2660
Acquired on28/03/07
AuthorCharles Buick & Sons
TitleSanitary Appliances
Imprint[Edinburgh: W & A.K. Johnston, Ltd]
Date of Publication1907
LanguageEnglish
NotesTrade catalogues often contain fascinating insights into aspects of social and industrial history which would otherwise be hard to recover. This catalogue of 'sanitary appliances' from the firm of Charles Buick and Sons of Alloa documents the range of 'fireclay baths, lavatories, sinks, wash tubs, urinals, closets, hospital appliances, channels and every other description of enamelled goods' the firm manufactured and made available to 'architects, sanitary engineers, plumbers and builders' in 1907, with details of the designs, materials and costs involved. Many of the items illustrated in this catalogue, such as the 'range of 4 independent school closets' and hospital 'slop sinks' would have remained in use throughout the twentieth century. The occasional handwritten notes on this catalogue suggest that it was used by a French speaker.
ShelfmarkHB6.207.4.75
Reference SourcesBookseller's catalogue
Acquired on11/04/07
AuthorChurch of England
TitleBook of common prayer
ImprintEdinburgh: Adrian Watkins
Date of Publication1756
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis volume contains an incomplete 1756 printing of the Book of Common Prayer, as well as a 1764 printing of the "Communion-Office for the use of the Church of Scotland" printed for the Episcopal Church, and a 1757 Edinburgh printing of the Psalms of David. It is has been acquired for its binding done by James Scott of Edinburgh, one of the best bookbinders in 18th century Britain. Six other James Scott bindings of the 1756 Book of Common Prayer are recorded in J.H. Loudon's bibliography "James Scott and William Scott bookbinders", dating from the years 1774-1780. This rather worn and faded binding, in crimson morocco, resembles the earlier bindings from 1774/75 (JS 9, 11, 11.5) and so can probably be dated to c. 1774. A MS genealogy on the verso of the final leaf in the volume and rear pastedown shows that it belonged to Alexander Stewart of Invernahyle, Argyllshire (1707/8-1795), and his family. Stewart was one of the sons of the laird of Invernahyle and during the 1745/46 Jacobite uprising he served in the Jacobite army along with the Stewarts of Appin. He fought at Prestonpans and Culloden; in the former battle he saved the life of a Hanoverian officer, Colonel Whitefoord of Ballochmyle. In his later years he was regular visitor to the house of Sir Walter Scott's father. Scott, as a boy, was thrilled to hear Stewart's tales of the '45 and he visited Stewart in Argyllshire in 1786 or 1787. Scott later claimed that listening to Stewart's tales gave him the inspiration for his most famous historical novel "Waverley", with Stewart acting as a model for the novel's protagonist, Edward Waverley.
ShelfmarkBdg.m.175(1)
Reference SourcesJ.H. Loudon "James Scott and William Scott bookbinders" London, 1980; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on19/07/13
AuthorCicero, Marcus Tullius
TitleM. Tullii Ciceronis opera philosophica ex editione Jo. Aug. Ernesti cum notis et interpretatione in usum Delphini variis lectionibus notis variorum recensu editionum et codicum et indicibus locupletissimis accurate recensita.[vol.II only]
ImprintLondini : Curante et imprimente A. J. Valpy
Date of Publication1830
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is volume two taken from an eighteen volume edition of the collected works of Marcus Tullius Cicero. The book features a grand fore-edge painting of Edinburgh Castle as viewed from the Grassmarket. The painting may have been based upon the title-page vignette of the same scene in T. H. Shepherd's 'Modern Athens Displayed in a Series of Views, or, Edinburgh in the Nineteenth Century' which was published in London in 1829, a year prior to the present volume. However, this painting shows significantly more detail and a wider panorama. The artwork shows only a little fading and a couple of spots of minute wear.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2768
Acquired on03/11/09
AuthorClapperton, Hugh
TitleJournal of a second expedition into the interior of Africa
ImprintPhiladelphia: Carey, Lea & Carey
Date of Publication1829
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the first American edition of the Scottish explorer's posthumously published account of his second African expedition. Clapperton had participated in an earlier expedition with Dixon Denham and Walter Oudney into Central and Western Africa to find the source and map the course of the Niger River. Denham had published an account of that expedition in 1826 in which he had claimed all the glory. In the meantime Clapperton had returned to Africa and on this second trek he was the expedition leader. In this attempt, which was again unsuccessful, he accomplished an immense amount of travel, and here are his travels to Bussa (where he learned the details of Mungo Park's death), Kanto, Katunga, and finally Sokoto, where he died of malaria and dysentery. It was his servant Richard Lander who finally accomplished the expedition's goals on a separate expedition, as detailed in Lander's additions to the basic narrative. The Journal's appendix contains such diverse information as short word lists of the Yoruba and Fellatah languages, meteorological tables, and a list of Clapperton's Arabic manuscripts. The engraved plan shows the course of the Kowara or Quarra River.
ShelfmarkAB.3.208.09
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on26/02/08
AuthorClarendon, Edward Hyde, Earl of
TitleMiscellaneous works of the right honourable Edward Earl of Clarendon
Date of Publication1751
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a superb copy of the second edition of Clarendon's miscellaneous works from the library of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss (1741-1805). Although the book was printed in 1751, it was probably bound some decades later. The binding of tree calf is particularly striking and is in pristine condition with yellow stained edges and blind-tooled turn-in edges. Among booksellers the name Colquhoun has now become a byword for books beautifully bound, in 'mint' condition. The bookplate of the second baronet of Luss, Sir James Colquhoun is on the upper pastedown, with a library shelfmark in ink. He was the sheriff-depute of Dumbartonshire and was one of the principal clerks of session. Little is known of his book collecting activities, though he was a friend and correspondent of Horace Walpole and a connoisseur and collector of paintings, engravings, ancient coins and china. The book was part of the library at Rossdhu until 1984, when it was sold as part of a lot (65 -with Clarendon's History of the rebellion and Civil Wars, 1732) at Christie's and Edmiston's sale. It is a significant addition to the library's collection of now some twenty volumes from this Scottish country house library. Although the book is described as the 'second edition' on the title page, it is in fact the first edition of this work reissued from the original sheets of 1727 (which were also reissued in 1747), then titled A collection of several tracts. This edition is not in itself rare (31 libraries listed on ESTC), but there are no other copies of this edition recorded in Scotland. Edward Hyde, the first Earl of Clarendon (1609-1674) served as an adviser to Charles I and was until 1667 Charles II's chief minister. He is best remembered today for his monumental History of the rebellion (1702-1704), in which he consistently expressed his opposition to any compromise with the Scottish factions.
ShelfmarkBdg.l.44
Reference SourcesChristie's & Edmiston, Glasgow, sale catalogue 22 March 1984: Important books from the library of Sir Ivar Colquhoun of Luss ... removed from Rossdhu. AZA.60d Rossdhu: an illustrated guide to the home of the chiefs of the Clan Colquhoun since 12th century. HP3.92.8
Acquired on09/04/02
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