Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 750 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 361 to 375 of 750:

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AuthorContant D'Orville, Andre-Guillaume
TitleLes fastes de Grande Bretagne, contentant tout ce qui s'est passe d'interessant dans les trois royaumes d'Angleterre, d'Ecosse, & d'Irelande…
ImprintParis: J. P Costard
Date of Publication1769
LanguageFrench
NotesThese two volumes claim to describe 'everything interesting that happened in the three realms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, from the foundation of the monarchy until the peace of 1763. In practice, the work has a decidedly Anglocentric focus - the author explains in his preface that he decided to write about England because of the importance of its relationship with France. However, Scottish history is covered in greater detail after the Union of the Crowns in 1603. In short, this book contains an interesting 18th-century French perspective on events such as the Jacobite risings and 'the most brilliant part of Queen Anne's reign ... the union of Scotland and England'. The author, Andre-Guilliaume Contant d'Orville, (1730-1800), wrote novels and histories, and was influenced by the historical methods of Voltaire. The volumes are in the original stiff paper wrappers, with an 18th-century armorial bookplate (possibly Swedish) inside each front cover.
ShelfmarkAB.1.204.10
Reference SourcesBooksellers' catalogue
Acquired on13/02/04
AuthorCook, Thomas
TitleReminiscences of pleasure trips from Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield and other places in Lancashire, Yorkshire, etc. to Liverpool, Fleetwood, Blackpool, the Isle of Man, Ireland, and Scotland, in the summer of 1847
ImprintLeicester
Date of Publication1847
LanguageEnglish
NotesA rare and fascinating account of two of the earliest of Thomas Cook's organised 'pleasure trips' to Scotland. It is prefaced by Cook's 'short defence of pleasure trips' or 'rational pastimes' as the author described them, which he had first organized from Leicester in 1841. Facilitated by the expanding network of railway lines and inspired by the example of Queen Victoria, Cook launched his tours to Scotland with a somewhat accident-prone excursion in the summer of 1846. Cook also comments somewhat critically on the efforts of other tour organisers and some of their excursionists including a party of Newcastle mechanics who were found 'rolling about the streets [of Edinburgh] in a state of intemperance, co-habiting with the scum of the city'. This produced 'a very unfavourable impression of Englishmen' . This work describes two rather more successful trips in the following year. The first trip lasted a week and brought the excursionists from Fleetwood by steamer to Ardrossan and then by train to Glasgow. The tourists visited Edinburgh, Stirling, Glasgow, Loch Lomond and Paisley. Making use of the recently-constructed high-level rail link from Newcastle to Berwick (and experiencing long delays), the second tour was more extensive, taking in the Highlands, Staffa and Iona as well as the afore-mentioned attractions. The tourists based themselves in Oban 'a pleasant and thriving village of 100 houses', where some of their number were rebuked by the locals for not only for laughing, but also for asking the names of the mountains on the 'Scottish sabbath'. Overall, the visitors came away with a positive impression of Scotland - the climax of the tour being 'the celebrated cave of Fingal'.
ShelfmarkABS.1.201.012
Acquired on14/09/00
AuthorCoultershoggle, Mungo (pseud.)
TitleGoslington Shadow
ImprintNew York: Collins & Hannay et al
Date of Publication1825
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an extraordinary acquisition, a two-volume novel published in America which has most of the dialogue in Scots. The work is extremely rare and the British Library only has a microfilm. This presumably explains why it seems to have escaped critical and literary recognition. The unknown pseudonymous writer also wrote 'Leslie Linkfield' (1826). It seems overwhelmingly likely that he was a Scottish emigrant; the descriptions of the Scottish countryside, and the dialogue, could hardly have been written by someone who had not spent many years in Scotland. The plot is rather reminiscent of Scott's 'Redgauntlet': a naïve youth comes to discover that he is the heir of a powerful aristocratic family, which had fought for the Jacobites. The preposterously-named Goslington Shadow emerges as a hero and lover of noble blood. In terms of literary constuction, this novel is most curious. The narrator adopts a high prose style in flowery English, full of sentimental reflections on landscape, rather like Gothic writers like Mrs. Radcliffe. The tone is frequently knowing and ironic, which can make it an irritating text to read. When the characters speak, however, the language used is serious Scots, and hard to read for a non-native speaker. The plot develops in the most meandering way, introducing numerous picaresque figures whose relevance is rarely immediately clear. I would conjecture that this novel was received in New York in 1825 with utter bafflement. This novel would repay serious study. It seems to me that this is a major attempt at literary innovation, of real significance in the development of Scottish literature. The result is certainly not an unqualified success. Some passages are wonderful and horrible stylistic failures, so bad as to be rather good. Yet the overall wit and intelligence of the writer shine through (see, for example, the debate over the reading of 'Paradise Lost' towards the end of vol. 1). Certainly, compared to some of the examples of 'Scottish literature' currently in print, 'Goslington Shadow' has much to recommend it.
ShelfmarkABS.2.203.005
Acquired on08/04/03
AuthorCraig, Thomas, Sir, 1538-1608.
TitleD. Thomae Cragii de Riccarton, equitis, ... jus feudale, tribus libris comprehensum: ... Editio tertia, prioribus multáo emendatior. ... Accessit rerum & verborum index locupletissimus, ... Opera & studio Jacobi Baillie
ImprintEdinburgi : apud Tho. & Walt. Ruddimannos, 1732.
Date of Publication1732
LanguageLatin
NotesContemporary Scottish binding of red goatskin, the covers tooled in gilt with a border composed of dog-tooth roll and a thistle and floral roll and featuring a centre diamond emblem comprised of roundels and semi-circles. The spine has been rebacked thus preserving the original spine and label. The spine is divided into seven panels with gilt scroll corners, the edges of the boards and turn-ins gilt tooled with thistle and bud roll. The endpapers are floral patterned Dutch gilt. The tooling and patterns on this copy are very similar to that found on two other Scottish bindings in the NLS collections. Bdg.s.877, also published in 1732, and Bdg.l.8, published in 1734, both feature roundels and semi-circles on red leather. The text was first published in London in 1655 and in Leipzig in 1716. It is the first systematic work on law in Scotland.
ShelfmarkBdg.l.45
Reference SourcesESTC T144476
Acquired on04/05/04
AuthorCrouch, Nathaniel
TitleHistory of the kingdoms of Scotland & Ireland.
ImprintLondon
Date of Publication1685
LanguageEnglish
NotesNathaniel Crouch who wrote under the pseudonym of R.B. – Richard or Robert Burton, was a prolific author of books for both adults and children. He is credited with writing, editing or rewriting over 40 books during his long life (c.1632-c.1725). These included emblem books, fables, riddle books, travel narratives and histories. The simplicity of his prose style was praised by Samuel Johnson and he is regarded as one of the first authors to attempt to provide children with entertaining as opposed to purely moralistic reading matter. Crouch had already written about the recent history of the three kingdoms as well as a more exhaustive history of England. In his preface he stated he aimed at 'plainness and brevity' in describing the history of Scotland and Ireland, with particular emphasis on the late medieval period. The book is illustrated with crude woodcuts, some of which are repeated in the text.
ShelfmarkABS.1.201.018
Acquired on19/10/00
AuthorCruikshank, Isaac
TitleResurection [sic] men disturbed, or a guilty conscience needs no accuser.
ImprintLondon: Fores
Date of Publication1794
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a hand-coloured satirical etching by Scottish artist Isaac Cruikshank (1764-1811) depicting a gruesome scene of six men, one with wig and tricorn hat which may indicate that he is a doctor, caught in the act of removing corpses from graves they have just opened up. Before the Anatomy Act of 1832 body snatching, or grave robbing, was often the only means of obtaining human bodies for use in anatomical lessons in the growing number of medical schools. The practice led to relatives of a deceased person mounting a vigil beside the grave to deter the ironically-named "resurrection men".
ShelfmarkRB.l.252
Acquired on09/06/09
AuthorCunningham, James, Captain.
TitleProposals for printing, by subscription, Tartuffe: or, The holy hypocrite detected and exposed.
Imprint[Edinburgh?: s.n.],
Date of Publication[1764?]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a single sheet item in the form of a spoof prospectus which is referred to in a 1764 legal action entitled: 'Memorial for Mr. David Blair, minister of the Gospel and Brechin, defender, against Captain James Cunningham, defender'. David Blair (1701-1769), minister at Brechin, believing that his second wife Ann was having an adulterous affair with Captain Cunningham of Balbougie, Fife, published a story that the child recently born to his wife was not his but was fathered by Cunningham. Blair had married his second wife in 1759, his first wife having died some years previously, and is recorded as having one child with her in 1762, a daughter who lived only for a few months. Cunningham denied the charges, but admitted to publishing several satirical publications on Blair of which this is most probably one. The reference to "Tartuffe" in the title recalls the famous 17th-century French comedy by Moliere, in which the main character is a scheming hypocrite, who ostensibly and exaggeratedly feigns virtue, especially religious virtue.
ShelfmarkAP.5.209.09
Acquired on10/04/09
AuthorCurties, T. J. Horsley
TitleThe Watch Tower; or, sons of Ulthona
ImprintBrentford: Printed by and for P. Norbury
Date of Publication1803
LanguageEnglish
NotesAn extremely rare historical Gothic novel set in 14th-century Scotland during the wars of Robert the Bruce and Edward II. It features the fictional villain Morcar, who commits the horrid crimes of rape, murder and torture in his castle-fortress Stroma, but even worse supports the king of England. Morcar has a crane which provides the only access to the Fortress and which he uses to lower his victims into his clutches. By the end of The Watch-Tower Morcar has tortured Earl Ulthona to death, raped the sweet Imogen, shown a visitor through his hall of torture (which is full of Morcar's mutilated victims), and finally been thrown off one of his battlements by the son of another of his victims. Of Curties's life almost nothing is known, beside the publication of his six deep-dyed Gothic novels over an eight-year period, 1799-1807, including another Scottish-influenced one, "The Scottish Legend, or, the Isle of Saint Clothair". He was a Londoner of some means, an unabashed admirer of Ann Radcliffe, and according to Montague Summers 'there is no author more Gothic, more romantic than he' (The Gothic Quest, p. 333).
ShelfmarkRB.s.2338
Reference SourcesNot in NSTC Garside and Schoewerling "The English Novel 1770-1829) v.2
Acquired on15/07/04
AuthorDalbeattie Golf Club.
TitleThe book of Dalbeattie Golf Club.
ImprintDalbeattie: Printed and published by Ivie A. Callan,
Date of Publication1912
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a rare early 20th-century golf publication on golf in Dumfries and Galloway. The Dalbeattie Golf Club was inaugurated at a public meeting in 1894, and a nine-hole course was created from local farmland. In 1902 a small clubhouse was erected, but proved to be inadequate to meets the needs of the growing membership. The book of Dalbeattie Golf Club, privately printed in 1912, was produced to help raise funds to improve the course and the facilities, with literary contributions from members of the club. As one author writes, "So fascinating has the game of golf now become that a holiday district without a good golf course labours under great disadvantages. A first class golf course is almost a necessity as a means of attracting visitors and, with this object in view it is desirable to have a course worthy of Dalbeattie".
ShelfmarkRB.m.689
Reference SourcesDalbeattie Golf Club website http://www.dalbeattiegc.co.uk/index.html
Acquired on30/04/09
AuthorDalhousie, James Andrew Broun Ramsay, Marquis of
TitleCopy of a minute by the Marquis of Dalhousie, dated February 28, 1856 reviewing his administration in India, from January 1848, to March 1856
ImprintPrinted by J. & H. Cox
Date of Publication1856
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis volume contains a presentation inscription on the title page to the Caledonian United Service Club by Colonel W. Geddes, C.B. It is one of the only examples extant of a review of a Governor-General's period in office from the East-India Company Period. Later reviews appear for succeeding Viceroys although their scope is often limited to the Home Department. This report covers both Foreign and Home Departments. Dalhousie's introduction suggests that this is the first example of such a report on administration, perhaps inspired because of his longer than usual tenure in India. A vast range of subjects are covered: Thuggees, tea, vaccination, female education, natural resources, the port of Singapore, the Burma war and the Sikh war.
ShelfmarkABS.9.202.12
Acquired on23/09/02
AuthorDalrymple, Hew Whitefoord.
TitleProclamation by his excellency Lieutenant General Sir Hugh Dalrymple = Proclamacao de sua excellencia o Tenente General Sir Huch [sic] Dalrymple.
ImprintLisbon : Na impressae regia
Date of Publication[1808]
LanguageEnglish, Portuguese
NotesThis three-page proclamation was drafted by Scottish army officer Sir Hew Whitefoord Dalrymple (1750-1830), at his headquarters in Sintra in Portugal on 18 September 1808. Dalrymple mentions this proclamation on p. 96 in his posthumously published memoir of his conduct in the Peninsular War. As overall commander of the British forces based in Portugal he had, amongst other things, the task of sorting out a new government for the country once the French had been expelled from the country. A French army had invaded Portugal in late 1807 and Dom Joao VI, heir to the Portuguese throne and acting regent, had fled, under British protection, to Brazil. A regency junta had been formed to govern the country in Joao's absence but the French had suspended it, putting its own administration in place. In August 1808 a British expeditionary force had landed in Portugal to drive the French out of the country. Initially commanded by the young, dashing Lt.-Gen. Sir Arthur Wellesley (later to become the Duke of Wellington), the British force had defeated the French decisively at the battle of Vimeiro. Wellesley, however, was unable to pursue his advance against the French as the older, more experienced, Dalrymple arrived in Portugal the day after the battle to assume command. Dalrymple distrusted Wellesley and chose to negotiate an armistice and evacuation of the French by the British navy under the convention of Sintra, much to the dismay of Wellesley and the Portuguese. As well as ensuring that the French would all be safely evacuated, Dalrymple also had to ensure the establishment of new national government. He claims in his memoir that he was at the time "in total ignorance of the intentions of His Majesty's Government as to the sort of Regency that was to be established". After much deliberation Dalrymple decided to restore the 1807 regency junta as far as possible in Lisbon, dismissing the claims to govern of a rival junta which had been established in the city of Oporto and which was led by the bishop of Oporto. He did, however, give the bishop the chance to serve in the reconstituted junta. The text of his proclamation, printed in both English and Portuguese in parallel columns on the page, explains the current situation, assuring the Portuguese of the honour and good faith of the British army. He insists that their presence in the country is only for the "happy means of re-establishing order, and restoring to the Sovereign and the people their just rights". The proclamation also calls upon the leading members of the Portuguese regency junta to repair to Lisbon and to take upon themselves the functions of government; moreover, all inferior jurisdictions and tribunals are required to pay deference and submit to the new government. Dalrymple could later take pride in the fact that his political arrangements in Portugal received official approval from the King. However, his decision to negotiate the convention of Sintra, on terms which seemed highly advantageous to the beaten French, damaged his standing within Portugal and at home. Under Dalrymple's command the British force in Portugal became, after Sintra, "demoralized and faction-ridden" (ODNB). Details of the convention finally reached London on 16 September, causing public outrage; Dalrymple was recalled to Britain to face a government inquiry in November that year, which did exonerate him and all the other British army officers concerned, but Dalrymple was never employed in active service again.
ShelfmarkAP.4.212.01
Reference SourcesH.W. Dalrymple, Memoir written by ... Sir H. Dalrymple ... of his proceedings as connected with the affairs of Spain, and the commencement of the Peninsula War, London, 1830. Stephen Wood, 'Dalrymple, Sir Hew Whitefoord, first baronet (1750-1830)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008
Acquired on03/02/12
AuthorDarwin, Charles.
TitleOn the origin of species by means of natural selection. [2nd edition]
ImprintLondon: John Murray,
Date of Publication1860
LanguageEnglish
NotesDarwin's "Origin of Species" is one of the most important, influential and controversial books to have been published in the English language. With the acquisition of this second edition NLS now has copies all six editions published by John Murray in Darwin's lifetime (1809-1882). The first edition sold out on the day of publication in November 1859, the second edition accordingly appeared in January the following year to meet public demand. Three thousand copies were printed. John Murray had asked Darwin to begin revising the text as soon as the first edition had appeared in print and the second edition can be recognised immediately by the date, by the words 'fifth thousand', and the correct spelling of 'Linnean' on the title page. There is also a minor change to the text with the 'whale-bear story' (where Darwin speculated on a possible evolutionary link between whales and bears, much to the later amusement of his opponents) edited down, and a misprint of the word 'species' has been corrected.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2771
Reference SourcesThe Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online (http://darwin-online.org.uk/)
Acquired on15/12/09
AuthorDarwin, Charles.
TitleJournal of researches into the natural history and geologyof the countries visited during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle.
ImprintLondon: John Murray
Date of Publication1852
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a reissue of the second edition (1845) of Darwin's account of the voyage of the Beagle. It was first published by Henry Colburn in 1839 in two forms - separately and as volume III of Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's ships Adventure and Beagle. According to R.B. Freeman in The works of Charles Darwin this 'book is undoubtedly the most often read and stands second only to On the origin of the species as the most often printed'. It is also an important travel book in its own right. Only two editions were published and Darwin sold the copyright to John Murray for £150. Between the first and second editions the text was extensively revised, the maps omitted and the number of woodcuts increased. The National Library holds volume III of the Narrative and the 1845 editions, but only has the reissue on microfiche. What makes this particular copy remarkable is its provenance. Darwin presented it to William Bernhardt Tegetmeier sometime between 1855, when their long correspondence begun and 1860 when the final definitive text of the Journal appeared. Tegetmeier (1816-1912), was a genuine Victorian polymath and 'character'. He practised as a mesmeric healer, lectured on domestic economy, was a keen bee-keeper and an advocate of cock-fighting. He wrote a number of works on poultry breeding, pheasants and in particular, pigeons. In 1855 Tegetmeier came to the attention of Charles Darwin, who was studying pigeons and other domestic birds as part of the research which led to the Origin of Species (1859) and Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (1868). He took Darwin to pigeon shows, and answered numerous queries in correspondence. The relationship between Darwin and Tegetmeier is also an important one which our current holdings, in both the printed collections and the John Murray Archive, do not appear to have anything to illustrate.
ShelfmarkJMA.1
Reference SourcesFreeman, R.B. The works of Charles Darwin. (Folkestone, 1977) Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Acquired on08/01/07
AuthorDavid Cox, 1783-1859
TitleA Series of Progressive Lessons Intended to Elucidate the Art of Painting in Water Colours: with Introductory Illustrations on Perspective and Drawing with Pencil.
ImprintLondon : Ackermann and Co.
Date of Publication1841
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe 1841 edition is the only one listed in R.V. Tooley's English books with Coloured Plates 1790 to 1860. Cox made important changes to later editions such as this, notably by improvements in the quality of the plates. The volume contains 18 plates of which 10 are coloured, one uncoloured aquatint, 4 lithographs and 3 line engravings. Small blocks of colour samples appear throughout the text and one of the coloured plates features a scene set near Balquhidder. David Cox's standing as an artist was reinforced by the publication of a number of successful manuals, beginning with Ackermann's New Drawing Book in Light and Shadow in 1809. Although not credited to Cox, its range of subjects and depicted locations strongly suggests that he supplied the images. This was followed in 1811 by the first edition of A Series of Progressive Lessons Intended to Elucidate the Art of Painting in Water Colours. The book became one of the most influential of all drawing books and had the unforeseen consequence of training a whole generation of amateurs to imitate Cox's style. Cox's work was praised by Thackeray in Sketches after English Landscape Painters (1850) and Ruskin wrote in 1857 that "there is not any other landscape which comes near these works of David Cox in simplicity or seriousness". Although Cox's standing in the art world reached its apex in the late 19th century, recent reappraisals of Victorian art have seen Cox rightly restored to his position as one of the finest of all British landscape painters. There are only two other extant copies of the 1841 edition at Cambridge University and Yale.
ShelfmarkRB.m.646
Reference SourcesTooley 161
Acquired on15/02/07
AuthorDavid Hume
TitleEsposizione della contestazione insorta fra il Signor Davide Hume e il Signor Gian Jacopo Russo.
Imprint[Venice] : Appresso Luigi Pavini,
Date of Publication1767
LanguageItalian
NotesThe quarrel between the two 18th-century philosophers, David Hume and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, is one of the famous incidents in the history of Enlightenment Europe. In 1763 Hume had gone to Paris as under-secretary to the newly appointed British ambassador, Lord Hertford. He quickly became a celebrity in the French capital, moving in court circles and among the literary salons. In 1765 he offered to find a home in England for Rousseau, as the latter found himself persecuted in France and his native Switzerland for his radical views. The two men met for the first time in December 1765, and Rousseau accompanied Hume on his journey home to England. Initially both philosophers were full of admiration for each other, but once in England the relationship quickly soured, despite Hume's efforts to secure him a royal pension and suitable residence. At their final meeting in March 1766, the notoriously belligerent Rousseau accused Hume of conspiring against him. In June he wrote to Hume, accusing the Scot of bringing him to England to dishonour him. Hume, sensing that Rousseau would try to destroy his reputation in France, fought back angrily in a war of words. He then collected his correspondence with Rousseau, had copies made, and sent one set over to Paris, where in October that year was published, the "Expose succinct de la contestation qui s'est elevee entre M. Hume et M. Rousseau". An English version appeared the following month, and this very rare Italian translation, by an unknown translator, appeared the following year. Baron von Grimm, a German man of letters based in France, famously remarked 'A declaration of war between two great European powers couldn't have made more noise than this quarrel'. Hume was later to regret publication of the work, as public opinion was largely on the side of Rousseau, who returned to France in 1767.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2842
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on29/06/12
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