Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 753 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

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Important Acquisitions 391 to 405 of 753:

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AuthorDe Monvel, Roger Boutet.
TitleLe Bon Anglais.
ImprintParis: Devambez
Date of Publicationc.1918
LanguageFrench
NotesThis is one of three works for children with text by Roger Boutet de Monvel and 'pochoir' (stencilled) illustrations by Guy Arnoux published during the later years of First World War. The other titles were 'Nos Freres d'Amerique' and 'Le Carnet d'un Permissionaire'. They were seemingly designed to create a positive impression of their allies among French children and show soldiers in a variety of peace-time settings. Included are two illustrations of Scots - one depicting the Black Watch, the second 'Le Bon Ecossais', which shows a kilted soldier surrounded by flag-waving children. Arnoux (1886-1951) illustrated some 80 books during his lifetime. He studied with the designer Paul Poiret and was a frequent contributer to the fashion magazine 'Gazette du Bon Ton'. In 1921 he was appointed official artist of the French Navy.
ShelfmarkFB.s.889
Acquired on25/09/06
AuthorStevenson, Robert Louis,
TitleTreasure Island.
ImprintBoston : Roberts
Date of Publication1884
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an attractive copy of the first American edition of Stevenson's classic adventure story. Significantly, it is also the first illustrated edition, published in February 1884 with a print run of 1,000 copies, only two months after the first British edition was published by Cassell & Co. in London. The first illustrated British edition was not published until August 1885. In addition to the famous frontispiece map based on Stevenson's own design, the American edition had four plates drawn by F.T. Merrill. Stevenson, however, himself didn't think much of them, describing them in 1887 as 'disgusting' when contemplating another American edition to be published by Charles Scribner. Consequently, for the 21 plates of the British illustrated edition only 2 of Merrill's illustrations were used. 'Treasure Island' was first published in the weekly magazine 'Young Folks' during 1881 and 1882. Unlike one of his later and less famous novels, 'The Black Arrow' it did not contribute to any rise in the paper's circulation. Stevenson was initially opposed to the illustration of the work, though the success of numerous illustrated editions particularly those published in the early decades of the 20th century, proved how wrong he was.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2631
Reference SourcesSwearingen, Roger G. The prose writings of Robert Louis Stevenson. London, 1980.
Acquired on25/09/06
TitleEdinburgh and Port-Patrick time-bill.
Imprint[Scotland]
Date of Publicationc.1790
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a timetable for the Edinburgh to Portpatrick mail-coach, printed during the 1790s. It sets out the time and the distance for each stage of the journey, along with the name of the contractor responsible for each portion of the journey. The distance covered by the route, which took in places including Moffat, Dumfries, Newton Stewart, Glenluce and Stranraer, was 156 miles. The coach took 23 hours and 20 minutes to cover this distance, allowing for 30 minutes of 'office business' at Stranraer. This was considerably slower than the average royal mail coach, which moved at 11 mph in around 1800, and is indicative of the poor state of Scottish roads at the time.A weekly mail service from Portpatrick to Donaghadee in Co. Down (a distance of 21 miles) was established in 1662. In 1790 a daily mail service was introduced with the Post Office using its own vessels. Previously the mail had been carried by contract in privately owned ships. Portpatrick was also used as a port for sending troops and cattle to and from Ireland. The Portpatrick-Donaghdee route was superceded by the Stranraer-Larne crossing in the 1860s. A regular coach travel for passengers between England and Scotland was only introduced in the 1750s. The journey from London to Edinburgh/Glasgow took 10 or 12 days depending on the season. By the 1780s this had been reduced to 4 days. Within Scotland there were coaches operating between Edinburgh and Glasgow from 1749 and from Edinburgh to Perth and Stirling by 1767. The use of mail coaches, which also catered for passengers, only began in Scotland in 1786 with the London-Edinburgh mail coach which travelled via the Great North Road. Edinburgh-Portpatrick followed in 1790 and Edinburgh-Aberdeen in 1798. However the heyday of the mail coach was short-lived. It was superceded by the railway in most parts of Scotland by the mid-19th century.
ShelfmarkAPS.4.206.013
Reference SourcesCunningham, R.R. Portpatrick through the ages. (1974) Gordon, Anne. To move with the times: the story of transport and travel in Scotland (1988)
Acquired on13/09/06
Author[Smith, Adam]
TitleFragment sur les colonies en general. Et sur celles des anglois en particulier. Traduit de l'anglois.
ImprintLausanne, Société Typographique
Date of Publication1778
LanguageFrench
Notes[SMITH, Adam. REVERDIL, Élie Salomon François, translator]. Fragment sur les colonies en general. Et sur celles des anglois en particulier. Traduit de l'anglois. Lausanne, Société Typographique, 1778. [bound with:] [CLERC, Nicolas-Gabriel]. La Boussole morale et politique des hommes et des empires. Dédiée aux nations. Boston, [n.p.], 1780. [and:] [FRANKLIN, Benjamin; SAUNDERS, Richard; PENN, Richard, HANCOCK, John and PENNSYLVANIA]. La Science du bonhomme Richard. Philadelphia and Lausanne, François Grasset & Co., 1778. An important addition to our holdings of Scottish Enlightenment authors in translation, this is possibly the first appearance of any part of Adam Smith's 'The Wealth of Nations' in French. This extract is a translation of Book IV, chapter vii, 'Of Colonies', of the 1776 first edition of Smith's work. In this section, Smith refutes the idea that wealth consists in amassing precious metals. The 'Fragment' appeared in two issues whose priority cannot be determined (the other issue has a Basle imprint). The translator was Élie Salomon François Reverdil (1732-1808), who in 1760 became tutor to the future Christian VII of Denmark, and, following his pupil's accession to the throne in 1766, one of the king's closest advisors. His politics were reformist. In 1772, he returned to his native Geneva and wrote books, including a French translation of Adam Ferguson, 'Institutions de philosophie morale' (Geneva: 1775), of which NLS has a copy at [Ven].8. Because 'The Wealth of Nations' is a large work whose publication in translation would have been regarded as a risky venture, this fragment may have been published to test demand. The 'Avertissement du traducteur' states that he hopes this extract will encourage someone to translate the entire work. (Carpenter, 'The Dissemination of The Wealth of Nations in French and in France 1776-1843', p. 16+). The first full translation into French also appeared in 1778 as 'Recherches sur la nature et les causes de la richesse des nations': NLS already has a copy at RB.s.1251. (Tribe, 'Critical Bibliography of Adam Smith'), pp. 76, 229). The Fragment, however, is rare, and the only other UK copy seems to be the one in the University of Wales, Bangor. The other works are both relevant to Enlightenment thought. With a Boston and Philadelphia imprint, they are both recorded in the English Short-Title Catalogue (ESTC). Clerc's work considers natural law and the rights of man, with chapters on trade and commerce, arguing for freedom of the seas and of trade, largely critical of English policy. The third item is the first edition of this collection of French translations of American authors, bringing together a number of works on trade and political freedom. All three are good copies, bound in a single volume with contemporary Swiss calf-backed sprinkled boards.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2627(1)
Reference SourcesKeith Tribe, 'Critical Bibliography of Adam Smith' (London, 2002) Kenneth Carpenter, 'The Dissemination of The Wealth of Nations in French and in France 1776-1843' (New York, 2002)
Acquired on31/08/06
TitleHoly Bible
ImprintEdinburgh: Sir D. Hunter Blair and J. Bruce
Date of Publication1807
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis Bible was owned by Jane Baillie Welsh, who was to marry Thomas Carlyle and launch one of the greatest exchanges of correspondence in English. The book is bound for travelling, in red morocco with a fold-over flap to protect it. Inside, the flap is lined with green leather, and it is gilt-stamped 'J. B. Welsh 1814'. It is also signed 'Jane Baillie Welsh' on a flyleaf. In 1814 Jane was just thirteen and being tutored at home, in Haddington, East Lothian. The book clearly stayed with her, as Thomas Carlyle later added his own bookplate to the volume. There are remains of manuscript notes which someone has attempted to erase, but which could be reconstructed. In 1997, the library acquired a copy of Schiller's 'Don Karlos' (Leipzig, 1804), which also has Jane's inscription and Thomas's bookplate. This latest acquisition is particularly interesting as it has this smart binding - which suggests that books were already prized by Jane as a young teenager.
ShelfmarkBdg.s.917
Acquired on28/08/06
TitleThe Holy Bible containing the Old and New Testaments.
ImprintGlasgow: David Bryce and Son
Date of Publication1901
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe publisher David Bryce of Glasgow first published a complete miniature Bible in 1896. This edition is a 1901 reprint with the date no longer on the title page as in the 1896 edition, but on the license leaf on the verso of the title page. The date which in its original form reads in print 'eighteen hundred and ninety' has been altered in ink to '29th day of March nineteen hundred and one' before being handed over to the lithographers. The Bible is bound in light brown calf which has been blind-stamped to imitate a 16th or 17th century centre-diamond binding with clasps. A removable magnifying glass is located in the back cover. The Bible is accompanied by a brass book stand in the form of a bust of an 18th century gentleman, perhaps Samuel Johnson. Bryce published a number of variants of his miniature Bible. This copy is often referred to as the 'Bryce Shakespeare Bible' because the work entitled 'Note on the Shakespeare Family Records' by W. S. Brassington, has has been interpolated between the Old and the New Testaments. Bryce was active around the turn of the 19th century and took an active interest in the latest technological advances in photolithography and electroplates to allow larger volumes to be reduced to the smallest imaginable size. The texts of his works are prized for their clarity and legibility.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2625
Reference SourcesBondy p. 110
Acquired on21/08/06
TitleStevensoniana: being a reprint of various literary and pictorial miscellany associated with Robert Louis Stevenson the man and his work
ImprintNew York: Bankside Press
Date of Publication1900
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis rare item is, indeed, a collection of miscellaneous items by and about Robert Louis Stevenson: it includes texts such as Stevenson's article on Beranger in the Encyclopaedia Britannica and a poem about Stevenson by W.E. Henley, and illustrations including facsimile title pages and reproductions from earlier editions. It is a fine example of American private press de luxe publication of the period, one of a series of such literary productions by the Bankside Press at this time, with M.F. Mansfield accredited as the publisher and Blanche McManus responsible for the illustrations. Originally published in 6 parts (12 are advertised in this volume, but only 6 were produced), the whole, including the original paper covers, has been rebound in contemporary maroon half morocco with black and pink marbled boards and endpapers.
ShelfmarkFB.s.888
Reference SourcesBeinicke Stevenson bibliography vol. 1 item 1425; bookseller's catalogue
Acquired on11/08/06
TitleThe Holy Bible, containing the Old and New Testaments. With arguments to the different books; and moral and theological observations, illustrating each chapter, and shewing the use and improvement to be made of it: composed by the Reverend Mr. Ostervald, Professor of Divinity, and one of the ministers of the Church at Neufchatel in Swisserland: translated at the desire of, and recommended by, the Honble. Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge.
ImprintLondon: Printed by J. Murray, no. 32, Fleet-street.
Date of Publication1777
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a unique and unrecorded Old Testament and Apocrypha printed by John Murray. No bibliographic record can be found for it in ESTC, COPAC, Darlow & Moule and it is also not recorded in the checklist of Murray publications found in Zachs' 'The First John Murray and the Late Eighteenth-Century Book Trade' (Oxford University Press, 1998). It is accompanied by the New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ which has new signatures and a different imprint: Edinburgh: Printed by William Darling, 1776. The New Testament is also not listed in ESTC. Arrayed throughout the entire Bible are 9 engraved maps and 82 full-page engraved plates by Charles Grignion (1721-1810). Grignion was born in London to Huguenot refugees and had a successful career as an historical engraver and book illustrator. He was regarded by many contemporaries as the 'Father and Founder of the English school of Engraving'. The plates are inscribed or presented to various bishops by William Rider (1723-1785). Rider published 'The Christian Family's Bible' in three large folio volumes between 1763 and 1767 and the plates may have initially appeared in those volumes.
ShelfmarkRB.m.634
Reference SourcesNot in ESTC Not in Darlow & Moule
Acquired on07/08/06
TitleDescriptive sketch of the print of the death of Gen. Sir Ralph Abercrombie.
ImprintLondon: John P. Thompson
Date of Publication1804
LanguageEnglish and French
NotesThis broadside is a guide to a print depicting the death of General Sir Ralph Abercromby in Egypt in 1801. The death of Abercromby at the Battle of Alexandria was recorded by a number of painters including James Northcote, Philip de Loutherburg and Samuel James Arnold. It is likely that the print was based on the work of one of these painters. Abercromby was born in Menstrie, Clackmannanshire, in 1734. He was educated in Alloa and Rugby before studying law at the universities of Edinburgh and Leipzig. His military career began in 1758 during the Seven Years War. For a number of years in the 1770s he sat in Parliament as an MP for Clackmannanshire. The French Revolutionary Wars revived Abercromby's military career - he fought in Flanders and the West Indies, then served briefly in Ireland before the rebellion of 1798. In 1800 Abercromby was appointed as commander of the British forces in the Mediterranean. In the process of routing the French at Abu Qir Bay, near Alexandria in March 1801, he was fatally wounded. He was later buried on Malta. Abercromby was a popular figure in the British army and his death elevated him to hero-status among the general public. Curiously, although the imprint gives the date as 1804, the paper has a watermark dated 1809! The publisher was John Peter Thompson, who worked as an engraver, printer and printerseller in Great Newport Street, London from 1792 to 1813.
ShelfmarkRB.l.232
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on31/07/06
TitleThe Holy Bible containing the Old Testament and the new &
ImprintCambridge: Printed by John Archdeacon &
Date of Publication1769
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis two volume set of the Holy Bible, printed in Cambridge in 1769, has been bound in red morocco, probably in imitation of the Edinburgh binder James Scott, who was active during the 1770s and 1780s. Also bound in with the New Testament are the Psalms of David in metre printed in Edinburgh in 1770 by Alexander Kincaid. The Psalms were also printed as part of a Holy Bible published by Kincaid in the same year.This binding is probably contemporary, and given the presence of the Psalms printed in Edinburgh, may have been bound in Scotland. Several of the ornaments used, particularly the scrolls and flourishes (Sc.7.1773 and Sc.13.1774 in Loudon), resemble those used by James Scott, though other prominent ornaments such as the fox and Cupid were not used by Scott. These bindings were part of the collection of Bibles belonging to Lord Wardington (1924-2005).
ShelfmarkBdg.s.916
Reference SourcesJ.H. Loudon, James and William Scott bookbinders. (London, 1980)
Acquired on31/07/06
AuthorSmith, Adam
TitleThe whole works of ... in five volumes ... A new edition.
ImprintLondon: Printed for J. Richardson & Co. [et al.]
Date of Publication1822
LanguageEnglish
NotesA copy of the very rare second collected edition of Smith's works, which includes a new, anonymous biography of Smith. The first collected edition had included a famous biography by Dugald Stewart; this is a much shorter biography which appears to be a crib of the Stewart biography. The format of this second collected edition is also different to the first, which was an octavo. The publishers hoped that the "condensed and accessible form" of the smaller duodecisimo format "will render it more generally acceptable".
ShelfmarkRB.s.2626
Acquired on28/07/06
TitleSailm Dhaibhidh a meadar dhana Gaoidheilg
ImprintDun Edin [Edinburgh]: Aindra Ainderson
Date of Publication1707
LanguageGaelic
NotesThis is a fine copy of the very rare fifth edition of the Psalms in Gaelic. Only one other copy in recorded in public collections and Donald Maclean in 'Typographia Scoto-Gadelica' described this edition as 'excessively rare'. The Psalms were first translated into Gaelic by the Synod of Argyle in 1659. Also printed as part of the book was an edition of the Westminster Shorter Catechism 'Foirceadul aithghear cheasnuighe'. This book formed part of the library of the Earls of Macclesfield at Shirburn Castle, Oxfordshire. The first Earl of Macclesfield, Thomas Parker (1666-1732) was deeply interested in theological works and it is likely that he purchased this item in the early 18th century. The Macclesfield bookplate is on the front pastedown with a library label dating from 1860 on the front free endpaper.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2619
Reference SourcesScottish Gaelic Union Catalogue (Edinburgh, 1984) Maclean, Donald. Typographia Scoto-Gadelica (Edinburgh, 1915)
Acquired on26/06/06
TitleThe Holy Bible, containing the Old and New Testaments: newly translated out of the original tongues; and with the former translations diligently compared and revised.
Imprint Edinburgh: Printed by Alexander Kincaid
Date of PublicationMDCCLXXIII [1773]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a two-volume contemporary Scottish binding in green morocco. Both volumes feature a centre floral emblem surrounded by gilt leaves, swirls and corner floral emblems. The edges of the boards are gilt-tooled. The spine is divided into five panels with one panel incorporating a gilt volume number, and the others with identical gilt floral emblems. The edges of the text-blocks are stained yellow and the endpapers are floral patterned Dutch gilt. Both volumes are accompanied by contemporary custom sewn leather pouches.
ShelfmarkBdg.s.914
Acquired on22/06/06
AuthorVetch, James
Title[Manuscripts and printed works on the Suez Canal project collected by the Scottish Suez canal pioneer, James Vetch]
Date of Publication1842-55
LanguageEnglish
NotesJames Vetch (1789-1869), was born at Haddington, East Lothian. He had a notable career, serving in the Royal Engineers, and then working for the Ordnance Survey, including a period surveying the Scottish islands. He also worked on the development of mining in Mexico and on the English railways, before turning his attention to the question of a canal between the Mediterranean and Red seas. "In 1843 Vetch published an Enquiry into the means of establishing a ship navigation between the Mediterranean and Red seas, after having worked on the problem since 1839. The work ran through several editions and attracted much public attention, but the government, and especially Palmerston, opposed the plan as contrary to the political interests of the country. Twelve years later Ferdinand de Lesseps, a former French diplomat who is usually credited with being the inspiration behind the Suez Canal, which opened in 1869, published his scheme, printing Vetch's opinions as an appendix to his work" (Oxford DNB). Vetch spent much of the rest of his career working on sewers and drains. The collection contains the autograph manuscript of his pioneering article, together with a collection of the early reports and pamphlets on the scheme, collected and partly annotated by Vetch. The manuscript of the Enquiry (or Report, as it was first called) contains several emendations and deletions, and can be compared directly with the first printed edition of the work, which is present here. Also loosely inserted into the second volume is the orginal "Form of requiring entry of proprietorship" (for copyright purposes) made out by Vetch himself. There is also a marked-up proof copy of Vetch's entry in the old DNB. The bound collection appears to have been brought together roughly contemporaneously with publication of Lesseps's Isthmus of Suez, the latest dated work here. All these items are collected into two volumes bound in nineteenth-century blue half calf. Contents: I. a. VETCH, James. Report on the means of establishing a ship navigation between the Mediterranean & Red seas. [London] "1 Clifford's Inn, 20th January 1842." Manuscript, pp. 39, preceded by an engraved map. b. MACLAREN, Charles. "Account of the ancient canal from the Nile to the Red Sea" [excerpted from the Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, October, 1825.] pp. [274]-291. NOT IN NLS c. Manuscript notes: 1p. being estimates of the population of Israel at the time of the crossing of the Red Sea, from Biblical sources d. [Report from the Select Committee on Steam Navigation to India, with the minutes of evidence, 1836.] pp. 342-392. e. Manuscript notes: 2 pp. on the geography of Egypt. II. a. VETCH, James. Inquiry into the means of establishing a ship navigation between the Mediterranean & Red seas. London: Pelham Richardson, 1843. pp. 34, folding lithographed map, routes added in contemporary hand colouring. NOT IN NLS b. ANDERSON, Arthur. Communications with India, China, &c. Observations on the practicability and utility of opening a communication between the Red Sea and the Mediterranean. London: Smith, Elder, and Co., 1843. pp. 48. c. CLARKSON, Edward. The Suez navigable canal, for an accelerated communication with India. second edition. London: T. Hookham and others for the British and Foreign Agency Office, 1843. pp. 16 + 8 (British and Foreign Institute Prosepectus). NOT IN NLS d. GALLOWAY, John Alexander. Communication with India, China, &c. Observations on the proposed improvements in the overland route via Egypt. London: John Weale, 1844. pp. 24, large folding lithographed map. e. [WALKER, William.] A plan for improving the transit of passengers and goods across the isthmus of Suez [drop-head title]. [May 1847]. pp. 15, [I], [2] (Appendix). NOT IN NLS f. LESSEPS, Ferdinand Marie de. The Isthmus of Suez question. London: Longman, 1855. pp. 223, [I} (blank), 3 folding engraved mnps, one printed in colour.
ShelfmarkAcc.12648
Acquired on20/06/06
AuthorSir David Young Cameron (1865-1945)
TitleEtchings in North Italy
ImprintGlasgow : William B. Paterson
Date of Publication1895-96
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe National Library of Scotland has acquired a complete set of David Young Cameron's 'Etchings in North Italy'. Published in Glasgow by William B. Paterson between 1895 and 1896, it consists of a signed engraved title page and 26 signed etchings. Originally issued in a portfolio, this set has been presented in modern mounts and placed within a specially made solander case backed in green morocco. The North Italian etchings are a highlight of Cameron's early career and include some of his greatest prints. Only about 25 sets were published and complete sets are now extremely rare. Sir D Y Cameron (1865-1945) was born in Glasgow and studied at the Glasgow School of Art between 1881 and 1884, and later at the Trustees' Academy in Edinburgh where he remained until 1887. In 1886 he exhibited for the first time at the Royal Scottish Academy and the Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts. Cameron began etching at 18 and became known for etched views of architecture and drypoints of mountain and moorland scenery. He would eventually produce around 520 etchings and drypoints of which at least 300 were done before 1900. In a career that spanned forty-five years, he would become with fellow Scots Muirhead Bone and James McBey one of the foremost British etchers of the etching revival of 1880-1930. On the strength of his print 'A Perthshire Village' (1888) he was elected an associate of the Society of Painter-Etchers in 1889 at the age of twenty-three, becoming a fellow six years later. Cameron's great skill was in the depiction of architectural subjects, conveying not only the beauty of a building but also something of its history and 'soul'. Blessed with superb draughtsmanship and technique, he was a master of detail, mood, shadows and light. Although he was a fine oil and watercolour painter, it is felt that his artistic gifts and abilities are best presented in his etchings. Following are the contents of the set, together with the corresponding reference numbers from Frank Rinder's 'Illustrated catalogue of Cameron's etchings and dry-points, 1887-1932': (202) North Italian Set, portfolio label; (203) North Italian Set; title page; (204) St. Mark's, Venice, no. 1; (205) Veronica; (206) The Monastery; (207) A Venetian Convent; (208) Paolo Salviati; (209) Tintoret's House; (210) A Venetian Fountain; (211) Via ai Prati Genoa; (212) The Confessional; (213) San Giorgio Maggiore; (214) Two Bridges; (215) The Butterfly; (216) A Soldier of Italy; (217) A Lady of Genoa; (218) Two Monks; (219) Church Interior, Venice; (220) Venice from the Lido; (221) Sketch of Venice; (222) Farm Gateway, Campagnetta; (223) The Bridge of Sighs, Venice; (224) The Ponte Vecchio, Florence; (225) The Palace Doorway (Palazzo Dario, Venice); (226) Porta del Molo, Genoa; (227) The Wine Farm; (228) Pastoral; (229) Landscape with Trees
ShelfmarkRB.l.230
Reference SourcesThe etchings of DY Cameron by Arthur M Hind (London, 1924); D.Y. Cameron: an illustrated catalogue of his etchings and dry-points, 1887-1932 by Frank Rinder (Glasgow: 1932)
Acquired on15/06/06
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