Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 735 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

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Important Acquisitions 496 to 510 of 735:

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AuthorBeattie, James
TitleNeue philosophische Versuche. Aus dem Englischen uebersezt. Mit einer Vorrede vonm Herrn Professor Meiners.
ImprintLeipzig: in der Weygandschen Buchhandlung
Date of Publication1779-1780
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is the first edition of the German translation of Beattie's "Essay on the nature and immutability of truth, in opposition to sophistry and scepticism; on poetry and music, as they affect the mind; on laughter, and ludicrous composition; and on the utility of classical learning". James Beattie (1735-1803) was a poet, essayist and moral philosopher. Born in Kincardine and educated at Aberdeen, he became professor of moral philosophy and logic at Marischall College, Aberdeen, in 1760. The essays assembled in this collection were written over the course of 17 years: on poetry and music in 1762, on laughter in 1764, and on classical learning in 1769. The essay on truth itself does not appear in a German translation here, only Beattie's preface to the new edition of 1776, undated additions and amendments, and an epilogue dated 1770. In his own preface to the translations, Professor Meiners refers to Beattie as the most thorough contestant of Hume's philosophy and the most fortunate defender of truth and virtue. However, he is much less complimentary about Beattie's essay on laughter and criticises Beattie for not properly distinguishing between the terms ludicrous and ridiculous.
ShelfmarkABS.1.204.029
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on11/02/04
AuthorMacdonald, George
TitleCome and play with me
ImprintLondon: Alexadnra Publishing Company
Date of Publicationc.1860-1900
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis children's annual contains an unacknowledged abridged and simplified version of George Macdonald's classic children's fantasy story The Princess and the Goblin. Macdonald's story was first published in 1872, and the version here reprints Arthur Hughes' original illustrations. The annual is undated. It contains references to the Arica earthquake of 1868 and the Franco-Prussian war of 1871-2 as recent events, so was presumably first printed around this time, although the advertisements suggest this may be a later reprint. That an abridged, and presumably unauthorized version of Macdonald's novel appeared so soon after its first publication is a testimony to its contemporary appeal, and shows the wide audience for his works. The annual has a cheerful cover in coloured boards, but the inviting illustration of a girl saying 'Come and play with me' is rather undermined by the stark advertisements on the inside boards: 'DO NOT UNTIMELY DIE!' but take 'Fennings' Fever Curer' instead.
ShelfmarkAB.3.204.004
Reference SourcesBookseller's catalogue
Acquired on07/02/04
AuthorChalmers, Thomas
Title100 years of guttapercha
ImprintR.&J. Dick, Ltd
Date of Publication1946
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis book was published by the firm of R.&J. Dick of Glasgow to celebrate the centenary of the company, and is a fascinating document of Scotland's industrial history. Robert and James Dick were born in Kilmarnock and in the 1840s were apprentices in Glasgow. In 1843 the first samples of guttapercha (latex gum) arrived in Scotland, and in 1846 the brothers saw the possibilities of this product and formed a partnership for the manufacture of cheap rubber shoes. The 'Dick cheap shoe', the book tells us, was a 'byword in the vocabulary of the working classes'. A factory was built at Greenhead, and the firm prospered. The shoe market declined, but guttapercha was discovered to be good insulation for electrical cables, and the firm's product was used in the laying of transatlantic cables. Robert Dick also used Balata, another form of latex, to produce the 'Dickbelt' - industrial-strength belting used around the world. He was a scientific experimenter and friend of Lord Kelvin, while his brother was the financial wizard - James died a millionaire, and left his fortune to charity. The book still has its dustjacket, illustrating the 'Dickbelt' and guttapercha footwear, and still contains the original compliments slip from the firm.
ShelfmarkH1.204.283
Reference SourcesThe book itself
Acquired on06/02/04
AuthorAnderson, William
TitleLandscape Lyrics
Imprint[London]
Date of Publication1838
LanguageEnglish
NotesWilliam Anderson (1805-1866) was born at Edinburgh. His maternal grandfather was the author of the 'Natural History of the Mineral Kingdom' and his brother John was the historian of the house of Hamilton. Apart from newspaper contributions, his first publication was 'Poetical Sketches' in 1833. By 1838 he was living in London where he moved in literary circles. Later he returned to Scotland, continuing to publish and working for Scottish newspapers. The DNB characterizes Anderson's poetry as 'generally sweet and tuneful' but 'not characterized by much merit of a literary kind'. These 'Landscape Lyrics' are typical mid-19th century verse in their style and subject. This copy, however, is of particular interest, being the author's proof copy of the first edition, without title page or plates. As the bookseller's catalogue says, 'These pleasantly messy proofs were evidently corrected currente calamo as they came off the press'. As such, they are a good example of writing and publishing practices of the period, and complement the Library's holdings of publisher's archives in this regard. A copy of the publication in its final state is at AB.8.83.5, which would make an interesting comparison.
ShelfmarkAPS.4.204.47
Reference SourcesDNB; Bookseller's catalogue.
Acquired on26/01/04
AuthorSt Peters Church, Edinburgh.
TitleReport by the Committee of Management of St. Peter's Episcopal Church new building: with first list of subscribers.
Imprint[Edinburgh]
Date of Publication[1859]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a report on the building of and fund-raising for a new Church in the southside of Edinburgh, by the building committee for the congregation of St. Peter's Roxburgh Place. This congregation had begun in 1791 as an 'overflow' from Old St. Paul's in Carrubber's Close. It continued in Roxburgh Place until the 1850s when it was decided to move further south to Lutton Place. The new building was of a neo-gothic style and designed by William Slater of London. The church was opened for worship on Whitsunday 1860, though the debt was not cleared until 1889. The report is accompanied by two fine lithographs by Friedrich Schenck of George St. Edinburgh. Neither lithograph is recorded in the entry for Schenck in the Directory of lithographic printers of Scotland 1820-1870. No copy of this work with plates has been traced in any library (BL, CURL, OCLC, RLIN). The library already has a copy of this work at Dowd.465(15) which differs from this copy in a number of respects: 1. Dowd is a proof copy; this copy is a corrected proof 2. Dowd lacks the plates 3. The five lists of subscribers in Dowd are dated 25 June; the six in this copy are dated 15 July.
ShelfmarkABS.2.204.029
Reference Sourceshttp://www.stpetersedinburgh.org/history.htm
Acquired on22/01/04
AuthorThomas Taylor
TitleIllustrated price list of bowling green bowls and bowling requisites
Date of Publication1955
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an attractive trade catalogue from a Glasgow manufacturer of lawn bowling equipment. The company, established in 1796, was the first to offer standard bias on bowls by creating the world's first bowl shaping machine. In the same year that the shaping machine was invented and patented - 1871 - Thomas Taylor Bowls also constructed the first bowls testing table, using a slate base similar to a billiards table and covering it in felt and canvas. The bowls were made of lignum-vitae, a special wood obtainable only from the West Indies. In 1928 the newly formed International Bowling Board adopted the Scottish Bowling Association's rules of the game and the Thomas Taylor standard bowl as the minimum bias bowl for all international matches. As well as bowls the company also manufactured bowl measures and bowl cases. The Library also holds trade catalogues from this company dating from 1937 and 1962.
ShelfmarkHP1.204.6585
Reference Sourceshttp://www.theglasgowstory.com/image.php?inum=TGSA00717
Acquired on04/01/04
TitleDe' costumi e della morte di Maria Clementina Regina d'Inghilterra, di Francia, e d'Irlanda
ImprintIn Roma ed in Bologna
Date of Publication1737
LanguageItalian
NotesThis is a biography of Princess Clementina, the wife of the Old Pretender. She was the granddaughter of John Sobieski, the warrior king of Poland. Her marriage took place in 1719, under the protection of Pope Clement XI, who proclaimed the pair King and Queen of England. The alliance had been vehemently opposed by the Holy Roman Emperor, who had imprisoned the young woman. She was later dramatically rescued by a band of Jacobite adventurers led by Charles Wogan. The marriage proved turbulent, and unhappy with the princess leaving her husband for a time. A reconciliation was eventually arranged, although she did not long survive it as she died in 1731. This is a very good copy of a rare edition complete with portrait, and a final leaf containing an engraved coat of arms.
ShelfmarkAB.1.204.05
Reference SourcesBooksellers catalogue
Acquired on03/01/04
AuthorGray, Andrew
TitleSpiritual warfare; or some sermons concerning the nature of mortification, together with the right spiritual exercise and spiritual advantages thereof
ImprintBoston: ub N.E. Re-printed by S. Kneeland, for Benj. Eliot, at his shop in King-Street.
Date of Publication1720
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the first and only American edition of Gray's work, which was first published in Edinburgh in 1670. Gray was a Scottish divine who became extraordinarily popular as a preacher before his sudden death in 1656, at the astonishing age of 22. His writings were all published posthumously. The present collection of sermons, with a short preface by Thomas Manton, was frequently reprinted throughout the 18th century. This Boston edition is uncommon with the ESTC listing only seven extant copies. The work is in a well-preserved Boston binding of the period.
ShelfmarkAB.1.204.07
Reference SourcesBooksellers catalogue
Acquired on03/01/04
AuthorSmith, Richard
TitleBrief treatyse settynge forth divers truethes necessary both to be beleved of chrysten people, & kepte also
ImprintLondon: Thomas Petit
Date of Publication1547
LanguageEnglish
NotesESTC S1134 The acquisition of this item demonstrates how the different aspects of our work can join up serendipitously. Cataloguing the Fort Augustus collections led to a decision to feature Archbishop Hamilton's Catechism of 1552 on our webpages as a Highlight of the collections, and the research for that text meant that we spotted the connection with this Richard Smith item when it was not flagged at all by the vendor. Richard Smith (1500-1563) was a theologian and divine who, disregarding a couple of tactical recantations, took a staunchly Catholic side during the Reformation. He was the first Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford, and one of the team involved in the production of Henry VIII's Institution of a Christian Man in 1537. When the Protestant party triumphed in England, he twice fled first to Scotland and then to France. While his movements on the accession of Elizabeth I seem fairly clear, there is some confusion over where exactly he was and when, between his first flight from England in 1549 and his return in 1553. He certainly went to St Andrews in Scotland and thence to Louvain. John Durkan in McRoberts' collection "Essays on the Scottish Reformation" assigns the writing of the Hamilton catechism to another Englishman, Richard Marshall, but notes that Smith was distributing copies to clergy in November, and was present at the Synod which commissioned the catechism. In his edition of Hamilton's catechism in 1882, Professor Mitchell says that Smith was one of the theology faculty at St Andrews when the catechism was drawn up, and his involvement may have led to the echoes of the Institution of a Christian Man (in some cases, direct renderings into Scots) in the catechism. It does seem likely that the production of such a text would have involved the available experts, rather than being the work of one sole individual. Given all these factors, we can see that this Brief Treatyse is an equally significant source for the catechism to the Institution of a Christian Man. It is Smith's third original work, and its title, like that of the Institution ('A necessary doctrine and erudicion for any chrysten man') emphasizes what the ordinary lay Christian should know - exactly what the catechism offers. Certainly the layout of this book is similar to that of the catechism: it is to be hoped that a researcher will take on the task of comparing the contents. This library is the best in the world for the study of the 1552 catechism (we hold most of the surviving copies), and here we have an opportunity to enrich the understanding of it through the purchase of a little-known item which is at least a valuable context and probably a direct source. There is no other copy in Scotland according to the ESTC. While the Brief Treatyse is available on microfilm and also via EEBO, original copies are very rare. This copy has been described as 'not great, but better than a "working" copy'. There are a few minor imperfections, but the main problem is the title page, which is 'cut-round and crudely inlaid' without loss of text, and also 'soiled, somewhat browned and stained'. Finally, this item has a Scottish provenance: it contains the undated bookplate of Alexander Moffat of Edinburgh, who is unlisted in our bookplates index. At least one contemporary owner has left marginalia and other markings in the text; later owners include Wm Herbert, 1760 and the Duke of Sussex, whose armorial bookplate is on the front pastedown. Finally there is the bookplate of the Bristol collector James Stevens Cox (1910-1997). This book is one of three the NLS has purchased from the sale of his library, a collection considered worthy of its own location in the Short Title Catalogue of English books before 1640.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2321
Reference SourcesDNB, catalogue, David McRoberts: Essays on the Scottish Reformation; 1882 and 1884 editions of Archibishop Hamilton's Catechism
Acquired on18/12/03
AuthorFleming, Robert
TitleConfirming worke of religion, in its necessity and use briefly held forth; that each Christian may have a proper ballast of his own, of the grounds and reasons of his faith, and thus see the greatness of that security; on which he adventures his eternal fate.
ImprintRotterdam: Printed by Reinier Leers.
Date of Publication1685
LanguageEnglish
NotesESTC R40606 A rare work by a popular ejected Scottish minister published in the place of his exile. Robert Fleming the elder (his son followed him as a writer and minister) was born in 1630 at Yester, Haddingtonshire, studied at Edinburgh and St Andrews, and may have fought in the Scottish army during the Civil War. He was called to the ministry in 1653, and deprived of his parish of Cambuslang, Lanarkshire, on the restoration of episcopacy in 1662. He preached in Scotland and London, in spite of problems with the authorities and other difficulties, until 1677, when he was called to a collegiate charge in the Scots Church at Rotterdam, a city where many religious exiles took refuge in the 17th century. On a visit to Edinburgh in 1679 he returned to Edinburgh, where he was imprisoned for holding conventicles, but escaped and returned to Rotterdam. His troubles with the Scottish authorities ended with the political changes of 1689, but he remained in Holland and died on a visit to London in 1694. The DNB lists eleven works by Fleming, in addition to sermons: he defended his own kind of protestantism against Quakers and Catholics alike, and related the lives of Scottish and Ulster Protestants to his own faith and what he saw as the workings of divine providence. This book, in that vein, attempts to show 'the true and infallible way, for attaining a confirmed state in Religion', as the title page says, relating spiritual doctrines and experiences to contemporary events - 'a short confirming prospect of the work of the Lord about his Church, in these last times.' The NLS already holds other editions of this work, but according to the ESTC there is no other copy of this edition in Scotland, and only seven others are recorded altogether. This copy comes to us with three interesting provenances. On the verso of the title page is an inscription signed 'H.D.A.': Omne tulit punctum/ Qui miscuit Utile dulci ['he has gained every point who has mixed the useful and the agreeable', from Horace's Ars Poetica]. I got this token of kindness from Mr. R.F. the author, my very worthy friend'. The book also has the bookplate of Patrick Hume, 1st Earl of Marchmont, Lord High Chancellor of Scotland, dated 1702. The gilt crowned orange from the arms of the Earl of Marchmont can still be seen on the spine panels, though faded. Finally there is the bookplate of the Bristol collector James Stevens Cox (1910-1997). This book is one of three the NLS has purchased from the sale of his library, a collection considered worthy of its own location in the Short Title Catalogue of English books before 1640.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2319
Reference SourcesDNB; sale catalogue
Acquired on17/12/03
AuthorMonipennie, John
TitleAbridgement or summarie of the Scots chronicles
ImprintEdinburgh: Printed by the Heires of George Anderson, for the Company of Stationers
Date of Publication1650
LanguageEnglish
NotesMonipennie: Abridgement or Summarie of the Scots Chronicles ESTC R223767; Aldis 1394 The only recorded holding of this Aldis item in Scotland. John Monipennie's abridgement of the Scots Chronicles was first published in 1612, and went through several editions. This edition is described on the title page as 'Newely inlarged corrected and amended', although the text does not indicate what the enlargments, corrections and amendments are. The actual Abridgement ends with Charles I: 'The Lord increase all royall vertues in his Highnesse, that he may remain a comfort to Christs Church within his own dominions' (p.174), a prayer that sits rather problematically with the 1650 publication date. Monipennie does not record what he is abridging, other than quoting lines from Boethius and Holinshed on the verso of the title page, but as well as his potted guide to Scottish history, this volume includes a list of the Kings and Queens of Scotland, a 'true description and division of the whole realme', and a 'memoriall of the most rare and wonderfull things in Scotland' (title page). Besides describing rare animals and holy wells, these few pages tell the reader that Loch Ness never freezes, 'signifying unto us, that there is a Mine of Brimstone under it, and that 'in the North seas of Scotland are great Clogs of Timber found, in the which are marveilously ingendered a sort of Geese, called Clayk Geese' (pp.285, 287). Later owners have left their mark: C.A. Martin, December 1842 and Vernon Holt, 1880. Finally there is the bookplate of the Bristol collector James Stevens-Cox (1910-1997). This book is one of three the NLS has purchased from the sale of his library, a collection considered worthy of its own location in the Short Title Catalogue of English books before 1640. As was a common practice of his, Stevens-Cox has left a brief pencil bibliographical note (on the verso of the front free endpaper).
ShelfmarkRB.s.2320
Reference SourcesESTC, sales catalogue
Acquired on17/12/03
AuthorCameron, William
TitlePoems on various subjects
ImprintEdinburgh: Gordon and Murray
Date of Publication1780
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe Library bid successfully for this lot at the auction of part of the library of the late Lord Perth. The lot comprised two books: a fine copy of William Cameron's Poems bound by James Scott of Edinburgh, and a fine copy of the Foulis Press Terence printed in 1742 in a 'Chippendale' binding. William Cameron of Kirknewton (now in West Lothian) is the anonymous writer of these poems. The Library has another copy also bound by Scott showing the same gilt twist-roll border and ornamented spine, but that copy is very worn. Our new copy is crisp and attractive, with Scott's label affixed to the title-page. It is the same copy that was photographed for J. H. Loudon's book on James and William Scott, which helped to bring their innovative bindings to widespread attention. The second item is Terence, Comoediae, Glasgow, printed by Robert Urie for Robert Foulis, 1742. This is a most attractive red morocco binding with a gilt-tooled design in the 'Chippendale' style, with flowers and birds around the scrolls of foliage. The textblock, printed by the important Foulis Press, is not on large paper but is uncut. Both books are important additions to our collection of Scottish bindings, and their provenance makes them particularly pleasing; Lord Perth was a good friend of the Library and a remarkable Scottish collector.
ShelfmarkBdg.s.895
Reference SourcesLoudon, p.190-1 Gaskell 13
Acquired on28/11/03
Author[Miscellaneous]
Title[Collection of Scottish tracts]
Imprint[Various]
Date of Publication1691-1774
LanguageEnglish
NotesThese five volumes, bought at auction as one lot, contain 24 items. The National Library of Scotland has the world's strongest holdings of early Scottish tracts and pamphlets, and there are some particularly important additions here, with a number of very rare or unrecorded works. Some examples of works new to our collections are given here: 'A letter from a gentleman in Edinburgh to his friend in the country', Glasgow, 1752. Only one copy listed in ESTC (Princeton University) Andrew Welwood, 'A Glimpse of Glory', Edinburgh, 1774. Unrecorded. 'The Black Book of Conscience', 30th edition, Edinburgh, 1751. Only one imperfect copy in ESTC (Huntington Library) 'A description of all the kings of Scotland', 1713. Unrecorded. 'A non-juror's recantation', London, 1691. Unrecorded. 'Issuasive from Jacobitism', London, 1713. Unrecorded. It is always particularly useful to acquire unrecorded works bound in volumes with other items, as this helps to indicate the context in which they appeared, and so makes it easier for the unknown work to be interpreted. This is a particularly good group of pamphlets on Scottish religion and politics.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2313-17
Acquired on28/11/03
AuthorBeddoe, John
Title[Collection of 42 pamphlets etc]
Imprint[Various]
Date of Publicationc. 1859-1900
LanguageEnglish
NotesJohn Beddoe (1826-1911) was born in Worcestershire but studied medicine at Edinburgh University, becoming house physician at Edinburgh Royal Infimary. He developed a keen, not to say obsessive, interest in the different ethnic or racial groups of Europe. His studies of hair and eye colour, height and physique, are among the early works of the science of anthropology. More disturbingly, his ethnological writings prepare the way for the theories of racial separation and extreme nationalism that disfigured the early twentieth century. This is a collection of some 43 pamphlets and offprints in two volumes, many inscribed by the author, perhaps to a family member or close friend. Among these are some rare provincial Scottish and English imprints, such as 'Anthropological history of Europe', Paisley, 1893. Beddoe spent much of his life in the English west country, and there are some interesting examples of Bristol printing. Many of the works have a distinct Scottish slant. Notably, his publication 'On the stature and bulk of man' has tables with details of Scottish villagers, measured with and without shoes, and weighed with and without clothes. Amusingly, Beddoe spends some time complaining that people would not always cooperate with his researches. In Scotland, the east coast fishermen proved 'extremely stubborn and suspicious', and a Glasgow manufacturer told him it was a 'waste of workmen's time'. These pamphlets fit in well with existing collections such as the Combe collection of phrenological writings. Although much of Beddoe's data is of great interest, one feels unhappy at the direction of his arguments. 'On the physical characteristics of the Jewish race' (1869) is not actually coloured by any anti-Semitic remarks, but how much did it contribute to the rise of racist pseudo-science sixty years later? This is, perhaps, the darker side of Edinburgh's contribution to science and medicine.
ShelfmarkAB.2.206.010(1-43)
Acquired on21/11/03
AuthorDunbar, William
TitleDance of the Sevin Deidly Synnis
ImprintMarket Drayton: Tern Press
Date of Publication2003
LanguageOlder Scots
NotesThis is no. 3 of a limited edition of 25 copies of William Dunbar's "Dance of the Sevin Deidly Synnis". The book was produced by Nicholas and Mary Parry at the Tern Press, and is signed by both at the colophon. It is illustrated with ten black and white lithographs by Nicholas Parry. The design, printing, illustration and binding was done by the Parrys. William Dunbar (ca. 1460-1513?) was probably from East Lothian. He graduated from the University of St Andrews with a master of arts in 1479. Between 1500 and 1513 he received a pension from King James IV as a member of the royal household in the service of James IV. Dunbar was employed both as a royal clerk or secretary and as the King's laureate. The Scottish court provided Dunbar not only with his livelihood, but also with the primary audience for his poetry. Dunbar, who wrote in the tradition of Chaucer in Middle Scots, has been decsribed as the greatest of the "makaris", to use his own vernacular equivalent for poets. One of his best known poems is "The Thrissill and the rose", which celebrates the wedding of James IV to Margaret Tudor in 1503. He is also famous for the "Flyting between Dunbar and Kennedy", a comparative trial of wits, and "The Goldyn Targe", to name but two of his works. "The Dance of the Sevin Deidly Synnis" is Dunbar's greatest humorous satire. The sins, ranging from pride to gluttony, are depicted in all their repulsive deformity: it is a work of gloomy power. Chepman and Myllar issued an edition of seven of Dunbar's poems in 1508; the first complete collection of his poetry was published in two volumes by the bibliophile David Laing in 1834.
ShelfmarkFB.l.342
Reference SourcesDNB, Reid, A. and Osborne, B.D.: Discovering Scottish Writers (Edinburgh 1997), Catholic Encyclopedia
Acquired on04/11/03
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