Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 727 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 61 to 75 of 727:

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AuthorEdmond Hoyle
TitleHoyle's game of whist.
ImprintDundee: Printed for Ostell, London [et al.]
Date of Publication1806
LanguageEnglish
NotesEdmond Hoyle (1679-1769) was the first English writer on the rules and strategy of popular games. He is best known for his works on card games, but he also published works on subjects such as backgammon and chess, as well as a book about probability. In 1742 his "A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist" came out, a book which became the definitive book on whist until the second half of the 19th century. Hoyle's work was reprinted several times in the 18th century, and was often pirated. This miniature version (78 mm high) was printed in Dundee in 1806 by W. Chambers for publishers in London, Edinburgh and Perth. Much of the text is derived from Hoyle's original "A Short Treatise", but with some additions - the title page proclaims it contains all the improvements of modern writers and the best players. Only five copies of this edition have been recorded by Hoyle scholar and collector David Levy in his blog; this copy is in its original blue paper wrappers with "Hoyle" stamped on the front cover. Although slightly above the 3-inch limit for a regulation miniature book, this must be one of the earliest surviving examples of a miniature book printed in Scotland for an adult readership. With its very small type and lack of illustrations it would certainly have been portable but also challenging to use.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2850
Reference SourcesDavid Levy blog: http://edmondhoyle.blogspot.co.uk/2011/06/scottish-hoyles-part-2.html
Acquired on04/05/12
AuthorTacitus
Title[Works ed. Franciscus Puteolanus]
Imprint[Milan: Antonius Zarotus]
Date of Publication1487
LanguageLatin
NotesThis is the second collected edition of the works of the Roman historian Tacitus (AD 56-AD117) containing the 'Annals', and 'Histories', the 'Germania', and the first printing of the 'Agricola'. The text was edited by the famous Italian Renaissance scholar Francesco Dal Pozzo (Franciscus Puteolanus) (d. 1490), who was professor of rhetoric and poetry at the University of Bologna. Dal Pozzo edited the texts of several classical authors for publication and his edition of Tacitus was praised by later editors for its textual emendations. This copy of the book has a notable provenance: it is from the library of the Scottish patriot Andrew Fletcher of Saltoun (1655-1716), with his distinctive "Fletcher" signature on the final blank leaf and on the rear paste-down. The 'Agricola' is Tacitus' biography of his father-in-law, the Roman general and governor of Britain who extended Roman occupation northwards into Scotland. The introductory chapters of the 'Agricola' include an account of Britain and its tribes, its geography (Tacitus is rather vague, but for the first time it was possible to state with confidence that Britain was indeed an island); there is even a mention of the "objectionable climate with its frequent rains and mists". It contains the first substantial historical account of events in what is now Scotland, in particular the first printing of the first published account of a battle on Scottish soil (Mons Graupius). After conquering what is now Wales in AD 77, Agricola advanced northwards and overran the lowlands of what is now Scotland. In his seventh campaign, in AD 83, Agricola faced a pitched battle against the Highlanders at "mons Graupius" (the precise location is uncertain, antiquaries, historians and archaeologists have been searching for the battlefield for centuries). The Britons had, according to Tacitus, rallied more than 30,000 men from all their states in an determined attempt to defeat the powerful invaders. Despite their superior numbers the Britons were soon put to flight, breaking formation "into small groups to reach their far and trackless retreats. Only night and exhaustion ended the pursuit". The Roman victory was total but the campaigning season was almost over so Agricola moved his army to their winter quarters. The next year he was recalled to Rome, thus ending Roman military campaigns in northern Scotland. It is not surprising that a well-educated member of the Scottish aristocracy, who quotes widely from ancient historians in his own political writings, would have owned a text of Tacitus. However, Tactitus' works appear to have been particularly important for Fletcher - he also owned fifteen later editions, presumably because of the 'Agricola' and its coverage of Scotland. From the early 1670s onwards, Fletcher built up a huge library of c. 5,500-6000 books, thanks to his regular travels on the continent, where he hunted for bargains and rarities in bookshops. His collection included some 20 incunables, including this edition of Tacitus. The books were kept in the family home of Saltoun Hall in East Lothian and the library appears to have survived intact until the 1940s when a few of the more valuable items in the library appeared on the London market. The rest of the library was sold off in the 1960s. The family archive was deposited in NLS (now MSS.16501-17900) in 1957 and it includes Fletcher's MS catalogues of the collection, MS 17863-17864), where this particular copy is listed.
ShelfmarkInc.221
Reference SourcesP. J. Willems, "Bibliotheca Fletcheriana, or the extraordinary Library of Andrew Fletcher of Saltoun, reconstructed and systematically arranged" (Wassenaar, 1999)
Acquired on30/04/12
AuthorAinslie, William.
TitleSixty-six years' residence in South Africa: an autobiographical sketch.
Imprint[Fort Beaufort, South Africa]: Fort Beaufort Printing and Publishing Company
Date of Publication1899
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis rare book, crudely printed in the small South African town of Fort Beaufort, documents the experiences of a Scottish emigrant to South Africa. William Ainslie was born c. 1820 in Hawick in the Scottish Borders. His father worked there as a brewer and bookbinder. In 1833 the Ainslie family decided to move to South Africa, on the advice of William's famous uncle Thomas Pringle, who had lived there in the 1820s. Pringle (1789-1834) was a writer and campaigner for abolition of slavery, who became known as the father of South African Poetry, being the first successful English language poet and author to describe South Africa. The Ainslie family eventually purchased a farm in what was then called Kaffraria, the southeast part of what is today the Eastern Cape Province. They inevitably got caught up in the conflicts between European settlers and the native Xhosa people (referred to in the book as 'Kaffirs'). From the late 18th century onwards a series of armed conflicts between the Xhosa, British army and settlers had taken place as more and more settlers encroached on Xhosa lands. In the preface to the book, written by one A. Hanesworth, it is stated that: "No savage people has given Great Britain so much trouble in open fight and secret foray as the Coloured races of Kaffraria". When William Ainslie acquired his own farm, he became a 'burgher' who was obliged to arm himself to defend his property and also to assist the army and the other settlers. As such he was participant in what is now termed the 8th Xhosa War of 1850-53, which he describes at length. In 1859 Ainslie settled in the Fort Beaufort area, where he continued to farm as well as making a brief foray into diamond mining. Ainslie's book documents the struggle of an emigrant to establish himself in an often hostile and unforgiving environment. It was written on the eve of the Boer War and he criticises the Dutch Bond politicians "who are doing everything in their power to cause race-hatred between the Dutch and English".
ShelfmarkAB.1.212.26
Acquired on23/03/12
AuthorLund, John [et al.]
Title[Volume containing 10 18th-century plays]
ImprintLondon, Glasgow, Dublin & Hawick
Date of Publication1760-1787
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis 'sammelband' contains 10 short plays printed in a variety of locations in the British Isles in the second half of the 18th-century. The volume contains a hitherto unrecorded 1786 printing from Hawick of a one act play "Ducks and green pease". The imprint gives no details of printer or publisher but there was only one printer known to be working in Hawick at the time, George Caw, who had started printing there in the 1780s (the first recorded book from his press dating from 1783). "Ducks and green pease", first printed in the 1770s, was the best-known work written by John Lund (1726-1786) from Pontefract in Yorkshire. Lund was a barber, wig maker and political satirist; the mildy subversive content of his play is in contrast to the largely religious works Caw was printing at the time. The volume also has an early Scottish provenance, there are inscriptions on the front pastedown "Andrew Rattray" and "Dundee 1791".
ShelfmarkRB.s.2839(1-10)
Acquired on23/03/12
Author[Anon]
TitleAccount of a most melancholy and dreadful accident! Loss of the Comet steam-boat. 70 persons drowned.
Imprint[London] : Printed for J. Catnach,
Date of Publication[1825]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis broadside ballad combines a prose account of a maritime disaster with a poem commemorating the event, it also contains an appropriately melodramatic woodcut illustration of the sinking of the steam boat Comet. The Comet was the second steam boat owned by Henry Bell of Helensburgh to bear this name, the original Comet paddle steamer having been used in the first commercially successful steam boat service from 1812 onwards. When the original Comet was shipwrecked in 1820, Comet II took over the service, operating routes on the River Clyde and the west of Scotland. On 21 October 1825 she collided with the steamer Ayr off Kempock Point, near Gourock, and sank with the loss of 62 of the 80 passengers. News of the disaster was spread not only by the newspapers but also by contemporary street literature, namely the popular ballads printed in major British cities. The printer/publisher of this broadside was James "Jemmy" Catnach, the most prolific producer of street literature in London, who was based in the Seven Dials area, the centre of street ballad publishing at the time. Catnach, the son of a Scottish printer, employed a number of hack balladeers to compose poems relating to disasters such as these. In contrast to the rather sober prose account (which states incorrectly that 70 people had died) the author of the ballad wastes no opportunity in wringing out every last drop of pathos from the sinking; from a newly-married couple dying in each other's arms and small children being parted from the desperate grasp of their mothers, the awfulness of the event is conveyed to a public eager for the latest sensation.
ShelfmarkAP.el.212.01
Acquired on23/03/12
AuthorLord Byron
TitleEnglish Bards and Scotch reviewers. A satire.
ImprintLondon: William Benbow,
Date of Publication1821
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is one of several pirated editions of Byron's famous satirical poem "English Bards and Scotch reviewers" printed in England after 1816, when Byron had left the country, never to return. "English Bards" was first published in 1809 as a riposte from Byron to a stinging review in The Edinburgh Review of his first published volume of poetry "Hours of Idleness". Four official editions of the poem were printed by his publisher Cawthorn, between 1809 and 1811, to meet the large popular demand for it. However, by 1812, after contemplating but rejecting the publication of a fifth edition, Byron decided to remove the poem from circulation. He then decided to switch his patronage to the publisher John Murray, which led to Cawthorn continuing to print "English Bards" in defiance of his instructions, all without payment to the author. In 1816 Byron was granted an injunction preventing Cawthorn from continuing to print the work. The injunction, however, failed to stop piracies by other printers, such as this one by William Benbow, subsequently appearing on the market. Benbow (1784-c. 1852) was a political radical, who had set up in business in London in 1820 as a bookseller and publisher of pornography. During his relatively brief, but eventful, career as a bookseller and publisher, he regularly found himself in trouble with the law due to his relaxed attitude towards the laws of libel and copyright. Between 1821 and 1825 he published piracies of a number of Byron's works, including another printing of "English Bards" in 1823. In 1822 he was prosecuted, unsuccessfully, for a pirated edition of Byron's "Cain". This particular copy of Benbow's 1821 edition, of which only three copies are recorded in COPAC, also contains two MS letters connected with a former owner of it, J. Aitken. One is a letter dated August 1922 by John Murray (IV), the publisher, thanking Aitken for alerting him to the existence of the 1821 Benbow edition, which is not listed Ernest Hartley Coleridge's bibliography of the works of Byron despite Coleridge taking "infinite pains to make that bibliography complete". The other letter, from 1938, is a copy of one sent to the American librarian and bibliographer Gilbert H. Doane (1897-1980) at the University of Wisconsin. Aitken writes to Doane having been informed that the latter was preparing a bibliography of Byron (there is no record of a published bibliography by Doane). He gives details of the 1821 edition, pointing out that it has different pagination and contents to the 1823 Benbow edition (which is recorded in Coleridge's bibliography), and offers to send it to Doane to help him with the bibliography. He concludes his copy letter by announcing his intention, ultimately, to present his book to the National Library of Scotland; over 73 years later the book has finally made it to NLS.
ShelfmarkAB.2.212.07
Reference SourcesG. Redgrave, "The first four editions of 'English Bards and Scotch Reviewers'" in The Library series 2, v.1 (December 1899), pp. 18-25. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on17/02/12
TitleA list of the sporting ladies who is [sic] arrived from all the principal towns in Great Britain and Ireland, to take their pleasure at Leith races, on Monday the 3d June 1776.
Imprint[Edinburgh : s.n.]
Date of Publication1776
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an 18th-century broadside containing an 86-line poem about the prostitutes lately arrived in Edinburgh to entertain gentlemen at the Leith races, held on the East Sands. It reviews the names and qualities of the "sporting ladies", recommending some, warning potential customers away from others, beginning with a Miss Clerk plying her trade at the back of Edinburgh's Bess Wynde, then other "ladies" from Aberdeen, Perth, Dunfermline, Inverness, Montrose, Dundee, etc., working Miln's Square, Niddery's Wynd, Gray's Close, and the Lawn-Market, concluding with two who could be found at Castle Wynd. Leith race week, establshed in the 17th century, was an important week in neighbouring Edinburgh's social calendar, sometimes leading to a partial suspension of work and business in the city. "On the approach of the race ... a great many fashionable families ... flocked into the town ... This influx of wealthy and idle people kept the city, during the whole of race week, in a state of feverish excitation, and converted it into one continual scene of gaiety and dissipation." (Campbell, p. 185). It was only to be expected that prostitutes would ply their trade for the benefit of the race-goers. The writer of this broadside concludes, tongue in cheek: "N.B. As there will be published a new List every day during the Races, Ladies who incline to be Booked, will loose no time in giving in their Names." This work is not recorded by the usual reference works, nor online catalogues. The only references to it can be found in Thomas Stevenson's "The bibliography of James Maidment" (Edinburgh, 1883 - p. 30) as having been sold on the 3rd day's sale of the antiquary James Maidment's collection on 29 April 1880 and T. Chapman & Son's catalogue of the sale where it is listed as part of lot 1000 "Collectanea curiosa", which sold for 80 shillings. Lot 1000 also included another Leith races broadside printed for 1777 (not recorded anywhere), and a broadside the "Sporting ladies' reply" (now in NLS - shelfmark: LC.1268(002)). This copy may well be Maidment's own copy but there are no marks of provenance to link it to him.
ShelfmarkIN PROCESS
Reference SourcesAlexander Campbell, The History of Leith, Leith, 1827. Bookseller's notes.
Acquired on17/02/12
AuthorDalrymple, Hew Whitefoord.
TitleProclamation by his excellency Lieutenant General Sir Hugh Dalrymple = Proclamacao de sua excellencia o Tenente General Sir Huch [sic] Dalrymple.
ImprintLisbon : Na impressae regia
Date of Publication[1808]
LanguageEnglish, Portuguese
NotesThis three-page proclamation was drafted by Scottish army officer Sir Hew Whitefoord Dalrymple (1750-1830), at his headquarters in Sintra in Portugal on 18 September 1808. Dalrymple mentions this proclamation on p. 96 in his posthumously published memoir of his conduct in the Peninsular War. As overall commander of the British forces based in Portugal he had, amongst other things, the task of sorting out a new government for the country once the French had been expelled from the country. A French army had invaded Portugal in late 1807 and Dom Joao VI, heir to the Portuguese throne and acting regent, had fled, under British protection, to Brazil. A regency junta had been formed to govern the country in Joao's absence but the French had suspended it, putting its own administration in place. In August 1808 a British expeditionary force had landed in Portugal to drive the French out of the country. Initially commanded by the young, dashing Lt.-Gen. Sir Arthur Wellesley (later to become the Duke of Wellington), the British force had defeated the French decisively at the battle of Vimeiro. Wellesley, however, was unable to pursue his advance against the French as the older, more experienced, Dalrymple arrived in Portugal the day after the battle to assume command. Dalrymple distrusted Wellesley and chose to negotiate an armistice and evacuation of the French by the British navy under the convention of Sintra, much to the dismay of Wellesley and the Portuguese. As well as ensuring that the French would all be safely evacuated, Dalrymple also had to ensure the establishment of new national government. He claims in his memoir that he was at the time "in total ignorance of the intentions of His Majesty's Government as to the sort of Regency that was to be established". After much deliberation Dalrymple decided to restore the 1807 regency junta as far as possible in Lisbon, dismissing the claims to govern of a rival junta which had been established in the city of Oporto and which was led by the bishop of Oporto. He did, however, give the bishop the chance to serve in the reconstituted junta. The text of his proclamation, printed in both English and Portuguese in parallel columns on the page, explains the current situation, assuring the Portuguese of the honour and good faith of the British army. He insists that their presence in the country is only for the "happy means of re-establishing order, and restoring to the Sovereign and the people their just rights". The proclamation also calls upon the leading members of the Portuguese regency junta to repair to Lisbon and to take upon themselves the functions of government; moreover, all inferior jurisdictions and tribunals are required to pay deference and submit to the new government. Dalrymple could later take pride in the fact that his political arrangements in Portugal received official approval from the King. However, his decision to negotiate the convention of Sintra, on terms which seemed highly advantageous to the beaten French, damaged his standing within Portugal and at home. Under Dalrymple's command the British force in Portugal became, after Sintra, "demoralized and faction-ridden" (ODNB). Details of the convention finally reached London on 16 September, causing public outrage; Dalrymple was recalled to Britain to face a government inquiry in November that year, which did exonerate him and all the other British army officers concerned, but Dalrymple was never employed in active service again.
ShelfmarkAP.4.212.01
Reference SourcesH.W. Dalrymple, Memoir written by ... Sir H. Dalrymple ... of his proceedings as connected with the affairs of Spain, and the commencement of the Peninsula War, London, 1830. Stephen Wood, 'Dalrymple, Sir Hew Whitefoord, first baronet (1750-1830)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008
Acquired on03/02/12
Author[Anon]
Title[Lord's prayer and Apostle's creed in Greek]
ImprintEdinburgh : Andrew Symson,
Date of Publication1796
LanguageGreek
NotesThis unrecorded, small single sheet of Greek printing was done by Edinburgh-based printer, Andrew Symson (c. 1638-1712). Symson was probably born in England but was educated in Edinburgh. He served for several years as a Church of Scotland minister in south-west Scotland, at the time the heartland of Scottish presbyterianism. After relinquishing the ministry, Symson moved to Edinburgh in 1695 and set up a printing press in the Cowgate. He printed works by the likes of Sir George Mackenzie and Sir Robert Sibbald, as well as Latin vocabularies for use in schools. It is not clear why Symson would want to print the Greek text of the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed (at the time the standard creed used in Western European Christian tradition, in the 16th- and 17th-century Scottish Church, every service of public worship included a public recitation of the Apostles' Creed). Scottish churches of the period would not have used Greek in any part of the liturgy. It may well be that Symson had acquired a set of Greek long primer type and was experimenting with it; as a well-educated man and former minister he was no doubt familiar with Greek texts. There is no record of Symson printing anything substantial in Greek, only the occasional word appears in his printed output. Greek long primer type is listed as one of the specimens of types to be found in James Watson's printing house in "History of the Art of printing" (1713) and it may well be that Watson acquired his Greek type from Symson's printing house after the latter's death in 1712. This sheet was formerly in the collection of J.L. Weir, former Keeper of Manuscripts at Glasgow University.
ShelfmarkAP.2.212.19
Acquired on27/01/12
AuthorDeschamps, Emile & Wailly, Gustave de.
TitleIvanhoe : opera en trois actes, imite de l' anglais.
ImprintParis : Vente
Date of Publication1826
LanguageFrench
Notes"Ivanhoe" is probably Sir Walter Scott's most successful and enduring novel. Several musical adaptions of the work were produced in the 19th-century, the first being the opera performed in Paris in 1826. This is the first edition of the libretto by Emile Deschamps and Gabriel-Gustave de Wailly for a pasticcio created, with Rossini's permission, by Antonio Pacini as a means of introducing Rossini's music to Paris. Rossini had already written "La donna del lago" in 1819, the first Italian opera to be based on one of Scott's works, which would inspire other composers to create works based on Scott's novels. Scott was himself in Paris to see the opera, remarking: "It was superbly got up, the Norman soldiers wearing pointed helmets and what resembled much hauberks of mail, which looked very well. The number of the attendants, and the skill with which they were moved and grouped on the stage, were well worthy of notice. It was an opera, and of course the story greatly mangled [Rowena and Richard the Lionheart do not appear, for example, and Ivanhoe marries Rebecca], and the dialogue in a great part nonsense. Yet it was strange to hear anything like the words which I (then in an agony of pain with spasms in my stomach) dictated to William Laidlaw at Abbotsford, now recited in a foreign tongue, and for the amusement of a strange people" (Journal, 31 October 1826). This particular copy of the Ivanhoe libretto has the library stamp of the Chateau de la Roche-Guyon in northern France on the title page and is attractively bound in red calf with lyre-shaped gilt cornerpieces.
ShelfmarkAB.2.212.06
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on27/01/12
AuthorThomas a Kempis
TitleDe imitatione Christi libri quatuor. Editio novissima.
ImprintMechliniae [Mechelen] : H. Dessain,
Date of Publication1885.
LanguageLatin
NotesThis edition of medieval monk Thomas a Kempis's famous devotional work, "The imitation of Christ" has been acquired for its modelled goatskin binding. It has been done in the style of Annie MacDonald, the Scottish bookbinder. Annie MacDonald herself invented the technique for modelling leather for bookbindings used for this binding, and other bindings produced by her and her pupils. She and a few other women in Edinburgh had only begun binding books a few years previously. Walter Biggar Blaikie (whose collection of Jacobite-related books and manuscripts is now in NLS) of the publishers A. & J. Constable let them use his workshops after hours. From 1895 two of Constable's workmen, a finisher and a forwarder, taught the group of women, who soon became known as the Edinburgh Arts and Crafts Club. MacDonald tried various types of leather for modelled bindings but found that natural goatskin, before any curing processes, could be moulded as she wanted. The modelling was done after the book itself was covered in the goatskin. It involved neither cutting nor raising the leather to relief. The design was traced onto the dampened leather and worked with one small tool called a 'Dresden', which was used to carefully press the background and mould the relief design. Using glue rather than paste to cover the books, the leather was a pale ivory when completed which developed into a richer brown once aged. Silk endpapers were used because the goatskin tended to stain both paper and vellum. The work of MacDonald and the other Edinburgh-based women inspired London bookseller Frank Karslake to found of the Guild of Women Binders in the late 1890s as an outlet for the sale of work by women binders who lived outside London. This particular binding is listed as no. 93 in the 1898 "Catalogue of the first exhibition of bookbinding by women", organised by Karslake. The binding is attributed to one "Miss MacLagan". The identity of the binder appears to be further confirmed by an inscription on one of the front endpapers: Kathleen from M.D.M. 'M.D.M.' may be Mrs. Douglas Maclagan, one of the Edinburgh women binders; 'Kathleen' appears to be one Kathleen R. Pearson who has also inscribed the endpapers with: Bound Dec. 1896 K.R. Pearson - 4th Novr. 1907. This binding has an additional significance as a photographic illustration of it was used in a promotional leaflet printed in 1898 for Karslake, which described the work of the Guild of Women Binders. The binding was chosen as an example of 'the new "Edinburgh binding"; a revival of the monastic bindings of the Middle Ages & (specially suited for early printed books and Church Services)'. The design for the front board is taken from a painting of 1878 by Sir Edward Burne-Jones of an angel playing a flageolet, now held in Sudley House, Liverpool. The date of the binding, 1896, has been included in the design. On the back board there is a crucifix with hearts. The endpapers are green and gilt patterned silk. There are also two quotations concerning the text taken from Matthew Arnold and George Eliot written on the front endpapers, as well as pencil annotations at the start of the book. A further mark of provenance is a ticket on the back pastedown of the bookseller T.B. Mills, Buckingham Gate, London.
ShelfmarkBdg.s.950
Reference SourcesM. Tidcombe, Women bookbinders 1880-1920, London, 1996.
Acquired on23/12/11
AuthorR.C.H.
TitleEdinburgh weekly miscellany.
ImprintEdinburgh: J. Elder [J. Colston]
Date of Publication1831-1832
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the second recorded copy of the complete run (14 issues) of a short-lived Edinburgh newspaper, the other complete run being in the Mitchell Library, Glasgow. The editorial to the first issue reveals that this will be a literary newspaper/periodical with a difference: 'As it is a well known fact, that many possessed of genius, and strong mental power, have, from diffidence, want of opportunity, and a thousand other obvious reasons, confined their efforts to their own solitary perusal, or, at most, to the limited circle of their private friends. To give such an opportunity of placing their productions before the public eye, a column will always be reserved in the Weekly Miscellany'. Despite these fine sentiments, the paper also relied on snippets of works taken from established authors, such as John Galt, Francis Jeffrey and Washington Irving. The "Waterloo directory of Scottish newspapers and periodicals" also notes that the paper continually stresses the evils of intemperance. Issued on a weekly basis, the 8-page long "Weekly Miscellany" appears initially to have been a success. By the time of the fifth number in December 1831 the editor refers to the 'unprecedented demand' for the publication; moreover, the list of agents selling it in Edinburgh grows considerably over the first few issues, with agents appearing in other places in central Scotland by the time issue 7 is printed. By issue 13 the publication date has shifted from Wednesday to Saturday as a result of a delay in producing a masthead (an engraving of the goddess Minerva) for the Miscellany. However, the next issue proved to be the last one, with the editor revealing that some of the agents had been less than forthcoming in paying him for the copies they had sold, leaving him unable to continue to producing the paper. At the end of this final issue is a note by the editor, asking for any unwanted copies of issues one and two, in order to make up complete sets, which were bound up with a general title page and index. This particular copy is a complete set, with a general title page which reveals that the Miscellany was 'conducted by R.C.H.'. The identity of R.C.H., who was presumably the editor and founder of the paper, is not known. The NLS copy has an inscription on the general title page: Janet Howison Craufurd Craufurdland 1833. Craufurdland castle in Ayrshire is the family seat of Howison (Houison) Craufurd family, (Winifred) Janet was a daughter of the then laird William Howison Craufurd. There is a further note in pencil on the title page stating that someone recovered this book from becoming snuff paper.
ShelfmarkAB.10.212.44
Reference SourcesWaterloo directory of Scottish newspapers and periodicals, 1800-1900 (ed. J.S. North), Waterloo, Ont., 1989, no. 2296
Acquired on23/12/11
AuthorHewit, Alexander.
TitlePoems on various subjects, (English and Scotch).
ImprintBerwick-upon-Tweed: Berwick-upon-Tweed : Printed for the author, by W. Lochhead
Date of Publication1823
LanguageEnglish
NotesAlexander Hewit (1778-1850), "the Berwickshire ploughman" published three editions of his poems in Berwick-upon-Tweed, in 1798, 1807, and this edition of 1823. He was born and grew up in the village of Lintlaw a few miles north of Berwick. After service in the army during the Napoleonic Wars he returned to his native Berwickshire where he worked on local farms for the rest of his life. The poems are divided into parts: religious poems in English and secular ones in Scots. The Scots poems deal mainly with rural life. There is also a poem addressed to Sir Walter Scott, in which he contrasts Scott's brilliance as an author with the humble output of a "rustic bard" such as himself. As might be expected in a book dedicated to his patron, a local landowner, Hewit has a conservative, 'kailyard' outlook on politics; his 'Elegy to Thomas Paine' is in fact a sarcastic attack on the English author. Only two other copies of this edition are recorded in the UK, and this particular copy has an unusual provenance. It has a sturdy, plain, 20th-century leather binding. The binder's ticket reveals that it was done by the Yee Lee Company, bookbinders based in Hong Kong. The question of how the book came to be rebound in Hong Kong is answered by an ownership inscription in the book, namely Alec M. (Alexander Mackenzie) Hardie who worked as a lecturer in the English literature department of Hong Kong University in the 1950s. Hardie had been a contemporary of the 2nd World War poet Keith Douglas, both having been at Oxford in the late 1930s, where they were students of the poet and academic Edmund Blunden. They worked together on the 1940 publication "Augury: An Oxford Miscellany of Verse and Prose". Hardie's inscription records that he purchased the book, "a rarity", in 1943 for around two shillings. When Blunden was appointed as a professor at Hong Kong University in 1953, Hardie also moved out there to work and presumably took this book with him and had it rebound.
ShelfmarkAB.1.212.08
Reference SourcesW.S. Crockett, "Minstrelsy of the Merse", Paisley, 1893.
Acquired on23/12/11
AuthorHume, David.
TitleIzsledovanie celoveceskago razumenia (An Inquiry concerning human understanding).
ImprintSt. Petersburg: M. V. Pirozhkov
Date of Publication1902
LanguageRussian
NotesThis is the rare first Russian translation of Hume's "Philosophical Essays concerning Human Understanding", which was first published in English in 1748. In the late eighteenth century, Hume was known in Russia chiefly as a writer on law, politics and history, rather than as a philosopher. In the 19th century, however, attitudes began to change once Russian thinkers gained access to French translations of his works, French being the language of the Russian nobility whose members were the main readership of his works at the time. Almost all leading Russian thinkers of the second half of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth century showed an interest in Hume, particularly in his empiricism and his interpretation of causation. Consequently Russian translations of Hume's main philosophical works were published in the 1890s and the first decade of the 20th century. Moreover, during the social and intellectual ferment of pre-Revolutionary Russia Hume's work on the philosophy of religion was particularly in demand. Lenin may have consulted this translation when writing his own main philosophical work "Materialism and empiriocriticism", published in 1909. He discusses Hume's work in some detail, dismissing his ideas as outdated. In the post-Revolution Soviet Union, free thinking was not encouraged and Hume's philosophy, whilst regarded as being progressive for its time, did not fit in with Soviet revision of philosophical heritage. New publications and translations of Hume did not appear until the 1960s in the Krushchev era of greater cultural freedom.
ShelfmarkRB.m.705
Reference SourcesArtemieva, T. and Mikeshin, M. "Hume in Russia" in Jones, P. (ed.), The Reception of David Hume in Europe, London & N.Y., 2005.
Acquired on23/12/11
AuthorJohann N.C. Buchenroeder
TitleElliots Leben: nebst practischen Bemerkungen aus dessen Leben gezogen zur Bildung junger Krieger und anderer Personen vom Stande.
ImprintHamburg: Moellerische Buchhandlung
Date of Publication1783
LanguageGerman
NotesThis is a second edition of a German biography by Johann Nicolaus Carl Buchenroeder of the celebrated Scottish army officer, George Augustus Eliott, later to become first Baron Heathfield of Gibraltar (1717-1790). Eliott was born in Stobs, Roxburghshire, the seventh son of the baronet, Sir Gilbert Eliott. He studied on the continent before beginning a long and illustrious military career, seeing active service as a volunteer in the Prussian army. Eliott also served in the British army on the Continent during the War of the Austrian Succession and Seven Years War, but is now best remembered for his leadership of the British garrison of Gibraltar. He arrived as governor in 1779 and supervised the improvement of fortifications before the impending attack by French and Spanish forces. The garrison had in 1775 also been reinforced by three battalions from Hanover in Germany (King George III being king of Hanover as well). For two and a half years the 6,000 British and German troops were subject to heavy bombardment and a blockade by the French and Spanish floating batteries. The garrison managed to hold firm, despite existing on starvation rations, until the lifting of the siege in 1783. This German biography appeared in the wake of Eliott's triumph and is illustrated with six plates, four of which are folding plates which show plans/battle scenes of Gibraltar, the other two being portraits of George III and Eliott himself. (In this copy the plates have all been hand-coloured). The foreword to this second enlarged edition states that the first edition of 1,500 copies had not been deemed sufficient to meet the demands of the wider German readership, hence the publication of the second edition of 2,000 copies, which includes a poem written on behalf of 'German patriots' in praise of the 'defender of Gibraltar'. The publication of a German biography is a testament to the role the Hanoverian soldiers played in the epic defence of this strategic outpost. It also plays on the close links between the German states and the British Hanoverian monarchy, united against the common foe, France, as well as Eliott's own connection with Germany throughout his career, which is presented as a model one for young German soldiers to follow. The link between Hanover and Gibraltar was maintained by the Hanoverian army; to honour the survivors of the siege, the three battalions that served there were authorised to wear a blue cloth cuff-title embroidered with the name of Gibraltar. Even after Hanover, and its army, was assimilated by Prussia in 1866, the soldiers of the Hanoverian fusilier regiment no. 73 wore the Gibraltar cuff-title right up to the end of the 1st World War. The Gibraltar regiment served on the Western Front throughout the war, ironically fighting against British forces most of the time, with its most famous member being the author Ernst Juenger, author of war memoir "Storm of steel".
ShelfmarkAB.1.212.43
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on23/12/11
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