Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 755 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 61 to 75 of 755:

Ordered by title
Order by author | Order by date acquired
AuthorSir Robert Lambert Playfair (1828-1899)
TitleA history of Arabia Felix or Yemen, from the commencement of the Christian era to the present time including an account of the British settlement of Aden
ImprintBombay: Printed for the Government at the Education Society's Press, Byculla
Date of Publication1859
LanguageEnglish
NotesSir Robert Lambert Playfair (1828-1899), colonial administrator and author, was born at St Andrews, Fife. He was the grandson of James Playfair, principal of the University of St Andrews, and the third son of George Playfair (1782-1846), chief inspector-general of hospitals in Bengal. After studying at St Andrews University and at Addiscombe College, he entered the Royal (Madras) Artillery in 1846. Between 1848 and May 1862, Playfair was involved in a various official duties in the Middle East: from November 1848 to May 1850 he was in a quasi-political mission to Syria; from March 1852 until September 1853 he served as assistant executive engineer at Aden; and from 1854 to 1862 he served as the assistant to the first political resident in Aden. Playfair was a qualified interpreter of Arabic, and used his time at Aden to research the history of that part of the Arabian Peninsula. In his 'History of Arabia Felix, or, Yemen ...' (1859), Playfair concentrates on an historical overview of Yemen from the Christian era onwards as he felt that the history of Arabia anterior to Christianity had already been extensively covered. In his preface, Playfair stresses that his goal was to produce a generalist history which could function as both a ready reference, and also as a starting point for more detailed work by future historians.
ShelfmarkRB.m.650
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on16/05/07
AuthorGoldsmith, Oliver; James Stewart and Harrison Weir
TitleA history of the earth and animated nature.
ImprintLondon, Blackie & Son, Paternoster Buildings, Glasgow and Edinburgh
Date of Publication1876-79
LanguageEnglish
Notes'A history of the earth' by the poet Oliver Goldsmith was first published in 1774, and was republished throughout the 19th century. The 1853 edition (NLS copy at T.351.h) and subsequent editions published by W. G. Blackie of Glasgow include numerous fine illustrations, and the original artwork for some of these illustrations has now been acquired by NLS. Blackie's chose to publish an edition of Goldsmith's work as part of their programme of scientific publications. To accompany their edition, Blackie's commissioned these high-quality illustrations, which were reproduced to a high standard using chromolithography. A comparison of the original watercolours and the published plates shows that the reproductions were very accurate. There are 24 watercolours, all by James Stewart, except one by Harrison Weir depicting horses. The images measure 5 8 inches (127 204 mm) on sheets of 7 10 inches (177 254 mm), and are in new mounts. James Stewart (1791-1863) was born in Edinburgh and studied under Robert Scott. He exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Royal Scottish Academy and the British Institute, and worked on portraits, landscapes and (with Robert Scott) as an engraver. Harrison William Weir (1824-1906) was born in Lewes, and worked chiefly as an animal painter. Charles Darwin was one of his friends. The editor for the improved edition of 1876 was William Keddie F.R.S.E. who had recently been appointed science lecturer at the Free Church College in Glasgow. Included with the watercolours is a the publisher's own file copy of the 1879 impression of this edition, partly unopened and in the original binding of decorated cloth, each volume with the Blackie bookplate. This is a later impression to the set already in NLS at shelfmark Cp.2, where both volumes are dated 1876. Most of what remains of Blackie & Son's archive is now in Glasgow University Archives, and it is good to make these missing items available to the public as well.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2649
Reference SourcesBlackie, Agnes. 'Blackie & Son 1809-1959: a short history of the firm'. London & Glasgow: Blackie & Son Ltd., 1959 http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/news/blackie.html DNB
Acquired on06/02/07
AuthorMartin Martin
TitleA late voyage to St. Kilda, the remotest of all the Hebrides, or Western Isles of Scotland
ImprintLondon: Printed for D. Brown, and T. Goodwin
Date of Publication1698
LanguageEnglish
NotesMartin Martin (d. 1718), the Scottish traveller and author, wrote the first published account of the remote Scottish island group of St. Kilda, based on his experiences during a trip to the islands made in 1697. The work was published in London the following year with some success and he would go on to publish in 1703 his celebrated 'Description of the Western Islands of Scotland'. The Advocates Library copy of the latter is believed to have been taken by James Boswell on his journey with Samuel Johnson to the Highlands and Inner Hebrides in 1773. This particular copy of 'A late voyage' has been acquired for the Library as the existing Library copy was imperfect, lacking the half title, whereas this copy is complete. It also has a noteworthy provenance. It contains the late 18th-century armorial bookplate of James Whatman, Vinters, Kent, and an inscription on the title page "J. Whatman 1800", which indicates the book was in the library of the famous paper-making family the Whatmans, either collected by James Whatman II (1741-1798) or his son James Whatman III (1777-1843).
ShelfmarkRB.s.2901
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on14/03/14
AuthorCodman, John
TitleA letter addressed to the Hon. John Lynch, chairman of the special congressional committee of the United States Senate, on the navigation interest
ImprintBoston: A. Williams
Date of Publication1869
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis pamphlet relates to USA's efforts to rebuild its merchant navy, which had been left in a parlous state after the Civil War. Efforts to restore the American merchant fleet to its former glory were hampered by an American law which prevented any ship flying the American flag which had not been built in the USA and had been launched in American waters. Supporters of free trade in the USA were anxious to improve the situation by buying the latest metal-built steamers from British shipyards thus taking advantage of advances in British shipbuilding technology. A Boston-based captain in the merchant marine, John Codman (1814-1900), was sent to Scotland by the New York Board of Underwriters to observe shipbuilding on the River Clyde. His observations are printed in this pamphlet, which reproduces a letter written by him from Dumbarton on November 15 1869. The letter was addressed to Republican congressman John Lynch, who was in the US House of Representatives and was at the time serving as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Navy. Codman, who had spent his early career sailing on clipper ships, argues passionately that the days of wooden ships for trade are over, and the current ban on purchasing the latest iron ships built in Europe is "neither more nor less than national suicide". He rails at the restrictive practices of "antiquated shipbuilders on the eastern shore" and contrasts the lack of American ambition with the situation on the Clyde, "the natural ship-producing district of the world". Codman observes that the Clyde shipbuilders are exploiting the area's "well organized system of labor, the cheapness of iron and coal", as well as the workforce's satisfaction with "moderate wages", to dominate the world shipbuilding market. Codman's pamphlet was one of series of seven produced in 1869-70 where issued together with the collective title page 'Free ships for foreign commerce'.
ShelfmarkAP.3.213.22
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on28/06/13
AuthorGirvin, John
TitleA letter to Adam Smith
ImprintDublin: Printed by P. Byrne, no. 8, Grafton-Street
Date of Publication1786
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe library tries to collect works on Adam Smith comprehensively. This is an early reply to Smith's 'Wealth of Nations' (1776) of which there are no other copies in public ownership in Scotland. It does not seem to have been known by the main Smith bibliographers. John Girvin (1734-1804) was a Dublin merchant who wrote extensively on trade policy. He seems to have been using the 4th Dublin edition of the 'Wealth of Nations', printed in 1785, for this book. He takes issue in particular with Smith's analysis of the herring industry. He argues that Smith does not understand the trade, and expresses concern for the Irish trade if Smith's arguments for changing the bounty arrangements are accepted. This is a good copy, uncut and unopened.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2623
Reference SourcesESTC N33556 'Vanderblue Memorial Collection of Smithiana', 1939 Lai, Cheng-chung, 'Adam Smith across nations', 2000 Tribe, Keith, 'A critical bibliography of Adam Smith', 2002
Acquired on13/04/06
AuthorLloyd Osbourne [et al.]
TitleA letter to Mr. Stevenson's friends.
Imprint[Apia, Samoa: For private circulation]
Date of Publication1894
LanguageEnglish
NotesShortly after Robert Louis Stevenson's death in Samoa in December in 1894, his stepson, Lloyd Osbourne, organised the printing of this small pamphlet in honour of the late author. The printing was done in the town of Apia, at the office of the local newspaper, "The Samoa times". The pamphlet gives accounts of Stevenson's life on Samoa, his death and funeral, and includes items written by Osbourne, Bazett M. Haggard (the British Special Commissioner in Samoa and brother of author Henry Rider Haggard), James H. Mulligan, A.W. Mackay, and William E. Clarke. It also includes Edmund Gosse's poem "To Tusitala in Vailima", which reached Stevenson three days before his death; at the end are some verses in Samoan. The pamphlet was then sent out to various friends and acquaintances. This particular copy was sent to the Edinburgh-based advocate and writer Sir John Skelton (1831-1897). It also has the envelope in which the book was posted to Skelton from Apia, complete with Samoan stamp, and with "via San Francisco" written on it. The address is in the hand of Margaret Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson's mother, who was part of his extended household at the time of his death.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2870
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on13/09/13
AuthorFrederick Rolfe
TitleA letter to the Marquis de Ruvigny
Imprint[Edinburgh : Tragara Press]
Date of Publication1959
LanguageEnglish
NotesOne of only two copies printed by Alan Anderson at the Tragara Press (the other copy is now in the Library of Congress), this single sheet, folded to make a 4-page booklet, reproduces the text of a letter sent in 1908 by Frederick Rolfe (aka Baron Corvo) (1860-1913) to Melville Amadeus de La Caillemotte de Massue de Ruvignes, 9th Marquis of Ruvigny and 15th of Raineval (1868-1921). This copy also includes a letter of Alan Anderson from 1992 to its former owner, the book collector and Rolfe scholar, Robert Scoble, explaining how the item came to be printed. In 1959, Anderson's friend, the writer and bookseller George Sims (1923-1999) was visiting him in Edinburgh. Sims had been a supporter of the Tragara Press from its start in 1954 and was interested in seeing the press in action. He and Anderson, selected this letter, a facsimile of which was reproduced in the Folio Society's printing of A.J.A. Symons's biography of Rolfe 'The Quest for Corvo'. Anderson printed off these two copies on rose-coloured Ingres paper for Sims and he would go on to print several Corvo/Rolfe items over the next 50 years. Rolfe's letter was occasioned by an enquiry from the Marquess of Ruvigny, a passionate genealogist, about his title 'Baron Corvo', which he had used as a pseudonym. Ruvigny was preparing his work 'The Nobilities of Europe'and was enquiring about the title's credentials. Rolfes two letters in reply were somewhat defensive, explaining that 'Baron Corvo' was a "tekhniknym", a trade name. According to Rolfe this term "is I hope as good an English word as 'pseudonym'.Certainly it fits my case more neatly ... As for 'Frederick Baron Corvo' ... it is the name under which Mr Rolfe has published certain works of Art & letters. And there I think that the matter had better rest: the people responsible for the idea being dead & I myself having ceased from using it." Rolfe's explanation was duly repeated, with spelling errors, in Ruvigny's work.
ShelfmarkIN PROCESS
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on04/07/14
TitleA list of the sporting ladies who is [sic] arrived from all the principal towns in Great Britain and Ireland, to take their pleasure at Leith races, on Monday the 3d June 1776.
Imprint[Edinburgh : s.n.]
Date of Publication1776
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an 18th-century broadside containing an 86-line poem about the prostitutes lately arrived in Edinburgh to entertain gentlemen at the Leith races, held on the East Sands. It reviews the names and qualities of the "sporting ladies", recommending some, warning potential customers away from others, beginning with a Miss Clerk plying her trade at the back of Edinburgh's Bess Wynde, then other "ladies" from Aberdeen, Perth, Dunfermline, Inverness, Montrose, Dundee, etc., working Miln's Square, Niddery's Wynd, Gray's Close, and the Lawn-Market, concluding with two who could be found at Castle Wynd. Leith race week, establshed in the 17th century, was an important week in neighbouring Edinburgh's social calendar, sometimes leading to a partial suspension of work and business in the city. "On the approach of the race ... a great many fashionable families ... flocked into the town ... This influx of wealthy and idle people kept the city, during the whole of race week, in a state of feverish excitation, and converted it into one continual scene of gaiety and dissipation." (Campbell, p. 185). It was only to be expected that prostitutes would ply their trade for the benefit of the race-goers. The writer of this broadside concludes, tongue in cheek: "N.B. As there will be published a new List every day during the Races, Ladies who incline to be Booked, will loose no time in giving in their Names." This work is not recorded by the usual reference works, nor online catalogues. The only references to it can be found in Thomas Stevenson's "The bibliography of James Maidment" (Edinburgh, 1883 - p. 30) as having been sold on the 3rd day's sale of the antiquary James Maidment's collection on 29 April 1880 and T. Chapman & Son's catalogue of the sale where it is listed as part of lot 1000 "Collectanea curiosa", which sold for 80 shillings. Lot 1000 also included another Leith races broadside printed for 1777 (not recorded anywhere), and a broadside the "Sporting ladies' reply" (now in NLS - shelfmark: LC.1268(002)). This copy may well be Maidment's own copy but there are no marks of provenance to link it to him.
ShelfmarkRB.m.754
Reference SourcesAlexander Campbell, The History of Leith, Leith, 1827. Bookseller's notes.
Acquired on17/02/12
AuthorGeorge Reavely
TitleA medley, history, directory, and discovery of Galashiels
ImprintGalashiels: T.F. Brockie
Date of Publication1875
LanguageGalashiels: T.F. Brockie
NotesThe author of this work, George Reavely (1815-1895) was a native of Galashiels, whose life is briefly described in Robert Hall's 1898 history of the town. Reavely worked initially in local textile mills in his home town and Stow, and also ran coach services in the Borders. In a long and varied working life he also worked as an auctioneer and barman, as well as spending time in North America. A true local eccentric, he was a keen inventor in his spare time, producing a variety of contraptions, including a flying machine, which proved to be, according to Hall, "a disastrous failure". Reavely's history of the town is not drawn from research into the ancient past but from the author's own extensive personal knowledge of events and personalities of the last 100 years or so; indeed the history part is "not so much of the town and trade of Galashiels, as of incidents connected with men and things generally". The book thus contains gossipy anecdotes on local worthies as well as some criticisms on the current state of the town; Hall comments wryly that, "at public meetings George was generally to the front, advocating his peculiar ideas about things in general; the kindly feelings with which he was regarded always secured for him a good-humoured, if, at times, a somewhat demonstrative reception". It is therefore no surprise that the printer of his book, Brockie, has seen fit to include a footnote to Reavely's "Apology" at the start of the work, disclaiming any responsibility for the book's contents. In the "Apology" Reavely mentions that 12 instalments were to be printed, to then be bound into a pamphlet. He may have run out of funds to produce the intended 12 numbers, as the book ends somewhat abruptly. The book was also supposed to cover, according to the title page, "a water scheme for power, domestic, and sanitary purposes, supplementing the use of fire engines, for the year 1875". However, the water scheme is only discussed briefly in the final 2-3 pages, almost as an afterthought. The provision of fresh water was indeed something of a hot topic in the town, as at the time Galashiels was dependent on various wells for its water supply; these were often polluted and blamed for an increased death rate, with three outbreaks of cholera between the years 1849 and 1853. Moreover, the population of the town had increased rapidly in the previous 20 years due to the development of the local textile industry, placing further pressures on the existing water supply. The recently established Town Council was due to decide on a new water supply for the town so Reavely advocates in his book the construction of a reservoir using water from the Lug(g)ate Water, to the north of the town, hoping that "unlettered men" in the Council were in the minority and that the rest would see the efficacy of the scheme he was proposing. The Council had other ideas; in 1876, a year after the publication of this book, an act of parliament was passed which authorised the construction of a water supply system fed by the Caddon Water, with contracts being undertaken the following year for the construction of reservoirs, including one at Meigle Hill to the west of the town. Piped water became available in the town in 1879.
ShelfmarkAB.1.212.01
Reference SourcesRobert Hall, "History of Galashiels", Galashiels, 1898.
Acquired on16/12/11
Author[Anon]
TitleA melancholy account of several barbarous murders & lately committed in the counties of Limerick, Clonmel, Kildare and Carlow
ImprintGlasgow: T. Duncan
Date of Publication[c. 1800]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a rare Glasgow broadside outlining recent murders committed in Ireland by groups of "armed banditties". After the failure of the 1798 Rebellion pockets of armed resistance to British rule were still to be found in parts of the country, with gangs carrying out robberies and reprisals on anyone with loyalist sympathies. The main series of murders mentioned here were the result of an attack on the Boland family home in Manister, Co. Limerick in March 1800. (Justice in this case turned out to be swift and brutal: contemporary newspaper accounts subsequently record that the following month two men, Henry Stokes and Patrick Sheehan, were found guilty by a general court martial at Limerick of the murder of the male members of the Boland family. The men were hanged, after which their bodies were brought to Limerick and thrown into a mass grave, the 'Croppies'-hole', at the new gaol.) The broadside briefly refers to the "state of fermentation" in "that unhappy country" but is more concerned with stressing the barbarity of the crimes being committed and also alludes to the apparent complicity of the Catholic church in the outrages by offering absolution to convicted murderers.
ShelfmarkAP.4.208.12
Acquired on02/05/07
AuthorLithgow, William
TitleA most delectable and true discourse of an admired and painefnll [sic] peregrination from Scotland, to the most famous kingdomes in Europe, Asia and Affrica.
Imprint London. Printed by Nicholas Okes, dwelling in Foster-Lane.
Date of Publication1623
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the second edition of William Lithgow's account of his travels, covering much of the known world of his time. Lithgow (c.1582-1645) was born at Lanark, and had an unusual motivation for undertaking his travels: the brothers of a woman with whom he was involved attacked him and mutilated him. Legend has it that they cut off his ears, leading to the nickname 'Lugless Will', and he chose 'rather to seclude my selfe from my soyle ... then to have a quotidian occular inspection'. Lithgow's narratives are action-packed, including accounts of narrow escapes from torture and death. In spite of his wide travels, he retained a dislike of the Catholic and Muslim religions practiced in countries where he travelled, although he relished sights such as the Sphinx in Egypt and the architectural splendours of North Africa. Lithgow's first journey ended in 1612, and his first book was published two years later (with a reprint in 1616). This second edition adds the accounts of the two journeys he undertook afterwards. According to ESTC, this copy is the only one in Scotland. Like its author, this book has travelled. It contains the bookplate of Howard Pease of Otterburn Tower, Northumberland, with an auction catalogue record and note to say that it was bought from the library of the collector S.R. Christie Miller at Britwell Court, sold in 1925. As acquired by the National Library, it came in a slipcase with the binder's stamp of W. Desmont & J. Macdonald Co. Norwalk, Connecticut, U.S.A. - indicating a transatlantic voyage Lithgow himself never made.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2609
Reference SourcesBookseller's Catalogue, ESTC, New DNB
Acquired on14/06/05
AuthorSmith, Thomas.
TitleA narrative of an unfortunate voyage to the coast of Africa.
Imprint[Arbroath?]
Date of Publication1813
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis remarkable book was written by Thomas Smith, a sailor from Arbroath. It tells of his adventures on board a number of slave ships in the 1760s. At first he got a place on board the Ann Galley in London, not realizing the nature of the journey. When the ship arrived off the West African (Guinea) coast, the captain purchased 140 slaves. However, the ship was taken over by the captives and Smith made his way on another slave ship to the West Indies. Destitute and ill he eventually returned across the Atlantic to Amsterdam and later back home to Arbroath. No other copy of this work has been traced, but it appears to be a genuine account of life on board slave ships in the mid-18th century. The Board of Trade and Lloyds of London recorded the loss of the Ann Galley as a result of a slave insurrection in November 1762. No other account of this adventure has been published and until now naval and slavery historians have been unaware of it. It may be that it was published as a form of anti-slavery propaganda. The author ends his narrative with some 'Remarks on the slave trade' and mentions how he was asked by supporters of the anti-slavery crusader, William Wilberforce, to provide them with information on the buying and selling of slaves. At the beginning of the work the editor apologises for the 'rude and rustic state of the copy'. It seems that the author was in poor health and couldn't assist the editor - 'a poor scholar' - to produce a better work. The book also carries an inscription (dated April 1904) on the front pastedown from Caroline Frazer of Dublin, granddaughter of John Findlay, Arbroath's first printer and publisher'.
ShelfmarkABS.1.206.001
Acquired on12/09/05
AuthorAlexander Duncan, 1747-1816
TitleA navy sermon delivered on board His Majesty's Ship Venerable of seventy-four guns.
ImprintLondon : J. Marshall
Date of Publication1798?
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis rare pamphlet (only one other copy of this printing is recorded, in the British Library, but none in ESTC) reproduces the text of a prayer of thanksgiving and a sermon given after the naval battle of Camperdown which took place off the Dutch coast near the village of Kamperduin. The author of "A navy sermon" was the Rev. Dr Alexander Duncan (1747-1816), who served as chaplain on the "Venerable", the ship commanded by his cousin and fellow-Scot Admiral Adam Duncan (1731-1804). Admiral Duncan was then commander-in-chief of the British fleet in the North Sea. On 11 October 1797 he attacked the Dutch fleet (the Dutch were allies of France in the French Revolutionary Wars), and after a long and bloody engagement decisively defeated it. Camperdown proved to be the most significant action between British and Dutch forces during the 1790s, giving the British complete control of the North Sea. It was also regarded as the greatest ever victory for a British fleet over an equal enemy force to that date, although it was later overshadowed by Nelson's victories in the Napoleonic Wars. Admiral Duncan was a deeply religious man and in the aftermath of the battle, with the "Venerable" itself severely damaged, he assembled all of those men fit to attend for a church service to "return thanks to Almighty God for all His mercies showered on them and him." Leading the service was his cousin Alexander, a minister in the Episcopal Church, who in 1795 had become rector of Bolam parish in Northumberland, but who also served in the Royal Navy. In a surviving miniature portrait of Dr Duncan there is a quote attributed to King George III inscribed on the back, "Would to God that all my subjects were as loyal as Dr Duncan." Dr Duncan uttered suitably stirring and patriotic words for the occasion, and was prompted to publish the words of his service by a letter from members of the "Venerable"'s company (the text of the letter is reproduced here as well as a letter from Dr Duncan to his cousin). This 1798(?) printing would appear to have been a private printing solely for distribution to various members of the ship's company (a copy of a later 1799 London printing, by a different printer, is recorded in the library of the US Navy Dept.) This particular copy was a presentation copy for Admiral Duncan, who by this time had been created Viscount Duncan of Camperdown and Baron Duncan of Lundie. It is bound in contemporary tree calf with gold tooling and has a leather label on the front board "Lord Viscount Duncan", reflecting his change in status. It has also has a later gilt stamp on it "Camperdown Library" which indicates that it was at one time held in the family mansion of Camperdown House in Dundee, built in 1828 to replace the old family home of Lundie House, which was demolished that year. Dr Alexander Duncan seems to have retired to the quiet life of a minister, publishing one further work in 1799 "Miscellaneous essays, naval, moral, political, and divine". Four of his nine sons are known to have served in the Royal Navy.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2852
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography; A. Orr, The Duncans of Dundee and Camperdown: followed in the line of the Reverend Doctor Alexander Duncan DD, [Montrose, 2000]
Acquired on08/03/13
AuthorGeorge Richardson
TitleA new drawing book of ornaments in the antique style.
ImprintLondon
Date of Publication1812
LanguageEnglish
NotesOriginally published in 1795, this reissue with a variant title and the plates signed and dated "Design'd & Engraved by G. Richardson & Son; And Publish'd as the Act directs, London, Jan. 1. 1812." A further edition was issued in 1816. The fine aquatint plates are all numbered and titled, showing examples of rich foliage ornament for friezes, designs of ornaments for chimney pieces, ornaments for pilasters or sunk pannels, etc. There is little doubt that Richardson (who may have come from Inveresk, Midlothian) was closely associated with the Adam brothers earlier in his career. At the age of about 20 he was involved, albeit in a minor capacity and under James Adam's direction, in turning Robert Adam's plates of and commentary on Diocletian's Palace at Split into a publishable book (this was published in 1764 as Ruins of the Palace of the Emperor Diocletian at Spalatro in Dalmatia. Richardson accompanied James Adam on his Grand Tour from 1760 to 1763 and had plenty of opportunity to study the remains of ancient architecture and painting. As well as the 1795 and 1816 editions mentioned above, the National Library of Scotland also holds two copies of Richardson's major 1776 work A Book of Ceilings, one with coloured plates.
ShelfmarkRB.m.746
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes and notes on A Book of Ceilings, also in the Important Acquisitions Directory
Acquired on24/08/12
TitleA new version of the Psalms of David , fitted to the tunes used in churches.
ImprintEdinburgh: Printed for William Gordon
Date of Publication1761
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis Edinburgh edition of the Psalms has been acquired because of the rarity of the edition, the sumptuous nature of the herrringbone binding and its provenance. Only one other copy - at Aberdeen University Library - is recorded. It appears to have been bound for Margaret, Countess of Dumfries, who married the 6th Earl of Dumfries in 1771; 'M. Dumfries' is inscribed in cut-out letters at the head of the title page. It was later owned by the Countess's grandson, Lord James Stuart, younger brother of the second Marquess of Bute and M.P. for Cardiff during the early 19th century. The binding, which retains the brightness of the original crimson morocco, is tooled in gilt. There are two sets of endpapers - one the original Dutch gilt and pasted onto them, 19th century marbled papers. William Gordon, who is named in the imprint, worked as a bookseller in Edinburgh from the 1750s until the 1780s. He also had the distinction of being sued on at least two occasions by other booksellers for selling pirated editions of other works.
ShelfmarkBdg.s.927
Reference SourcesESTC; Scottish Book Trade Index
Acquired on24/09/07
Important Acquisitions - page no. 1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12     13     14     15     16     17     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     27     28     29     30     31     32     33     34     35     36     37     38     39     40     41     42     43     44     45     46     47     48     49     50     51