Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 735 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 646 to 660 of 735:

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AuthorScougal, Henry
TitleDas Leben Gottes in der Seele des Menchen oder die Natur und Vortreflichkeit der Christlichen Religion [Life of God in the soul of man].
ImprintPhiladelphia: Benjamin Franklin
Date of Publication1756
LanguageGerman
NotesThis work by the Church of Scotland minister Henry Scougal (1650-1678) was first published in London in 1667. Widely regarded as an 'enduring religious classic' (ODNB), Scougal's manual of personal devotion was reprinted several times in the 18th century, the first North American edition appearing in 1741, printed by Rogers and Fowle of Boston. A German translation was commissioned by the Trustees of the Charitable Scheme [to promote Christian Knowledge among German immigrants into Pennsylvania] and printed by Benjamin Franklin's press in Philadelphia. German migration to Pennsylvania had started in the 1720s and Franklin, along with other Anglo-American leaders of the colony in the 1750s, regarded the large German presence as a potential threat to its future; the German settlers were in their eyes not only racially and physically different to the Anglo-Americans, but also ignorant of the kind of political liberties enjoyed by English and thus likely to subvert English values and rights. Franklin stated at this time, 'Why should Pennsylvania, founded by the English, become a colony of aliens, who will shortly be so numerous as to Germanize us instead of us Anglifying them, and will never adopt our language and customs, any more than they can acquire our complexion.' The printing of Scougal's text in German was part of the process of 'anglifying' the so-called Pennsylvania Dutch settlers, along with the offer of free education in English-orientated schools. Although the overall aims of the Charitable Scheme foundered, due to the Germans' understandable mistrust of its motives, in his papers Franklin recorded that the work 'proved most acceptable at this time.'
ShelfmarkRB.s.2731
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography; Liam Riordan, "The Complexion of my Country" pp. 97-120 in 'Germans and Indians: Fantasies, Encounters, Projections' by Colin Gordon Calloway, Gerd Gmünden, Susanne Zantop (U of Nebraska Press, 2002)
Acquired on19/12/08
AuthorSella, Vittorio
Title[Mountain photographs : 23 gelatin-silver prints]
Date of Publication[ca. 1880-1905]
NotesPhotographic views of the Alps and the Himalaya, taken by Vittorio Sella during the last decades of the 19th and the first decade of the 20th centuries. Sella (1859-1943) was regarded by contemporaries as the finest mountain photographer of his day and his reputation has scarcely diminished since. As well as being a photographer he was an accomplished climber - he made the first winter traverses of both Mt. Blanc and the Matterhorn and he accompanied the Duke of the Abruzzi on several of the latter's pioneering climbing expeditions. He climbed in Africa, Alaska and the Caucasus as well as in the Alps and the Himalaya.
ShelfmarkPhot.la.3
Acquired on31/10/01
AuthorSeymour, Mina S.
TitlePen pictures: transmitted clairaudiently and telepathically by Robert Burns
ImprintLily Dale, N.Y. : [s.n.]
Date of Publication1900
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a privately-printed oddity relating to Robert Burns. It is a volume of over 150 poems in English and Scots allegedly by Burns, as received by an American medium, Mina Seymour, at the end of nineteenth century. It was published in Lily Dale, a spiritualist community in south-western New York State. Carol McGuirk, writing on Burns in America in the nineteenth century comments on the frequency with which nineteenth-century Americans imagined, wished, or even roundly asserted that Robert Burns was not dead. "As with Elvis Presley sightings in our time, this is most likely a sign that mere celebrity has been transcended and cult status achieved. The cult of Burns included prominent Scottish-Americans such as Andrew Carnegie but also marginal persons as Mina S. Seymour, a psychic who in 1900 published a book said to be 'transmitted' or channelled directly from the mind of Burns." McGuirk describes the book as "Seymour's deranged little volume", and the quality of the poems in it is truly awful. In the opening poem, dedicated to the Psychical Research Society, the voice of Burns reveals that "I've beat auld Death, I write as weel, As mony in Earth life." The book is illustrated with portraits with various members of the American spiritualist community, many of whom were apparently recipients of poems by Burns.
ShelfmarkIN PROCESS
Reference SourcesCarol McGuirk, 'Haunted by authority: nineteenth-century American constructions of Robert Burns and Scotland', in "Robert Burns and Cultural Authority" edited by Robert Crawford (Edinburgh, 1997), pp. 136-158.
Acquired on16/05/14
AuthorShakespeare, William
TitleComplete works of Shakespeare in 20 miniature volumes.
ImprintGlasgow : David Bryce and Son
Date of Publication1904
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a miniature set of Shakespeare's complete works in 20 volumes published by David Bryce of Glasgow. Bryce was Scotland's most prolific and successful producer of miniature books. The individual volumes measure only 50 mm. in height and they are bound in brown suede featuring gilt spine lettering and gilt textblock edges. The set is housed in a tiny wooden replica of Shakespeare's desk apparently modelled upon the original in a Stratford museum. A publisher's sticker on the back states that it is made of oak (presumably from an artefact or pew) taken out of Holy Trinity Church, Stratford, where Shakespeare was baptised and buried. The standard reference sources on miniature books make no mention of this set and no record for another set can be found.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2757
Reference SourcesBondy
Acquired on16/09/09
AuthorShakespeare, William.
TitleThe tragedy of Macbeth. By William Shakespear [sic]. As it is acted at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane, by His Majesty's servants. To which are added all the original songs.
ImprintGlasgow: William Duncan, Junior
Date of Publication1755
LanguageEnglish
Notes18th-century London editions of individual Shakespeare plays are relatively common, but Scottish editions are rare, usually surviving in one or two known copies. Of the eight editions of Shakespeare's Scottish play printed in Scotland in the 18th century, this Glasgow edition is the third, the previous two having been printed in Edinburgh in 1731 and 1753. It was listed in William Jaggard's Shakespeare bibliography of 1911 as the first edition printed in Glasgow, but without pagination or location. Jaggard may have copied a reference from a bibliography or auction catalogue without seeing a copy. It is not recorded in recent Shakespeare bibliographies or ESTC. The printer, William Duncan junior, was active between 1750 and 1768, but printed very little for most of that time. In 1755-1756 however, he appears to have decided to issue an assortment of plays including two by Shakespeare: King Lear and Macbeth. This particular copy is bound with a [1770?] London edition of "Timon of Athens" and leaves from volume 8 of a 1757 London edition of Shakespeare's works.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2798(1)
Acquired on20/08/10
AuthorSharp, Hugh
Title[Christmas cards]
ImprintHill of Tarvit
Date of Publication1930-1938
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a rather remarkable donation which brings back to Scotland some printed items with close personal connections to Hugh Sharp and his family. Hugh Sharp (1897-1937) was the Dundee jute manufacturer and bibliophile whose private library was presented to the nation in 1938 by his mother and sister, Elizabeth. The Hugh Sharp collection is now one of our finest special collections, with many first editions of literary classics in fine condition. One of Hugh Sharp's friends was G. J. Scaramanga of Arundel, Sussex, who kept up the connection with the Sharps after Hugh's untimely death. He kept cards sent from Hugh and the Sharps in a special gilt-tooled folder. This folder of Christmas cards, which has now been donated to the Library, includes cards from 1930 to 1935, a calendar for 1937 and a later newspaper cutting. Movingly, there is a letter from Elizabeth Sharp dated 27 August 1938, which includes an example of the bookplate specially designed for the Hugh Sharp collection at the National Library after Hugh's death that year. The Christmas cards include facsimile reproductions from books in Hugh Sharp's collection, and they were finely printed by Pillans and Wilson of Edinburgh in only 50 copies each. Each card is interesting and tasteful, in decorated card covers and with coloured ties.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2340
Acquired on01/06/04
AuthorShelley, Percy Bysshe
TitleAdonais
ImprintPisa: printed with the types of Didot
Date of Publication1821
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is the rare first printing of Percy Bysshe Shelley's elegy on the death of fellow-poet John Keats. In 1818 Shelley (1792-1822) had moved to Italy due to his growing financial and health problems; he was never to return to England. During these final four years of his life he wrote some of finest poetry, despite enduring a series of personal tragedies. In February 1821 Keats had died in Rome of tuberculosis; Shelley subscribed to the view that the final stage of Keats's fatal illness had been brought on by a bad review of 'Endymion' in the "Quarterly Review" in 1818. He resolved to a write an elegy on Keats which would defend the dead man's reputation and emphasise the significance of poets and poetry in society. On June 8 1821 Shelley wrote to his London publisher, Charles Ollier, asking him to announce for publication a new poem, which was "a lament on the death of poor Keats, with some interposed stabs on the assassins of his peace and his fame". The poet decided in the end to have the poem printed locally in Pisa, rather than send a manuscript copy to London. Printing the work in Pisa meant that he could personally supervise the printing to ensure that there were no errors in the text, and also prevent any of the "interposed stabs" from being censored. A slim quarto of the 55-stanza poem was produced, Shelley sending a copy to the poet John Gisborne on 13 July. Other copies were sent to Charles Ollier to be distributed. Ollier offered them for sale at the modest price of 3s 6d but decided not to republish the work, making the Pisa printing one of the scarcest and most highly sought after original editions of Shelley's works. Ollier's reluctance to have the poem printed is no doubt due to his strained relations with Shelley. Between 1820 and his death in July 1822 Shelley frequently complained in his correspondence that Ollier was ignoring his many requests and commissions, including his request for a reprint of 'Adonais', which he himself regarded as "the least imperfect of my compositions". In this case Ollier probably had no wish to become embroiled in Shelley's attack on the "Quarterly Review", which he knew would be met with derision by most of the London critics. In the preface to 'Adonais', Shelley stresses his credentials as an impartial judge of Keats's work, noting that his "repugnance" for some of the latter's earlier compositions was well known. However, he pulls no punches in his attack on John Wilson Croker, the reviewer of 'Endymion'; whilst Croker is not named in the preface, he is referred to as "Miserable man! you, one of the meanest, have wantonly defaced one of the noblest specimens of the workmanship of God". The text of 'Adonais' was reprinted in "The Literary Chronicle and Weekly Review" of December 1 1821 but a separate edition was not reprinted in England until 1829 in Cambridge. A further separate edition was printed for private circulation in London in 1876. This particular copy of the first Pisa printing is from the library of Sir John Skelton (1831-1897), a Scottish author, literary critic and advocate. It was bequeathed to the Library (along with first editions of Shelley's 'Rosalind and Helen' and 'Epipsychidion') by his descendant Miss Margaret Penelope Skelton (1924-2011). It is bound in a 19th-century calf binding for the booksellers Edmonston & Douglas of Edinburgh. Of particular interest is a letter to Sir John Skelton pinned to the front free endpaper; it is from the poet and fellow literary reviewer Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909). The letter, dated March 10 1894, is not concerned with 'Adonais' but primarily with the 16th-century French poet and admirer of Mary Queen of Scots, Pierre de Bocosel de Chastelard. Swinburne had written plays about both Mary and Chastelard, while Skelton had published the year before "Mary Stuart", a biography defending the queen's conduct. As a postscript Swinburne notes that he has forgotten to reply to a question of Skelton's about Shelley and provides references to two articles by him on Shelley.
ShelfmarkRB.m.751
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography; "Adonais by Percy Bysshe Shelly, edited with a bibliographical introduction by Thomas J. Wise" 2nd ed. (London: Shelley Society, 1886)
Acquired on13/09/13
AuthorSinclair, Sir John
TitleSketch of the improvements now carrying on in the county of Caithness, north Britain.
ImprintLondon
Date of Publication1803
LanguageEnglish
NotesA brief description, beautifully illustrated with four fine engraved plans, of proposed improvements to 'a remote and neglected district of a country', most of which was the property of the author, Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster. The work was later included as an appendix to Captain John Henderson's 'General view of the agriculture of the county of Caithness', published in 1812. On the title page is a presentation inscription from the author to a 'General Melville', dated 30 May, 1803. Described by a contemporary as 'the most indefatigable man in Britain', Sinclair was a man of many parts. He served as M.P. for Caithness in the early 1780s, inaugurated the British Wool Society in 1791, founded the Board of Agriculture in 1793 and was almost single-handedly responsible for the preparation of the mammoth 'Statistical account of Scotland', which was published in 1799. This book is a microcosm of Sinclair's interests as an economic improver. The promotion of sheep farming, the cultivation of 'fenland', the establishment of new villages both inland and on the coast, the promotion of fisheries and the construction of a new town in Thurso are all described. Ultimately, Sinclair's 'improvements' changed the face of the county. Sinclair also had great hopes for Thurso and envisaged that it would trade with the West Indies. At the time of writing, work had already begun and Sinclair described his involvement in financing the enterprise, advancing a sum for every house built and promoting the work of the Building Society. His geometric town plan is similar to that for Edinburgh's New Town and apart from some public buildings - the academy, infirmary and public wash house - most of the plan was realised.
ShelfmarkRB.m.448
Acquired on01/12/00
AuthorSir David Young Cameron (1865-1945)
TitleEtchings in North Italy
ImprintGlasgow : William B. Paterson
Date of Publication1895-96
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe National Library of Scotland has acquired a complete set of David Young Cameron's 'Etchings in North Italy'. Published in Glasgow by William B. Paterson between 1895 and 1896, it consists of a signed engraved title page and 26 signed etchings. Originally issued in a portfolio, this set has been presented in modern mounts and placed within a specially made solander case backed in green morocco. The North Italian etchings are a highlight of Cameron's early career and include some of his greatest prints. Only about 25 sets were published and complete sets are now extremely rare. Sir D Y Cameron (1865-1945) was born in Glasgow and studied at the Glasgow School of Art between 1881 and 1884, and later at the Trustees' Academy in Edinburgh where he remained until 1887. In 1886 he exhibited for the first time at the Royal Scottish Academy and the Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts. Cameron began etching at 18 and became known for etched views of architecture and drypoints of mountain and moorland scenery. He would eventually produce around 520 etchings and drypoints of which at least 300 were done before 1900. In a career that spanned forty-five years, he would become with fellow Scots Muirhead Bone and James McBey one of the foremost British etchers of the etching revival of 1880-1930. On the strength of his print 'A Perthshire Village' (1888) he was elected an associate of the Society of Painter-Etchers in 1889 at the age of twenty-three, becoming a fellow six years later. Cameron's great skill was in the depiction of architectural subjects, conveying not only the beauty of a building but also something of its history and 'soul'. Blessed with superb draughtsmanship and technique, he was a master of detail, mood, shadows and light. Although he was a fine oil and watercolour painter, it is felt that his artistic gifts and abilities are best presented in his etchings. Following are the contents of the set, together with the corresponding reference numbers from Frank Rinder's 'Illustrated catalogue of Cameron's etchings and dry-points, 1887-1932': (202) North Italian Set, portfolio label; (203) North Italian Set; title page; (204) St. Mark's, Venice, no. 1; (205) Veronica; (206) The Monastery; (207) A Venetian Convent; (208) Paolo Salviati; (209) Tintoret's House; (210) A Venetian Fountain; (211) Via ai Prati Genoa; (212) The Confessional; (213) San Giorgio Maggiore; (214) Two Bridges; (215) The Butterfly; (216) A Soldier of Italy; (217) A Lady of Genoa; (218) Two Monks; (219) Church Interior, Venice; (220) Venice from the Lido; (221) Sketch of Venice; (222) Farm Gateway, Campagnetta; (223) The Bridge of Sighs, Venice; (224) The Ponte Vecchio, Florence; (225) The Palace Doorway (Palazzo Dario, Venice); (226) Porta del Molo, Genoa; (227) The Wine Farm; (228) Pastoral; (229) Landscape with Trees
ShelfmarkRB.l.230
Reference SourcesThe etchings of DY Cameron by Arthur M Hind (London, 1924); D.Y. Cameron: an illustrated catalogue of his etchings and dry-points, 1887-1932 by Frank Rinder (Glasgow: 1932)
Acquired on15/06/06
AuthorSir Edmund du Cane
TitleAn account of the manner in which sentences of penal servitude are carried out in England
ImprintLondon: H.M.P. Millbank
Date of Publication1882
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a presentation copy of a work on the penal system in England. It was given by the author, Sir Edmund Du Cane (18301903), to the 5th Earl of Rosebery, who was then, as a member of Gladstone's Liberal government, under-secretary at the Home Office, with particular responsibility for Scottish matters. The book also includes a brief letter, dated 7 March 1883, from Du Cane to Rosebery. Du Cane was one of the most important prison administrators of Victorian Britain. After serving in the army, where he organised convict labour in Australia, he became in 1863 a director of convict prisons and an inspector of military prisons. A few years later he took on the posts of chairman of the convict prison directors, surveyor-general of prisons, and inspector-general of military prisons. Du Cane "exercised a profound influence on the direction of penal policy between 1870 and 1895" (ODNB). This work printed at the press at Millbank prison, London, is an update of a paper originally prepared for the First International Prison Congress which met in London in 1872. It outlines the increasingly centralised prison system in operation in England, a system which conformed to Du Cane's belief that adult criminals required short, severe prison sentences. The term 'penal servitude' was coined in 1853 with the first Penal Servitude Act, which substituted sentences of imprisonment in lieu of transportation. Under Du Cane's regime prisoners could expect solitary confinement, severe conditions such as a plank bed, a very coarse diet, no visits, no library books or writing materials, and gruelling hard labour, often including oakum picking or the treadmill. The final stage was conditional release under police supervision. It was this Du Cane-influenced system that Oscar Wilde experienced as prisoner C.3.3. in Reading gaol in 1895 to 1897, and which he bitterly criticised in "The ballad of Reading gaol". Since 1877 Scotland's prisons had also been brought under Home Office control and a Prisons Commission for Scotland had been created. Du Cane was no doubt anxious that Scotland moved to a centralised system in line with England, and in the letter accompanying this book he notes that he is "highly flattered" by Rosebery's request for this additional copy of his work, which is in a "prettier" red, half-morocco binding. Du Cane eventually retired in 1895, amid growing disapproval by liberal politicians and civil servants of his methods and imperious manner. Penal servitude, however, was not abolished in England until 1948, Scotland followed suit two years later.
ShelfmarkAB.2.213.57
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of national Biography
Acquired on03/05/13
AuthorSir Robert Lambert Playfair (1828-1899)
TitleA history of Arabia Felix or Yemen, from the commencement of the Christian era to the present time including an account of the British settlement of Aden
ImprintBombay: Printed for the Government at the Education Society's Press, Byculla
Date of Publication1859
LanguageEnglish
NotesSir Robert Lambert Playfair (1828-1899), colonial administrator and author, was born at St Andrews, Fife. He was the grandson of James Playfair, principal of the University of St Andrews, and the third son of George Playfair (1782-1846), chief inspector-general of hospitals in Bengal. After studying at St Andrews University and at Addiscombe College, he entered the Royal (Madras) Artillery in 1846. Between 1848 and May 1862, Playfair was involved in a various official duties in the Middle East: from November 1848 to May 1850 he was in a quasi-political mission to Syria; from March 1852 until September 1853 he served as assistant executive engineer at Aden; and from 1854 to 1862 he served as the assistant to the first political resident in Aden. Playfair was a qualified interpreter of Arabic, and used his time at Aden to research the history of that part of the Arabian Peninsula. In his 'History of Arabia Felix, or, Yemen ...' (1859), Playfair concentrates on an historical overview of Yemen from the Christian era onwards as he felt that the history of Arabia anterior to Christianity had already been extensively covered. In his preface, Playfair stresses that his goal was to produce a generalist history which could function as both a ready reference, and also as a starting point for more detailed work by future historians.
ShelfmarkRB.m.650
Reference SourcesDNB
Acquired on16/05/07
AuthorSir Walter Scott
TitleLe miroir de la tante Marguerite et la chambre tapissee, contes.
ImprintParis: Charles Gosselin
Date of Publication1829
LanguageFrench
NotesThis volume contains the first edition in French of Scott's essay 'On the Supernatural in Fictitious Composition; and particularly on the works of Ernest Theodore William Hoffmann'. The essay was first published, unsigned, in "The Foreign Quarterly Review" (vol. I, no. 1 (1827)); in it Scott criticised the late German author (1776-1822), better known by his pen name E.T.A. Hoffmann, for his unbridled use of supernatural effects and his inability to separate fantasy from reality in fiction. The essay was hugely influential as a critique of the use of the supernatural in literature and a source used by Edgar Allen Poe in "Fall of the house of Usher". The volume also includes translations of three gothic short stories by Scott, translations of: My Aunt Margaret's Mirror and The Tapestried Chamber (both from the literary annual "The Keepsake" for 1828) and Clorinda: or the Necklace of Pearl (from "The Keepsake" for 1829, by 'Lord Normanby' but pseudonymous). The translator was Rosine Mame Gosselin (Lady Lattimore Clarke), wife of the editor and publisher of Scott's works in French, Charles Gosselin. The book is from the library of a French noblewoman Diane-Adelaide Damas d' Antigny, madame de Simiane (1761-1835), former mistress of the marquis de Lafayette, which was housed in the Chateau de Cirey in Champagne.
ShelfmarkAB.1.213.169
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on31/05/13
AuthorSir William Hamilton
TitleAccount of the discoveries at Pompeii, communicated to the Society of Antiquaries of London by the Hon. Sir William Hamilton.
ImprintLondon : W. Bowyer and J. Nichols,
Date of Publication1777
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis a rare work by Sir William Hamilton (1730/31-1803), diplomatist and art collector, who was appointed to the post of envoy-extraordinary to the Spanish court of King of Naples in 1764. Hamilton had already began to collect art and antiquities, mainly pictures, bronzes, and terracottas, before he left London for Naples. His arrival in Naples increased his interest in the ancient world and his passion for collecting ancient Greek and Roman artefacts, many of which had been unearthed in recent years at various sites in Italy. Excavation of the site of Pompeii began in 1748. During the first phase, the excavation was carried out essentially in order to find art objects, many of which ended up in the private collection of the Bourbon king Charles III of Naples. Hamilton was ideally placed to visit the site and write reports which were read at meetings of the Society of Antiquaries in London in 1775. This book gives the text of his reports and is illustrated with 13 handsome engraved plates. The book was the first in a long line of works dedicated to the lost city of Pompeii published in the 18th century.
ShelfmarkIN PROCESS
Reference SourcesOxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on16/05/14
AuthorSmall, James, 1740-1793
TitleA treatise on ploughs and wheel-carriages.
ImprintEdinburgh: Printed for the author and sold by W. Creech and C. Elliot…,
Date of Publication1784
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis book, according to the inscription on the front pastedown, was presented by the Duke of Buccleuch – Henry Scott (1746-1812) to ‘Mr. Ducket at Petersham, April 1786, with a plow made by James Small in Scotland 1786’. The 3rd Duke of Buccleuch was one of number of Small’s patrons. Others were Henry Home (Lord Kames), Sir John Sinclair, the man behind the first Statistical Accounts in the 1790s and the Berwickshire landowner, James Renton. It is not known who Mr. Ducket was – possibly a landowner in Petersham, Surrey. The book is also inscribed on the title page ‘Dalkeith House 1784’ - one of the homes of the Duke of Buccleuch. The duke, as well as being one of the greatest landowners in Scotland, was also an army officer and acted as advisor to the politicians Henry Dundas and William Pitt the Younger.This work was the first to set out the scientific principles of plough design in print and was the standard text on the subject until the 1830s. The author, James Small, born in Ladykirk in Berwickshire, learned about ploughs and wagons both in Berwickshire and in Yorkshire. When he returned to Scotland, he settled on a farm at Blackadder Mount, Berwickshire where he began to experiment with ploughs. In the early 1780s Small moved to Rosebank, Ford, in Midlothian just a few miles from Dalkeith House. As well as designing ploughs he also had his own workshop and smithy, making ploughs, wagons and carts. Small’s main innovation was in his use of cast iron and generally speaking his plough was much lighter that the ‘old Scotch’ ploughs.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2597
Reference SourcesB, ESTC T150379
Acquired on04/04/05
AuthorSmith & Wellstood (Limited) Columbian Stove Works
TitleBonnybridge price list and illustrated and descriptive catalogue of Smith & c's patent and registered American cooking stoves, portable kitchen ranves, warming stoves, for church, hall, parlour, office, shop and ware-room use, &c. Catalogue 2A
ImprintBonnybridge : [s.n.]
Date of Publication[1888?]
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis trade catalogue of Bonnybridge iron foundries dates from the 1880s, the heyday of heavy industry in central Scotland. The firm of Smith & Wellstood was established in Glasgow in 1858 to sell American-style free-standing stoves in Britain. Outlets were subsequently opened in Liverpool, Dublin and London. The firm was the driving force in persuading the British public to invest in efficient, slow-burning stoves in place of open fires. These stoves used less fuel and produced more heat than the type being used in Britain in the 1850s. The founders were James Smith and Stephen Wellstood, both Edinburgh-born entrepreneurs who had begun their business careers in the United States. Smith decided it would be more economic to produce the stoves in Scotland than to import them from the United States. In 1855 James Smith had contracted the services of George Ure, an ironfounder of some repute and a partner of Crosthwaite, Ure & Co. of Camelon. Ure opened his own foundry - the Columbian Stove Works - in Bonnybridge in 1860 to make the castings for the stoves. The finished products were transported down the Forth-Clyde canal to Smith's warehouses in Glasgow. Smith & Wellstood opened their foundry in 1873 and in 1890 amalgamated with George Ure & Co. In addition to stoves, baths, ranges, gates, railings, pots, pans, piano frames and umbrella stands were manufactured. At the turn of the century Smith & Wellstood introduced the first closed anthracite-burning stoves onto the UK market. These were modelled on a French design and became known as the Esse range of stoves.
ShelfmarkABS.8.202.01
Reference SourcesBorthwick, Alastair. The history of Smith & Wellstood Ltd. ironfounders. (Bonnybridge, 1954) H4.80.755 McIntosh, Fiona. Bonnybridge in bygone days. (Falkirk, 1989) HP3.90.453 Smith & Wellstood Ltd., Ironfounders, Bonnybridge. (Survey / National Register of Archives (Scotland) no.2198) (Edinburgh, 1989) GRH.9
Acquired on19/06/01
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