Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 763 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 661 to 675 of 763:

Ordered by date acquired
Order by author | Order by title
AuthorKohl, Johann Georg.
TitleResor I Skottland.
ImprintNorrköping
Date of Publication1846
LanguageSwedish
NotesThis is the first edition in Swedish of Kohl's account of his travels in Scotland in the autumn of 1842, part of an eight month trip to England, Scotland and Ireland. It was first published in Dresden in 1844 and an English edition was published in London, by Bruce and Wyld in the same year. This Swedish edition, of which only one other copy has been traced (in the U.S.), has a fine vignette of the port of Leith on the title page. Although Kohl covers a relatively large area, spending most time in central Scotland - Glasgow, Edinburgh, Stirling, Crieff, Perth and via Abbotsford to Carlisle, he does not venture any further than Loch Tay to the north. The author is on the whole complementary about Scotland asserting that the Union of 1707 had set the country 'on the road to wealth and improvement' and that 'she [Scotland] vies with that rival with whom for centuries she had contended with in sanguinary warfare'. Kohl (1808-1878) was regarded by his contemporaries as the most outstanding geographer in Europe; no less a figure that Charles Dickens described him as an 'indefatigable scholar'. Bremen-born Kohl gave up the study of law to travel. For most of the 1830's he worked as a teacher in the Baltic Provinces and in Russia and subsequently devoted himself to travelling and writing about his experiences. He wrote 26 separate books and treatises about his journeys through all parts of Europe and North America. He visited the United States in 1854, bringing with him an important collection of 500 facsimile drawings of maps (now at the Library of Congress) relating to the discovery and exploration of the New World. Between 1855 and 1857 he was commissioned by U.S. Coast Survey, to carry out an extensive study of the early history and exploration of the North American coastline. Towards the end of his life, as city librarian in Bremen, he oversaw the modernization of the library.
ShelfmarkABS.2.202.005
Reference SourcesAmerican cartographer. Vol.3, no. 2, October 1976 Progress of discovery = Auf den Spuren der Entdecker : Johann Georg Kohl (exhibition catalogue) Graz: Akademische Druck-u. Verlaganstalt, 1993.
Acquired on26/10/01
TitleTryal of Sr. Godfrey McCulloch, Vindicated, Edinburgh: 1697 (+10 other pamphlets bound in one volume)
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis volume of pamphlets was purchased primarily for the work whose title is given above. This title was entered in Aldis (3677) but no holdings information was provided: this work has not been traced in Wing, ESTC or in any library catalogue. It is therefore most pleasing that a copy of this elusive seventeenth-century Scottish work has finally been located. This work concerns the trial and execution of McCulloch, a hereditary baronet of Nova Scotia, for the murder of William Gordon in 1690. McCulloch had tried to claim the estate of the family of Cardiness as his own after a long feud. For an excellent account of the whole sordid affair, including the rumour that McCulloch was rescued by fairies, see http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/Heritage/FSCNS/Scots_NS/Clans/MacCulloch/Clansfolk_MacCulloch/EC_Sir_Godfrey.html This purchase complements the library's existing holding of The last speech of Sir Godfrey M'Culloch at L.C.Fol.76(23). There are some indications of provenance: on the title-page are practice notes apparently by one Thomas Heriot. On the final blank verso are other practice notes, including a passage which begins 'George Grant Cordiner'. The whole volume comes from the sale of the Birmingham Law Library, and the binding has the society's stamp and bookplate. The other pamphlets in the volume are also of much interest: as several of them relate to the radical writer and political leader John Lilburne, the Mary Robson Lilburn fund has been used to contribute £1200 towards this purchase. List as follows: (1) The Triall, of Lieut. Collonell John Lilburne, [imprint cropped, 1649], pp. 168 (not NLS) (2) The Triall of Mr. John Lilburn, London: Printed, 1653, pp. 44 (NLS) (3) The Exceptions of John Lilburne, London: f. Richard Moon, 1653, pp. 8 (NLS) (4) The Tryal of Lieutenant Colonel John Lilburn, London: f. & s.b. H[enry]. Hills, [colop: 1710], pp. 132 (NLS) (5) Vox Plebis, London: 1646, pp. 68 (not NLS) (6) The Cry of the Innocent for Justice, Printed, 1662, pp. 45 (not NLS) (7) A True and Exact Relation, London, Printed, 1662, pp. 22 (not NLS) (8) A Hellish Murder committed by a French Midwife, London: f. R. Sare, pub. b. Randal Taylor, 1688, pp. 39 (not NLS) (9) The Peoples Ancient and Just Liberties Asserted, in the Tryal of William Penn, and William Mead, Printed, 1670, pp. 62 (NLS) (10) The Tryal of Sr. Godfrey McCulloch, Vindicated, Edinburgh: Printed, 1697, pp. 22 (not NLS) (11) A True Relation of the Unjust Accusation of Certain French Gentlemen, London: b. J. Darby f. Richard Chiswel, 1671, pp. 44 (NLS) Conservation: this volume will need to be rebound and boxed. Some items discoloured as a consequence of being bound with others much larger or smaller.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2098(10)
Acquired on25/10/01
Author[Law, John]
TitleLettre au sujet de l'arrest du Conseil d'État
Date of Publication1720
LanguageFrench
NotesThese items are useful additions to the Library's holdings of publications relating to the career and policies of John Law, the Scot turned economist and banker who became controller-general of finances in France. The first item announces the success of the reform of the French financial system, which Law had directed (although these reforms were shortly to result in the disastrous collapse of the 'Mississippi bubble' which ruined numerous investors). Law's biographer Antoin Murphy describes this work as 'Law at his disingenuous best'. The second item is an attempt to justify the measures of 22 May 1720, which had involved a reduction in the price of the paper currency which Law had introduced. Both items are anonymous, but seem likely to be by Law or commissioned by him: certainly they relate to the radical policies which originated with Law. Law eventually fled France in disgrace, and died in exile. His ideas are now considered to have been ahead of their time. See Antoin E. Murphy, John Law (1997), pp. 293+, 244+. These two books are good copies in modern boards.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2109
Acquired on26/09/01
Author[Law, John]
TitleEtat general des dettes de l'Etat
ImprintParis: Antoine-Urbain Coustlier
Date of Publication1720
LanguageFrench
NotesThese items are useful additions to the Library's holdings of publications relating to the career and policies of John Law, the Scot turned economist and banker who became controller-general of finances in France. The first item announces the success of the reform of the French financial system, which Law had directed (although these reforms were shortly to result in the disastrous collapse of the 'Mississippi bubble' which ruined numerous investors). Law's biographer Antoin Murphy describes this work as 'Law at his disingenuous best'. The second item is an attempt to justify the measures of 22 May 1720, which had involved a reduction in the price of the paper currency which Law had introduced. Both items are anonymous, but seem likely to be by Law or commissioned by him: certainly they relate to the radical policies which originated with Law. Law eventually fled France in disgrace, and died in exile. His ideas are now considered to have been ahead of their time. See Antoin E. Murphy, John Law (1997), pp. 293+, 244+. These two books are good copies in modern boards.
ShelfmarkRB.m.453
Acquired on26/09/01
AuthorPater, Erra.
TitleBook of knowledge: treating of the wisdom of the ancients.
ImprintGlasgow
Date of Publication1726
LanguageEnglish
NotesAn unrecorded edition of this hugely popular text 'translated' by the Tudor almanac compiler William Lilly who used the pseudonym 'Erra Pater, a Jew'. Most of the many eighteenth century editions are recorded in only one or two copies. The National Library also holds Glasgow imprints of this title dated 1786 and 1794. This edition is strikingly illustrated with a number of crude woodcuts of facial moles and astrological signs. Although most of the book follows the standard format of the almanac with astrological and meteorological predictions and medical advice, there is also some material of a Scottish flavour at the end of the book. This includes lists of Scottish fairs, descriptions of the 'most remarkable highways' and a 'table of the kings of Scotland'. William Lilly (1602-1681), the 'English Merlin', was the most successful and influential astrologer of seventeenth century England. He published an almanac every year from 1644 until his death in 1681. Lilly's almanacs and pamphlets had a tangible effect on public opinion, and his clients included many of the leading political and military figures of an age when most people naturally believed that the stars and planets had a direct influence on human affairs.
ShelfmarkABS.1.201.038
Reference Sourceshttp://www.skyhook.co.uk/merlin/ Parker, Derek. Familiar to all: William Lilly and astrology in the seventeenth century. (London, 1975) H3.75.2171
Acquired on25/09/01
AuthorBlaxland, Gregory.
TitleJournal of a tour of discovery across the Blue Mountains, New South Wales in the year 1813.
ImprintAngus & Robertson: Sydney
Date of Publication1893.
LanguageEnglish
NotesA line for line reproduction of the rare original edition of 1823 which recounts the first European crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1813 and the discovery of the pastures to the west of the ranges.
ShelfmarkGB/A.3616
Acquired on06/09/01
TitleSett of the City of Edinburgh
ImprintEdinburgh: b. Heir of Andrew Anderson
Date of Publication1683
LanguageEngllish
NotesAlthough the library has a copy of this edition at shelfmark H.Br.6, this copy is an interesting addition to the collections for several reasons. Firstly, the gold-tooled binding seems likely to be contemporary and is quite possibly Scottish. Secondly, the physical composition of the book is unusual. The marbled pastedowns have been left with their coloured stubs protruding, so one stub is found after the first two blank leaves, the second between pages 10 and 11. The stitching can be clearly seen, revealing the curious arrangement of the last six leaves (leaves are signed D, D2, [unsigned], E, E2, [unsigned] - conjugate leaves are D1 & [E3], D2 & [D3], E1 & E2). Most importantly, a comparison between this copy and our existing holding shows that our copy at shelfmark H.Br.6 has an additional title-page which has been removed from the newly acquired copy. This title-page, which was placed before sig.A2, was clearly an error as it speaks of 'the two acts of town council', when the text actually contains four acts. None of the other copies recorded by ESTC seem to have this title-page, but in the new copy, the stub where it was cut out can just be seen - presumably it was removed from the other copies too (so ESTC needs to be updated). The work is interesting in its own right, as a centenary printing of the 1583 agreement regarding the running of the burgh, and the place of the craftsmen, merchants, bailies and provost, with the addition of acts from the later seventeenth century. However, it is particularly useful to have these two copies, as they show how two copies of the 'same edition' can have important differences. Collation: 6 unsigned leaves, A8 (A1 cut out), B-C8, D3, E3. Octavo. Contents: 2 blank leaves, half-title, title-page, 'index', stub of cancelled title-page, 'Copy of the Decreet Arbitral' (pp. 1-34), 'Acts of the Town Council of Edinburgh' (title-page, pp. 1-16), 'Act anent the Town Clerks' (pp.[1]-4).
ShelfmarkABS.1.202.035
Reference SourcesWing S2647, Aldis 2426, ESTC R217074
Acquired on09/08/01
AuthorLondon and North Western Railway
TitleBroadsides relating to Queen Victoria's journey by train from Ballater to Windsor.
ImprintLondon : London and North Western Railway
Date of Publication1876
LanguageEnglish
NotesNote: 9 broadsides showing the details of the Queen's journey on the 22nd and 23rd of November 1876. Includes; itinery of stations en route and times of arrival and departure, arrangements for telegraphing the train, arrangement of carriages, and precautions to be taken in the event of fog. Also included is a special notice announcing the postponment of the journey until the afternoon of the 23rd. The Queen returned to Windsor amid the rising tension between the great powers over the Eastern Question of the Ottoman Empire. In a letter to the Marquis of Salisbury dated Balmoral, 18th Nov. 1876 it is stated that the Queen had at one time thought of leaving on the 17th but floods below Perth had washed away bridges. The time to repair the tracks may account for the subsequent delaying of the journey.
ShelfmarkAPS.5.201.12
Reference SourcesBuckle, George Earle (editor). The letters of Queen Victoria. Second series. (London, 1926) (X.190.d)
Acquired on01/08/01
AuthorSmith, Adam
TitleTheory of moral sentiments.
ImprintDublin
Date of Publication1777
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a surprisingly rare edition of Adam Smith's main philosophical work, which was first published in London in 1759. It was the first edition to be published in Ireland and the first to be be published outside of London. Only eight copies have been traced - none in the United Kingdom. (ESTC N45628). Although on the title page the publisher claims it to be the sixth edition, it is in fact the fifth edition published in English. A fourth edition was published in London in 1774 and a fifth (also in London) in 1781. The theory of moral sentiments was Smith's first major work and after The wealth of nations, his most important. It was immediately popular when first published and the number of subsequent editions - six in English, two in French and one in German - indicates its popularity during the author's lifetime. It was warmly praised by Hume and Burke and established Smith's reputation as one of the foremost authors and thinkers of the day. It contains the sum of the philosophy Smith had learned under Francis Hutcheson at Glasgow University, emphasizing the part played by feelings in determining man's moral behaviour.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2095
Reference SourcesRoss, Ian Simpson, The life of Adam Smith. (Oxford, 1995) (H3.96.845)
Acquired on18/07/01
Title25 miscellaneous Scottish legal petitions, 1724-1794
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis volume of eighteenth-century petitions and memorials connected with legal disputes over land and inheritance contains many items otherwise unknown. A significant proportion of the items relate to estates in south-west Scotland, particularly Ayrshire. Manuscript notes record the outcome of many cases. The final item, Bill of Suspension and Interdict, Hugh Crawford... against John Patrick, is rather different, giving details of a dispute over who should be responsible for quartering soldiers in Beith in 1794, the innkeepers alone or private citizens generally. The description of the illegal distilling and endemic smuggling which had made it necessary to have a military presence in the town is quite fascinating. Physical condition: bound in a late nineteenth-century (?) red clothing binding in poor condition, with boards warped and spine lettering mostly erased; many of the petitions are too large for the binding and have been folded; some creases, darkening and tears.
ShelfmarkABS.8.201.06(1-25)
Acquired on06/07/01
AuthorAllen, Peter
TitleTravels in the Cevennes
ImprintWhittington Press
Date of Publication1998
LanguageEnglish
NotesNote: This is no.27 of a limited edition of 50 special copies of this beautifully produced and tastefully illustrated private press book. Printed using 14-point Cochin on Arches mould-made paper it differs from the 'standard' edition of 150 copies with the inclusion of two additional pochoir-coloured illustrations. This hand coloured illustration process was first used in 15th century and revived in France in the late 19th century. A monochrome outline of the design is printed by letterpress or lithography. As many as 20 to 30 celluloid stencils are cut out for the various parts of the design and special brushes with gouache and watercolours are used for the colouring. The book is an account by author and illustrator Peter Allen of his life as a farmhand on a goat farm in the Cevennes and his subsequent travels in the footsteps of Robert Louis Stevenson. There are frequent echoes throughout the text of Stevenson's Travels with a donkey in the Cevennes, but unlike the Scots scribe Allen travelled by car and not by donkey.
ShelfmarkFB.m.614
Acquired on04/07/01
AuthorMackie, Charles
TitleOriginal history of the abbey, palace and chapel royal of Holyroodhouse
ImprintEdinburgh
Date of Publication1829
LanguageEnglish
NotesNote: This is a rare edition of a highly popular book on Holyrood, with a fascinating provenance. It ran to at least nine editions from 1819 to 1832 and was one of a series of works which the author Charles Mackie (d. 1864) wrote on the castles and abbeys of Scotland. It seems that this volume may have been bound as a gift to the exiled king Charles X (1757-1836) of France, when he took up residence at Holyrood in October 1830. Charles as Comte d'Artois had previously stayed in Holyrood from 1796 to 1799, (and periodically until 1803) following an abortive attempt to regain the French throne. He had abdicated from the French throne in August 1830, when Louis Philippe had taken over in a bloodless revolution. Although this volume is ostensibly a copy of the edition of 1829, pasted onto the verso of the title page is a printed dedication of William IV, who did not become king until June 1830. The dedication first appeared in the 1830 8th edition. This indicates that this was a brand new copy of the book at the time when Charles took up residence in Holyrood, which was desribed by one of the emigrés, Baron de Damas, as a residence 'good enough for a private citizen', but not for an exiled monarch used to splendour of Versailles. The Bourbon court remained in Edinburgh for two years and it is probable that the book passed to Charles's grandson Henry V, Comte de Chambord (1820-1883). When he died, the book passed to Don Jaime de Bourbon, Duc de Madrid (1870-1931) a member of the Spanish branch of the Bourbons, whose ownership stamp marked Frohsdorf (near Salzburg) appears throughout the volume. A bookseller's label on the upper flyleaf verso indicates that the book was purchased by the London booksellers Maggs Bros. from Henry's library, probably at Frohsdorf, where he had spent much of his life from 1840. The only other known copy is in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2083
Reference SourcesMackenzie-Stuart, A.J. A French king at Holyrood. (Edinburgh, 1995) HP1.95.2496
Acquired on03/07/01
AuthorBriscoe, John
TitleFollowing proposals for, and accounts of, a National Land-Bank having been printed at London.
ImprintEdinburgh: John Mosman
Date of Publication1695
LanguageEnglish
NotesOne of the core missions of the Rare Books Division is to collect the printed output of Scotland. Of particular value are books produced in the period of Harry Aldis's bibliography of books printed in Scotland up to 1700. Although this is an Edinburgh reprint of a London title it takes one step closer to having a copy of the complete printed output of Scotland before 1700. This is a proposal for the establishment by subscription of a National Land Bank, whose assets would include the land of its subscribers. John Briscoe, the proposer of the Bank, claims that he could double the value of Freeholders estates if they subscribe to his Land Bank. To do this, he would 'turn their estates into a living stock'. Briscoe's proposals were also aimed at addressing the high interest rates that were crippling commerce in this period.
ShelfmarkRB.m.516
Reference SourcesRichard Saville, Bank of Scotland: a history (1997) (in GRR) Anon, Royal Bank of Scotland: a history (1997) (in GRR)
Acquired on02/07/01
AuthorIsthvanfius, Nicolaus
TitleHistoriarum de rebus Ungaricis
ImprintCologne
Date of Publication1622
NotesNote: This stunning goatskin binding, bound for King James I (James VI of Scotland), has been attributed to the royal binder John Bateman. The spine and the covers have been entirely tooled in gilt fleur de lys within roundels enclosing small flowers, with the royal arms gilt tooled in the centre of both covers. Appointed as royal binder in 1604, Bateman probably also used a number of quite angular cornerpiece tools in addition to thistle and other smaller ornamentations. Fields (or semis/semées) of fleur de lys were very much in vogue on French bindings from the 1540s onwards and this style was used by English* binders during the late 16th and early 17th centuries. According to Davenport, this form of ornamentation (thistles, tridents, and stars were also employed) was used for James more than for any other sovereign. These distinctive and dominant semis of fleur de lys are found only on folios bound for James and at least four other folios in this style have been attributed to Bateman. As the royal binder he bound many works for James as well as for his sons Charles (when he was Prince of Wales) and Henry, who died in 1612. The designs for these bindings were relatively simple, usually with the respective coats of arms tooled in the centre of the covers. John Bateman was one of only two binders active during the reign of Elizabeth I whose name and work is known. He was the son of John Bateman a London clothworker. Beginning on 29 September 1567, Bateman served a 12 year apprenticeship, and became free of the Stationers' Company in January 1580. He seems to have run a large bindery and is recorded as taking on a number of apprentices between 1584 and 1605. John and his son Abraham received the appointment of royal binder (for life) to James I by warrant dated 3 May 1604 for a yearly fee of £6. Little is known about Abraham. He was apprenticed to his father and was freed by patrimony on 13 April 1607. He took his first apprentice in June 1608 and two further apprentices are recorded. In the Wardrobe accounts between 1609 and 1615 there are frequent mentions of payment made to John Bateman for binding a variety of religious and secular books. Of particular interest is a mention in a warrant to the Great Wardrobe of 1613 of a number of books 'in Turquey lether wrought over wth small tools'. Bateman was one of a few binders using goatskin imported from Turkey. He was still royal binder during Charles I's reign and was last issued with a livery in 1639/40. However no bindings made by him for King Charles survive. The last Bateman binding was for a book printed in 1635. The text of the volume is also noteworthy as it provides further evidence of James's interest in European affairs. It would have provided him with some context for events unfolding in central Europe in the early stages of what was to become the Thirty Years War (1618-1648). Featured on the title page engraved by Balthasar Behrvazin (?), is a central medallion portrait of Ferdinand II, the Holy Roman Emperor, King of Hungary and Bohemia. It was his conflict with Frederick V, the Elector of the Palatinate and husband to James's daughter Elizabeth, which sparked this long series of wars. This book constituted an important addition to James's extensive collection of printed material relating to the affairs of the Palatinate and of the German Empire in general. The book is the first edition of this seminal history of Hungary, covering the period 1490-1607, a time when the Turks were exerting enormous pressure on strongholds of European Christendom. Hungary in fact had been annexed by Sulieman the Magnificent in 1540. The author, Nicolaus Isthvanfius (also known as Miklos Istavanffy, 1536-1615), in addition to being an historian was also a statesman and a soldier, who both fought against and negotiated with the Turks. Much of the work, which he wrote after his retirement from public life, deals with events that Isthvanfius actually witnessed or learnt about at first hand. It is one of the principal source books for the history of the Turks in 16th century Europe. Another edition, riddled with errors, and with an account of the siege and relief of Vienna (1683) was published in 1685. Aside from the binding, the book itself is a significant addition to the Library's collection of continental books. This is a rare text: only 4 other copies of this book have been traced, one of which is in Britain (BL). Provenance: King James I, Chichester Cathedral Library, W.A. Foyle (bookplate on upper flyleaf) -- lot 449 at Foyle sale July 2000, sold for £2350 **The Library now holds the following items belonging to James: Bdg.m.104 Chard, Simon. Germanicarum rerum quatuor celebriores vetustioresque chronographi. (Frankfurt, 1566) With Scottish royal arms Adv.Ms.19.2.6. Stewart of Baldynneis, John. Ms. of Ane abridgement of Roland Furious translait out of Ariost, etc. (c.1585) Bdg.m.89. Bellarmine, Robert, Saint. Disputationum Roberti Bellarmini Politani. (Ingolstadi, 1601) Fanfare binding by Simon Corberan, Paris, with Scottish royal arms Gray.645 Camden, William. Brittania. (London, 1607) with non-royal coat of arms K.99.a Cotgrave, R. A dictionary of the French and English tongues. (London, 1611) with non-royal coat of arms Adv.Ms.33.3.4 -- early 17th century copies in French of treaties between France and her allies 1552-1615 With royal coat of arms Ry.III.a.11. James I. The workes of the most high and mighty Prince Iames. (London, 1616) with non-royal coat of arms RB.2081(1). James I. A meditation upon the Lords Prayer. (London, 1619) RB.2081(2). James II. Two meditations of the King Maiestie. (London, 1620) Adv.Ms.33.3.3 Anonymous English treaties about the war with Spain. (c.1621) with non-royal coat of arms *See H.25.b.10 - James Keppler, Harmonices mundi libri V (Lincii Austriae, 1619), bound for Charles as Prince of Wales, binding decorated with coat of arms in centre on field of large fleur de lys within a border of thistles.
ShelfmarkBdg.l.43
Reference SourcesBirrell, T.A. English monarchs and their books: from Henry VII to Charles II. (London, 1987) Davenport, Cyril. 'Royal English bookbindings', in The Portfolio. (London, 1896) Foot, Mirjam. The Henry Davis Gift: a collection of bookbindings – v.1 Studies in the history of bookbinding. (London, 1978) Foot, Mirjam. Studies in the history of bookbinding. (London, 1993) Horne, Herbert P. The binding of books (London, 1915) Maggs. Bros. Bookbinding in the British Isles: sixteenth to the twentieth century. (Cat. 1075) (London, 1987) Nixon, Howard M. Five centuries of English bookbinding. (London, 1978) Nixon, Howard M. and Foot, Mirjam. The history of decorated bookbinding in England. (Oxford, 1992) Royal English bookbindings in the British Museum. (London, 1957) Specimens of royal fine and historical bookbinding, selected from the Royal Library, Windsor Castle. (London, 1893)
Acquired on28/06/01
TitleIn Ruhleben Camp, No.1, June 6th 1915 - No.9, October 1915, Xmas number, 1915 and The Ruhleben Bye-Election, July 1915 [subsequently The Ruhleben Camp Magazine, Volume I, No.1, March 1916 - No.4, August 1916 & Volume II, No.5, Xmas 1916 - No. 6, June 1917].
ImprintBerlin, J. S. Preuss
Date of Publication1915-1917
LanguageEnglish
NotesContents of In Ruhleben Camp: No.1, Sunday, June 6th 1915; No.2, Sunday, June 27th 1915; No.3, Sunday, July 11th 1915; No.4, August Bank Holiday Number 1915; No. 5, August 15th 1915; No.6, August 29th 1915; No.7, September 12th 1915; No.8, September 1915; No.9, October 1915; Xmas Number 1915; The Ruhleben Bye-Election, July 1915. Contents of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine: Volume I, No.1, March 1916; No.2, Spring Number, April 1916; No.3, Spring Number, May 1916; No.4, Summer Number, August 1916; Volume II, No.5, Xmas 1916; No.6, Summer Number, June 1917. At the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, there were approximately 5 000 British subjects living in Germany. Along with the crews of several merchant ships either captured at sea, or trapped in German harbours, they were detained in an internment camp - a racecourse at Ruhleben by the town of Spandau, which was then on the outskirts of Berlin. After enduring very primitive conditions when the camp was first opened in 1914, they were able to enjoy a few of the comforts of pre-war life; indeed, the internees began to manage their own affairs with no objection from the Germans, who strictly adhered to the Geneva Convention. Letters, books, sports equipment, craft material and when a printing press was allowed into the camp, this led to the production of the above two journals. These journals give an insight into how the internees, or 'campers' as they referred to themselves, tried to re-create normal civilian life. Numerous advertisements are included, from tailors, shoemakers, carpenters and barbers to language instructors, Japanese laundry, watchmakers and even a bookshop. Sports results and reports are also well represented, with football, rugby, cricket and golf being the most popular. Dramatic reviews, poetry, short stories and cartoons also featured, as did coverage of the election they held in July 1915. One feature of the camp was its own postal system, the Ruhleben Express Delivery (RXD), which issued its own stamps, but which was replaced by the camp authorities in 1916 by a less popular stamp-less service.
ShelfmarkDJ.s.807(1) and DJ.s.806
Acquired on28/06/01
Important Acquisitions - page no. 1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12     13     14     15     16     17     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     27     28     29     30     31     32     33     34     35     36     37     38     39     40     41     42     43     44     45     46     47     48     49     50     51