Important acquisitions

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Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 840 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

 

Important Acquisitions 676 to 690 of 840:

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AuthorAnon.
TitleThe balance of public favor [sic].
ImprintLondon: Thomas McLean
Date of Publication1827
LanguageEnglish
NotesA lithographic satirical print depicting Sir Walter Scott and Thomas Moore, two friends but also literary rivals, sitting on opposite ends of a giant set of scales. The scales are not balanced: Scott is seated on the higher scale, looking gloomy, clutching the nine volumes of his biography of Napoleon, while Moore, the Irish poet, is on the lower scale, looking pleased, and confidently holding up a single small volume for Scott to look at. The print refers to the fact that Scott's "The life of Napoleon Buonaparte" was due to be published on the same day in 1827 as Thomas Moore's prose romance, "The epicurean, a tale", based on his unfinished poem "Alciphron". However, Moore managed to beat Scott to the punch by getting his book published a day earlier. Scott's biography was subsequently a commercial success but met with a very mixed critical reception, whereas Moore's first novel was an immediate commercial and critical success, hence "the balance of public favo[u]r" falling in Moore's favour.
ShelfmarkAP.5.216.11
Acquired on22/07/16
AuthorAnon
TitleThe bird-fancier's companion; or, a true and easy way of hatching and bringing forth canary birds. 2nd ed.
ImprintEdinburgh: A. Donaldson & J. Reid for William Coke,
Date of Publication1763
LanguageEnglish
NotesOnly two other copies of this book on canaries are recorded in ESTC and no first edition is recorded anywhere. The text is taken from a work first printed in London "A new way of breeding canary birds" (1742), which was also reissued as the second part of "The bird fancier's necessary companion and sure guide" (London, 1760-62). The work opens with chapters on the different breeds of canary and about how to make the best choice from the birds imported into "England" by German traders. The import of caged birds into Scotland is likely to have been though Leith, at that time the main entry point in Scotland for foreign goods, which would explain why the book was printed for a Leith-based bookseller, William Coke. The book goes on to cover breeding of canaries, health tips and how to make them sing. It closes with a section on native wild birds which were often kept as caged birds: skylarks, goldfinches and linnets. The book is illustrated with a frontispiece and a plate showing how to set up a bird trap, as well as three plates depicting the three aforementioned native song birds. The plates were engraved by Edinburgh-based Thomas Phinn (1728-c.1770).
ShelfmarkRB.s.2851
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on31/08/12
Author[Binding - Scott, James of Edinburgh]
TitleThe book of common prayer + A companion to the altar + A new version of the Psalms of David
ImprintEdinburgh: Adrian Watkins,
Date of Publication1756-57
LanguageEnglish
NotesThe Library has the largest institutional collection of bindings by James Scott and his son William, the renowned Scottish bookbinders of the second half of the 18th century, and is always looking to add to its collections. This particular volume contains three works bound together in a red morocco binding which is representative of James Scott's earlier work. It combines the characteristics of the rococo style with elements of chinoiserie, a style that preceded his shift into a more neo-classical decorative influence. Both boards are bordered by a Greek-key roll, panels with an elaborate rococo decoration framing a radiating pyramid, with use of swan and nesting bird tools; the spine is gilt in compartments, repeating a tool with two birds. The binding appears datable to c.1777 from a comparison with the recorded uses of Scott's tools detailed in J.H. Loudon's James Scott and William Scott, bookinders (Edinburgh, 1980). On this binding can be found the nesting bird tool (Zo.9) the swan tool (Zo.7) and the radiating pyramid tool (Ge.2). Also present are the detached flower head tool (Bo.7) and rococo scrolls (Sc. 1). The endpapers have been patterned with a painted spatter decoration that was used on some of Scott's earlier bindings. The title page of prayer book contains the signature of the owner "Louisa Graeme" and a note regarding her identity, namely Louisa Graham (d. 1782) wife of David Graham of Orchil, Perthshire.
ShelfmarkBdg.m.171(1-3)
Reference SourcesJ.H. Loudon, "James Scott and William Scott, bookbinders" (NY, 1980)
Acquired on03/06/11
AuthorDalbeattie Golf Club.
TitleThe book of Dalbeattie Golf Club.
ImprintDalbeattie: Printed and published by Ivie A. Callan,
Date of Publication1912
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a rare early 20th-century golf publication on golf in Dumfries and Galloway. The Dalbeattie Golf Club was inaugurated at a public meeting in 1894, and a nine-hole course was created from local farmland. In 1902 a small clubhouse was erected, but proved to be inadequate to meets the needs of the growing membership. The book of Dalbeattie Golf Club, privately printed in 1912, was produced to help raise funds to improve the course and the facilities, with literary contributions from members of the club. As one author writes, "So fascinating has the game of golf now become that a holiday district without a good golf course labours under great disadvantages. A first class golf course is almost a necessity as a means of attracting visitors and, with this object in view it is desirable to have a course worthy of Dalbeattie".
ShelfmarkRB.m.689
Reference SourcesDalbeattie Golf Club website http://www.dalbeattiegc.co.uk/index.html
Acquired on30/04/09
AuthorGreensmith Downes & Son
TitleThe book of Scotch-made underwear
ImprintEdinburgh: Greensmith, Downes & Son
Date of Publication1910
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis trade catalogue provides us with a lot of very useful information about fashion in the early 20th century. It is attractively illustrated with colour plates and black and white drawings and photographs to accompany the price lists and descriptions of the clothes. At the back of the volume there is a pattern book incorporating over 30 pieces of fabric of the type used by Greensmith Downes & Son in their garments. The shop in George Street, Edinburgh was well known for selling quality (and expensive) clothing and was in business until at least the 1970s. As well as underwear the there are also sections in the catalogue on hunting jackets, waistcoats, elbow warmers, socks and rugs. There is also an extensive introductory section describing the manufacturing process, a discussion of the merits of woollen underwear as well as short pieces on The problem of shrinkage and Sweating: how far is the British public responsible. A couple of pages are also devoted to the Scottish Antarctic Expedition of 1902-04 during which the members of the expedition ?all wore complete outfits of ?Australlama? which speciality gave the utmost satisfaction, and was acknowledged by them to be infinitely superior to the foreign makers of underwear hitherto tried?.The Library also has a 1926 Greensmith Downes trade catalogue at shelfmark HP1.87.1881.
ShelfmarkABS.1.206.067
Acquired on04/04/05
Author[William Agnew]
TitleThe book of signs
ImprintGlasgow : William Agnew
Date of Publication1880?
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is unrecorded pamphlet depicts signs to be used for communication with deaf people. The author/artist and publisher, William Agnew (1846-1914) was himself deaf and left school to become a bookbinder, and after nine years went to work for the 'semi-mute' printer Mr A.F. Strathern. He is best known for painting a series of pictures showing Queen Victoria using finger spelling to communicate with a deaf woman on the Isle of Wight. In the pamphlet text Agnew refers to the incident with Queen Victoria that the painting related to, he also mentions the use of sign language by native Americans. Agnew was a keen supporter of using sign-language for educating the deaf, as opposed to using systems based on using articulation and speech, the latter approach being favoured by leading educators of the time. In the pamphlet he argues that oral education of the deaf is ineffective and expensive compared with finger and sign methods. He subsequently became involved in the fundraising for the building of a new Institute for Deaf and Dumb Adults in Glasgow and West Scotland, that would rely on instruction through sign language. Queen Victoria contributed money, and funds from an 1891 grand bazaar raised enough to purchase a site for the new building, with Agnew being made a Director of the Institution.
ShelfmarkAP.1.216.08
Reference SourcesH Dominic, W Stiles, "Deaf artist William Agnew" https://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/library-rnid/2011/12/20/deaf-artist-william-agnew/
Acquired on20/11/15
Author[Andrew Bennett]
TitleThe book of St Andrews Links
ImprintSt Andrews: J.& G. Innes
Date of Publication1898
LanguageEnglish
NotesA rare early book on golf, printed in St Andrews, which the author describes as the 'mecca of golf'. The author, not named in the publication, was Andrew Bennett, (1871-1958), who would later serve as Secretary of St Andrews University and who, in addition to his interest in golf, was a keen amateur poet and artist. The book contains the rules and regulations of the game, information on the Old and New courses in St Andrews (including a colour map showing their location) and a selection of golfing rhymes. Only 1,000 copies of this edition were printed.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2724
Reference SourcesDonovan & Murdoch, "The game of golf and the printed word, 1566-1985 : a bibliography of golf literature in the English language " (Endicott, NY, 1988)no. 690 JSF Murdoch "The Murdoch golf library" (Droitwich, 1991)no. 57
Acquired on05/09/08
AuthorAnon
TitleThe business man's note-book for the year 1856.
ImprintEdinburgh: James Hogg
Date of Publication1855
LanguageEnglish
NotesA proof copy of an elaborate forerunner of the 'Filofax', printed for the publisher James Hogg (1806-1888), the son of James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd. It contains folding coloured maps and metal volvelle on the inside board which is a perpetual calendar. The proof copy was probably produced to attract orders and as a form of advertising. Hogg jnr. in his preface states that "the aim of this work is to produce in one volume at once a kalender [sic], diary, and commercial directory, specially adapted to the wants of business men." Only one copy of the final version for 1856 is recorded, in the 1874 Advocates Library catalogue, but that is now recorded as missing. This particular copy is described as 'incomplete' at the head of the title page, as it has blank space left for advertisements and two fewer maps than listed in the contents. Moreover, the concluding paragraph mentions that an additional 60 pages were planned as a continuation of the statistical notices of the governments of the world; as a fellow of the Statistical Society of London, this was no doubt a subject close to Hogg's heart. A notebook for 1857 was published but in 1858 Hogg closed his Edinburgh firm down and re-located to London and the "Business man's note-book" was not revived by him there.
ShelfmarkAB.1.215.127
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on25/09/15
TitleThe case of the Bishop of Ross, resident of the Queen of Scots, who was seized and committed to the Tower by Queen Elizabeth, for traiterous practices, and endevouring to raise a rebellion against her.
ImprintLondon: Printed for Edward Symon...sold by J. Roberts...
Date of Publication1717
LanguageEnglish
NotesA rare work attempting to construct a case against Count Karl Gyllenborg?s treasonable communications with Jacobites, by drawing on the case of John Leslie, Bishop of Ross?s support for Mary Queen of Scots' right of succession to the throne of England. The text revolves around the retelling of the events of 1584 with emphasis on pinpointing a legal parallel between the two cases of treason. Gyllenborg was imprisoned until the threatened rebellion blew over, more as a guaranteed safe custody or protection than as a punishment.
ShelfmarkRB.m.618
Acquired on11/04/05
AuthorStuart, John Knox
TitleThe chemical experimentalist; or, an attempt to allure by experiment. Third edition.
ImprintPaisley: Caldwell
Date of Publication1834-37
LanguageEnglish
NotesWith the running title of "Stuart's Useful Information for the People", this book is an excellent example of early 19th-century attempts to popularise science for the masses. The author aims to guide the reader "towards the cultivation of the simple and sublime science - chemistry", using simple language and lots of diagrams. The book appears to have been issued in individual numbers which form seven parts. Of particular interest are the rather crudely produced illustrations, including an advertisement for the author's own popular medicines, as well as a cloth sample on p. 121.
ShelfmarkAB.3.208.01
Acquired on14/01/08
Author[Anon]
TitleThe child's catechism in two parts. The first, treating of God... The second, of mans recovery... By a well-wisher to the education of children.
ImprintEdinburgh: [s.n.],
Date of Publication1751
LanguageEnglish
NotesLearning the catechism was an essential part of religious education in the 18th century. Catechisms accordingly were a staple of Scottish printing houses from the 17th century onwards. In the 1690s a catechism for children by the late Robert Leighton, bishop of Dunblane, was printed in Edinburgh. Leighton's catechism was followed in the first half of the 18th century by a number of similar children's catechisms, with shorter and simplified text, were printed in Scotland. This particular version of 1751, by an anonymous 'Well-wisher to the Education of Children', was originally composed for a four-year-old girl, and was continued for her with additional sections until she was twelve. The last eight pages comprise "Some forms of prayers for children." Only three known copies of this particular printed catechism have been recorded, none of them in the UK.
ShelfmarkAP.3.210.09
Acquired on13/08/10
AuthorSamuel Clark
TitleThe Christian's inheritance; or, a collection of the promises and gracious declarations of scripture.
ImprintDundee: Edward Lesslie
Date of Publication1789
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an unrecorded example of early Dundee printing, being a collection of biblical references, assembled and printed here without the biblical passages, from the index of English nonconformist clergyman Samuel Clark's (1684-1750) "A collection of the promises of scripture" (London, 1720). The bookseller who had this work printed, Edward Lesslie (1765-1828), appears to have been active in the book trade in Dundee until 1820 when, as a consequence of his involvement with radical politics he was nearly prosecuted for sedition and subsequently emigrated to the USA. The work is bound in with a copy of John Butterworth's "A concordance and dictionary to the holy scriptures of the Old and New Testament", printed and sold for another Dundee bookseller, George Milln. The ownership inscriptions in the volume include probably one of the original owner, David Messan, a Dundee merchant listed as a subscriber to the Butterworth concordance.
ShelfmarkAB.2.216.15(2)
Reference SourcesBookseller's notes
Acquired on10/06/16
AuthorAgnes Bowie Shanks
TitleThe colonel's mistake
ImprintGlasgow: Nisbet
Date of Publication1883
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is a privately-printed novella by Agnes Bowie Shanks (d. 1920), wife of the Rev. David Shanks (1828-1887), Minister of Craigrownie Church, near Helensburgh. Agnes would go on to have her diary of her trip to the Middle East with her husband printed in 1887 ("Diary of a trip to Egypt and Jerusalem, 1886"). This is one of only two recorded copies, this one being a presentation copy from the author to her son Alfred in 1888.
ShelfmarkAB.1.216.12
Acquired on19/02/16
TitleThe complete cellar-book or butler's assistant in keeping a regular account of his liquors.
ImprintEdinburgh : Printed for Thomas Veitch
Date of Publication[1842]
LanguageEnglish
NotesOne of the many duties of butlers working in large households was to keep an account of the beverages in the cellar. This is an example of a cellar book which helped butlers to maintain an adequate stock for their masters. The preface provides instruction on how to use the book. The first line contains the number of bottles of each drink at the beginning of the week, the next line the number of bottles of each drink added. Then there are separate lines for each day of the week showing what was drunk on each day. At the end of the week the butler would simply subtract the number of bottles used from the total at the beginning of the week and with the new figures proceed to the page for the following week. Unfortunately we do not know who owned the establishment in question here. This cellar book records what was drunk from August 1842 to September 1843. Port, sherry and hock were the most popular drinks. Whisky, rum and liqueurs were rarely drunk while the columns for porter, ales and 'cyder' were not added to throughout the year. There were two weeks during the year when a lot of stock was consumed  Christmas and the week of 5 March 1843. During the latter week, 2 bottles of port were drunk, 6 of sherry, 1 of madeira, 2 of claret(1819), 7 of hock, 5 of St. Julien, 2 of sherry, 1 of claret (1815) and 1 of claret (1825).
ShelfmarkAP.4.207.10
Acquired on20/02/07
TitleThe complete pocket book or, gentleman and trademan's daily journal, for the year of our Lord 1764.
ImprintLondon: Printed for J. Johnson
Date of Publication1763
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis work, of which only one copy is recorded in the UK, contains a fascinating record of accounts and appointments of a relative or employee of James Duff, the second Earl of Fife (1729-1809). This unnamed individual seems to have been based in London sorting out the business affairs of Lord and Lady Fife. He records his correspondence with them and the payments he makes on their behalf. The Earl of Fife was MP for Banff between 1754 and 1780. He married Lady Dorothea Sinclair (Lady Fife) in 1759. In 1763, the year in which this volume was published, he succeeded his father in the title and estates, mainly in Aberdeen and Moray. The Earl devoted himself to the improvement of the property, which he greatly increased by the purchase of land in the north of Scotland. Most of the entries, however, concern the expenses of the Earl's man in London. For example, he was a frequent visitor to the Smyrna Coffee House in Pall Mall, a popular meeting place for Whigs during this period. He also went regularly to the theatre and the opera - both Drury Lane and Covent Garden are mentioned throughout. This was a man who was also concerned with his appearance: nosegays, shaving powder and toothpicks as well as payments to his hairdresser are recorded. He hired coaches and chairs, the 18th-century equivalents of black cabs. He also bought snuff, gloves, sealing-wax, fruit, woodcocks, teal and turkey and gave money to charity almost on a weekly basis.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2633
Acquired on16/10/06
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