Rare Books - Important Acquisitions List All

Rare Book Collections works to build up the national collections through purchases (through dealers or at auction) and donations. This directory gives details of 755 of the most important items we have acquired since 2000. We update it regularly as new material comes in. The description gives information about why it was chosen and what makes it particularly interesting. You can order the list by date of acquisition, author or title.

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. Email us at rarebooks@nls.uk

      

Important Acquisitions 751 to 765 of 755:

Ordered by author
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AuthorWood, Lawson, 1878-1957
TitleWee scrap o' paper is Britain's bond
Date of Publication1914
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis striking print by the illustator Lawson Wood portrays a Gordon Highlander standing with a rifle on a street corner in a Flemish town. The purpose of the print is not clear - in this case it has been used to advertise 'ceilidh and dance village hall Saturday'. This is written in ink on a slip of paper attached to the foot of the print. Directly underneath the soldier is the phrase 'A wee "scrap of paper" is Britain's bond', referring to Britain's signature in 1830 to the Treaty of London to guarantee the independence of Belgium. Germany wanted Britain to disregard this agreement, describing it as a mere 'scrap of paper'. The print is signed and dated 'Lawson Wood '14'. Wood was an artist and illustrator and best known for his caricatures, including those of army officers. But there is no hint of the caricature in this instance. He himself served as an officer in the Kite Balloon Wing of the Royal Flying Corps and was decorated for his action over Vimy Ridge. The Second Battalion of the Gordon Highlanders were recalled from Egypt when the war broke out and made their way through Holland to Loos and Ypres and eventually took part in the Battle of the Somme in 1916. The Gordon Highlanders lost a total of 29,000 men during the war.
ShelfmarkRB.l.228
Reference SourcesDictionary of 19th century British book illustrators / Simon Houfe
Acquired on24/05/04
AuthorWootton, John
TitleHis Royal Highness, William Duke of Cumberland
ImprintLondon: Bernard Baron
Date of Publication1747
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis engraving was executed by B. Baron after a painting by John Wootton (ca. 1686-1765). This pose has been reproduced in a number of other paintings and engravings of Cumberland. The BM catalogue of British engraved portraits (Vol.4, 1914, p.495) lists 43 engraved portraits in total of the victor of Culloden. The artist John Wootton was a popular painter of landscapes, topographical views, battle and sporting scenes but he was best known as an equestrian artist. He was the first Englishman to paint horses and he worked at Newmarket for a while. The engraving shows Cumberland in complete control of proceedings at Culloden with an unfortunate Jacobite swordsman cowering at his feet. This is a significant addition to the National Library's holdings of Jacobite material, notably to the Blaikie prints on deposit at the Scottish National Portrait. There are nearly 20 other engravings of Cumberland held there.
ShelfmarkRB.case
Reference SourcesSharp, Richard. The engraved record of the Jacobite movement. Scolar Press, 1996. HP4.97.202
Acquired on10/07/03
AuthorWotherspoon, John and Stevenson, William
TitleThe weaver's pocket companion
ImprintGlasgow: David Niven,
Date of Publication1796
LanguageEnglish
NotesThis is an unrecorded second printing of a work which was first published in Glasgow in 1779. The first edition is also very rare, only two copies recorded in ESTC at NLS and the Mitchell Library, Glasgow. The book is one of several such 'companions' produced by and for members of the weaving community in the west of Scotland, who were noted for their high level of education. It gives practical advice and a series of tables to help weavers produce the right quantity and quality of cloth. The fact that so few copies of either edition of Wotherspoon and Stevenson's companion survive is probably testament to their heavy use by individual handloom weavers. After the mechanisation of cloth production in factories in the early 19th century, the handloom weavers, and by extension these printed weaving companions, became largely redundant.
ShelfmarkRB.s.2736
Acquired on02/02/09
AuthorWright, Robert W.
TitleOn foot from Edinburgh to Inverness. On foot through the Lake district. On foot from Oxford to Exeter. On foot John o' Groats to Lands End. [4 items]
ImprintCheadlehulme, Cheshire
Date of Publication1928-1933
LanguageEnglish
NotesThese four privately printed volumes of topographical verse by Robert W. Wright were issued as Christmas presents to friends. It appears that in 1927 Mr. Wright (who was from Cheshire) visited Hawick in the course of one of his pedestrian adventures and made the acquaintance of a Mrs. Storic and her family. His accounts of his walks from Edinburgh to Inverness and from Oxford to Exeter are incorporated into his most substantial work which covers John o'Groats to Lands End. The 'pilgrimage' as he describes it was accomplished over a period of seven years, with 'no advantage being taken of the ferries across the estuaries of rivers, the avoidance of which has added considerably to the mileage'. Wright and his companions walked along the roads, which were apparently still not very busy with motorised transport. The tone of the verse is generally light-hearted. Wright comments on the scenery, the architecture and the weather and is generally positive about his experiences. Occasionally he is critical as when he chides the city authorities of Edinburgh about 'the mountains of rubbish and shale of all kinds & disfigure the prospect' to the south of the city. The border town of Longtown, Cumberland, impresses him the least describing it as a 'small and slovenly bungalow town, which stands in the order of merit low down'. In August 1932 Wright and a few of his friends walked through the Lake District and a further volume was presented to friends the following year. Unlike the other volumes, this volume is illustrated with sketches and photographs which show a trio of bowler-hatted elderly gentlemen attired more for a day in the office than for a long walk through the countryside.
ShelfmarkFB.s.945(1-4)
Acquired on12/03/07
AuthorWurtisen, Christian (editor)
TitleGermaniae historicorum illustrium
ImprintFrankfurt: apud heredes Andreae Wecheli
Date of Publication1585
LanguageLatin
NotesThis intricate and elaborate early 17th century Scottish binding (c.1620-1630) has an interesting history. It is part of a well-known set of early blind-stamped Scottish bindings produced for Sir Thomas Henryson, (or Henrison) Lord Chesters, who was knighted and appointed as an Ordinary Lord of Session, in 1622. The armorial stamp, with the initials 'MTH' on the covers is an early state - the later stamps had an 'S' added, presumably to indicate 'Sir'. About a century and a half (circa 1778) after the book was first bound, the doyen of Scottish binders, James Scott was commissioned by William John Kerr, 5th Marquess of Lothian, to relabel and embellish with gilt tooling the spines of about 400 volumes in the family library at Newbattle Abbey. It is probable because of the volume of books involved that Scott worked in situ at Newbattle. The book remained in the Lothian family until 1951 and subsequently was sold by Christies and Maggs (twice) and for a few years it was in the collection of J.R. Abbey.
ShelfmarkBdg.m.148
Acquired on05/09/00
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