Important acquisitions

Enquiry into the nature of the Corn-Laws; With a View to the New Corn-Bill Proposed for Scotland

Author Anderson, James
Title Enquiry into the nature of the Corn-Laws; With a View to the New Corn-Bill Proposed for Scotland
Imprint Edinburgh, Mrs Mundell
Date of Publication 1777
Language English
Notes 8vo pp. 60 [1] author's apology, [1] blank with an inscription 'To Barond de Podmaniesky, From the Author' on the verso of the flyleaf facing the title. Yet another key text composed by a Scot that explained for the first time one of the main components of economic theory. According to Schumpeter, Anderson 'invented the 'Ricardian' theory of rent' and 'had to an unusual degree what so many economists lack, Vision'. Further praise came when in 1845, J. R. McCulloch wrote 'Though published nearly at the same time as the 'Wealth of Nations', Dr Smith, to whom they might have been of essential service, did not profit by them in revising any subsequent edition of his great work; and so completely were they forgotten, that when, in 1815, Mr Malthus and Sir Edward West published their tracts exhibiting the nature and progress of rent, they were universally believed to have, for the first time, discovered the laws by which it is governed [however] the true theory of rent had been quite as well and as satisfactorily explained by Dr Anderson in 1777 as it was by them in 1815.' Anderson was born in 1739 in Hermiston At age 15 he began working on a farm in Aberdeenshire where he invented the Scotch plough. In 1780 he took an LL.D degree at Aberdeen. In 1783 he had privately printed observations on fisheries in the West of Scotland; between 1790-1793 he edited the journal 'The Bee' which contained many informative papers on economic development. He lived in London from 1797 and died 1808.
Shelfmark RB.s.2084
Acquired on 06/10/00
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