Rare Books - Important Acquisitions - In Ruhleben Camp, No.1, June 6th 1915 - No.9, October 1915, Xmas number, 1915 and The Ruhleben Bye-Election, July 1915 [subsequently The Ruhleben Camp Magazine, Volume I, No.1, March 1916 - No.4, August 1916 & Volume II, No.5, Xmas 1916 - No. 6, June 1917].

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Title In Ruhleben Camp, No.1, June 6th 1915 - No.9, October 1915, Xmas number, 1915 and The Ruhleben Bye-Election, July 1915 [subsequently The Ruhleben Camp Magazine, Volume I, No.1, March 1916 - No.4, August 1916 & Volume II, No.5, Xmas 1916 - No. 6, June 1917].
Imprint Berlin, J. S. Preuss
Date of Publication 1915-1917
Language English
Notes Contents of In Ruhleben Camp: No.1, Sunday, June 6th 1915; No.2, Sunday, June 27th 1915; No.3, Sunday, July 11th 1915; No.4, August Bank Holiday Number 1915; No. 5, August 15th 1915; No.6, August 29th 1915; No.7, September 12th 1915; No.8, September 1915; No.9, October 1915; Xmas Number 1915; The Ruhleben Bye-Election, July 1915. Contents of The Ruhleben Camp Magazine: Volume I, No.1, March 1916; No.2, Spring Number, April 1916; No.3, Spring Number, May 1916; No.4, Summer Number, August 1916; Volume II, No.5, Xmas 1916; No.6, Summer Number, June 1917. At the outbreak of the Great War in 1914, there were approximately 5 000 British subjects living in Germany. Along with the crews of several merchant ships either captured at sea, or trapped in German harbours, they were detained in an internment camp - a racecourse at Ruhleben by the town of Spandau, which was then on the outskirts of Berlin. After enduring very primitive conditions when the camp was first opened in 1914, they were able to enjoy a few of the comforts of pre-war life; indeed, the internees began to manage their own affairs with no objection from the Germans, who strictly adhered to the Geneva Convention. Letters, books, sports equipment, craft material and when a printing press was allowed into the camp, this led to the production of the above two journals. These journals give an insight into how the internees, or 'campers' as they referred to themselves, tried to re-create normal civilian life. Numerous advertisements are included, from tailors, shoemakers, carpenters and barbers to language instructors, Japanese laundry, watchmakers and even a bookshop. Sports results and reports are also well represented, with football, rugby, cricket and golf being the most popular. Dramatic reviews, poetry, short stories and cartoons also featured, as did coverage of the election they held in July 1915. One feature of the camp was its own postal system, the Ruhleben Express Delivery (RXD), which issued its own stamps, but which was replaced by the camp authorities in 1916 by a less popular stamp-less service.
Shelfmark DJ.s.807(1) and DJ.s.806
Acquired on 28/06/01
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