Important acquisitions

Directions for raising flax

Author Commissioners and trustees for fisheries, manufactures and improvements in Scotland
Title Directions for raising flax
Imprint Edinburgh
Date of Publication 1763
Language English
Notes This rare pamphlet provides practical instructions for farmers who wished to grow flax. This crop had been grown to produce linen in Scotland as early as 1000 B.C. and in the eighteenth century, the linen industry was one of the most important in the country. The Act of Union of 1707 did not immediately have the desired effect of giving linen manufacturers access to new markets. The Board of Trustees for Fisheries and Manufactures, established in 1727, tried to encourage the growth of more flax as the industry was largely dependent on imports from Holland and the Baltic. This pamphlet includes information on choosing 'lintseed' (linseed), weeding, harvesting, stacking 'winning' (winnowing), watering and grassing (drying) flax. Further revised and extended editions were published in 1772 and 1781. By 1782 it seemed that such instructions were having an effect, as Scotland became almost self-sufficient in flax. It was mainly grown in the counties of Forfar, Renfrew, Lanark, Perth and Fife, where some farms grew as many as 50 acres of flax per year. By the 1830s, flax was in decline. Hand-loom weavers in the countryside found that the power loom was reducing their profits to almost nothing. Consequently the farmers ceased to grow flax and changed over to turnips and potatoes. The only other copy of this pamphlet is held at the British Library.
Shelfmark ABS.1.205.015
Reference Sources T. Bedford Franklin, A history of Scottish farming. London, 1952M.L. Parry and T.R. Slater. (eds)The making of the Scottish countryside. Montreal, 1980.Alastair J. Durie (ed.). The British Linen Company. Edinburgh, 1996.
Acquired on 10/06/05
Search for Important Acquisitions
      

 

Please let us know what you think of this resource, if you have information to add about an acquisition, or if you have rare Scottish books that you would like to donate or sell. E-mail us at rarebooks@nls.uk

Back to Important Acquisitions Introduction