Important acquisitions

Beschreibung der Reisen und entdeckungen im Noerdlichen und Mittlern Africa

Author Denham, Dixon, Clapperton, Hugh & Oudney, Walter
Title Beschreibung der Reisen und entdeckungen im Noerdlichen und Mittlern Africa
Imprint Weimar: Im Verlage des Landes-Industrie-Comptoirs
Date of Publication 1827
Language German
Notes First edition in German of a classic travel book "Narrative of the travels and discoveries in Northern and Central Africa in the years 1822, 1823 and 1824". The author, an Englishman, Dixon Denham, had set out on a mission for the Colonial Office with two Scots, Hugh Clapperton and Walter Oudney, to do what Mungo Park had failed to accomplish, namely to trace the course of the Niger River. Unlike Park, who travelled eastwards from the west coast of Africa, the three explorers set out from North Africa in 1822 and travelled southwards. They failed in their mission but did explore areas of Central Africa hitherto unknown to Europeans, including Lake Chad, and they were able to establish that the Niger did not flow into it. Relations between Denham and the two Scots quickly deteriorated during the expedition and they went their separate ways. Oudney died in Africa in 1824 and Denham and Clapperton eventually reunited to make it back to Tripoli in 1825. While Clapperton returned to Africa to resume exploring, Denham returned to Britain and wrote this account of their expedition, in which he made little mention of his travelling companions and claimed some of their achievements and discoveries for his own. This German edition includes 3 plates: a map of the area covered by the expedition, and representations of Central African tribesmen
Shelfmark AB.3.208.08
Reference Sources DNB; Fergus Fleming "Barrow's Boys"
Acquired on 07/02/08
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