Important acquisitions

The acts & orders of the meeting of the Estates of the Kingdom of Scotland, holden and begun at Edinburgh, the 14th Day of March 1689.

Author Scotland. Convention of Estates.
Title The acts & orders of the meeting of the Estates of the Kingdom of Scotland, holden and begun at Edinburgh, the 14th Day of March 1689.
Imprint Edinburgh: Printed by the heir of Andrew Anderson
Date of Publication 1690
Language English
Notes This copy of the Acts and Orders (ESTC R033742), covering the early years of the rule of William and Mary, has an interesting provenance. On the contemporary binding is stamped in gold 'For the Browgh of Linlithgow', and inside is an inscription 'ex Dono Guiliemi Higginij Pastoris apud Tweedsmuirij'. This William Higgins (d.1718) sat for six sessions (1689-1700) as Member of the Scottish Parliament for the burgh of Linlithgow. Both his election and standing down set precedents. The Parliamentary Register of 1689 records that the Linlithgow election was contested by Higgins and George, Lord Livingston, eldest son of the Earl of Linlithgow. The election was granted to Higgins not only because he obtained 'the plurality of the votes of the burgesses' but also because Livingston, as the eldest son of a peer, was incapable of representing a burgh - a decision perhaps influenced by the fact that Higgins was a staunch Presbyterian, while Livingston was a known Jacobite. Only four days after this decision, Livingston was hosting Viscount Dundee ('Bonnie Dundee') on his journey to Stirling after defying the Convention when it decided to support William rather than James II. Higgins' election can be seen as the embodiment of the 'Glorious Revolution', with Whig politics and Presbyterianism in Linlithgow joining forces to promote the election of the popular bourgeois candidate at the expense of the local aristocrat who supported the old regime. Less excitingly, his standing down on becoming a Presbyterian minister set a precedent for the idea that ordination disqualified a man for the service of the secular parliament. Perhaps Higgins' gift, undated, was a thank-you offering to his electors, and a handing over to them of a book from the political life he was renouncing on his ordination.
Shelfmark RB.m.683
Reference Sources Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; The Times Law Reports; Douglas, Basil William, Lord Daer. The right of the eldest sons of the peers of Scotland to represent the Commons of that part of Great Britain in Parliament, considered. [Edinburgh?], 1790; Records of the Parliaments of Scotland (http://www.rps.ac.uk/)
Acquired on 02/09/08
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