Important acquisitions

Observations on the means of exciting a spirit of national industry; chiefly intended to promote the agriculture, commerce, manufactures, and fisheries, of Scotland.

Author Anderson, James
Title Observations on the means of exciting a spirit of national industry; chiefly intended to promote the agriculture, commerce, manufactures, and fisheries, of Scotland.
Imprint Dublin : S. Price, W. and H. Whitestone,
Date of Publication 1779
Language English
Notes This is the first Irish printing of a work originally published in Edinburgh in 1777, which contains one of the earliest critiques of Adam Smith's recently-published "Wealth of nations". The author, James Anderson (1739-1808), was a landowner and farmer. As well as devoting himself to agricultural matters, Anderson also had a strong interest in the subject of political economy and published a large number of articles in newspapers, pamphlets and other people's publications, often using a pseudonym. In his lengthy preface to this work, he reveals that he had considered remaining anonymous but thought that it would be "a somewhat mean and disingenuous appearance to keep himself concealed". The work consists of a series of letters outlining his thoughts on the future of Scotland's economic output, with special reference to the economically depressed Highlands. Letter XIII in volume two of the "Observations" is largely devoted to arguments put forward in the "Wealth of nations". Anderson refers to Smith's "very ingenious treatise", before proceeding, very politely, to take serious issue with Smith's "entirely fallacious" thinking on aspects of Britain's Corn Laws. Smith had been critical of the existing legislation, which was designed to protect major English landholders by encouraging the export and limiting the import of corn when prices fell below a fixed point. Anderson the farmer and landowner preferred to defend the status quo. Anderson dedicated his work to the Duke of Buccleuch, a major landowner who took a keen interest in Scottish agriculture, but who also happened to be a former pupil and a patron of Adam Smith.
Shelfmark RB.s.2783-2784
Acquired on 30/04/10
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