Important acquisitions

The history of King Lear, a tragedy.

Author Nahum Tate
Title The history of King Lear, a tragedy.
Imprint Glasgow : Printed by William Duncan Junior,
Date of Publication 1756
Language English
Notes R. and A. Foulis had issued 'Lear' in 1753, using Pope's text, including it in their 'works' of 1766. They were following the literary tradition. William Duncan junior chose instead to publish Nahum Tate's adaptation, which was used for performances of the play. Another edition of Tate's version was issued in Glasgow, anonymously, in 1758. Tate's adaptation is not well regarded today. He axes the fool and gives the play a happy ending with Lear surviving to see Cordelia and Edgar marry. Addison disapproved but Dr. Johnson defended Tate's version and it seems to have been popular: the happy ending and exclusion of the weirder bits presumably ensured 'bums on seats'. Tate's version was the version of 'Lear' that audiences almost always saw, from the Restoration through to the Romantic period. It wasn't performed at all when George III began to suffer from mental health problems, and then, after his death, the literary original began to be used again.
Shelfmark AB.1.213.17
Reference Sources Bookseller's notes
Acquired on 02/11/12
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