Important acquisitions

Extracts from lectures on phrenology: delivered to the Hampshire Phrenological Society, Portsmouth, in 1834. + Testimonials in favour of James Scott.

Author Scott, James
Title Extracts from lectures on phrenology: delivered to the Hampshire Phrenological Society, Portsmouth, in 1834. + Testimonials in favour of James Scott.
Imprint Gosport: J. Hammond
Date of Publication 1838
Language English
Notes This volume contains three works, presumably printed for the author James Scott (1785-1860), on the occasion of his application for the post of superintendent physician at the Middlesex Lunatic Asylum. It contains two copies of his "Extracts from lectures on phrenology" as well as 63 pages of lengthy testimonials from colleagues. Scott was a Shetlander, born in Sandness on the Mainland. In 1803 he joined the Navy, seeing action in the Napoleonic Wars. He continued to serve after the Wars as a ship's surgeon, with a spell studying medicine on half-pay at the University of Paris. In 1826 he was appointed lecturer to the Royal Navy Hospital at Haslar at Gosport in Hampshire, and became curator of its medical museum. Scott was an influential supporter of phrenology in mental health diagnosis and treatment. By the time of these publications he was principal of the lunatic asylum at Haslar. The extracts from his lectures cover a wide range of topics from the development of phrenology, the philosophy of the mind and treatment of individual cases during his time at Haslar. In 1829 he met Sir Walter Scott, which took place around the time when the latter was preparing a new revised edition of his Shetland-based novel "The Pirate", for the 'Magnum Opus' edition of Scott's novels. The two men subsequently corresponded, with James Scott providing for the novelist a transcription of an account of the Sword Dance of Papa Stour. Walter Scott makes an appearance in "Extracts" in the section devoted to cranial dissection. In a long footnote on pp. 40-41 James Scott discusses the dissection of the author's brain. Quite what Walter Scott, who during his lifetime was dismissive of phrenology, would have made of this is another matter. Despite James Scott's impressive C.V. and breadth of learning he was unsuccessful in his application for the job in Middlesex. This particular volume appears to have been a family copy, containing his bookplate bearing his initials and the family motto 'Doe weell and let them say'.
Shelfmark AB.1.213.30(1-3)
Reference Sources http://shetlopedia.com/James_Scott_R.N.; Bookseller's notes
Acquired on 17/08/12
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