Important acquisitions

The coppy of a letter sent from the Earle of Traquere in Ireland the third of October 1641

Author Anon
Title The coppy of a letter sent from the Earle of Traquere in Ireland the third of October 1641
Imprint London: [s.n.]
Date of Publication 1641
Language English
Notes This is a rare pamphlet (5 other copies recorded in ESTC), printed in late 1641 as political and civil unrest were increasing in England and the rest of the British Isles as a prelude to the Civil War that broke out the following year. It is an attack on two prominent Scots of the period, John Stewart, first earl of Traquair (b. 1599-1659) and "Old Father Philips", Robert Philip(s), a Scottish Catholic priest based in King Charles's court in London. The pamphlet reproduces a letter, dated 3 October, 1641, supposedly written by Traquair from Dublin to Philip, which had been intercepted and the contents subsequently disclosed. By the beginning of October 1641, plans were well underway for armed uprising led by the Irish Catholic gentry against the English administration in Ireland. Armed revolt broke out later that month in various places in Ireland, resulting in the killing and expulsion of Protestant settlers in the north. In the letter Traquair reports on the plans for the uprising to Philip, the latter being described as "a loyall and constant friend to Rome". There is no evidence that Traquair was in Ireland at that time or had any role in the uprising. The printing of the pamphlet appears to be connected to the unpopularity of Traquair and Philip in Scotland and England. The former, as King Charles's man in Scotland, had found himself in the impossible role of trying to reconcile covenanters to their monarch's autocratic rule while trying to implement his episcopalian policies. In 1641 the Scottish parliament forced the king to remove him as lord high treasurer of Scotland, subsequently denouncing him as one of five principal 'incendiaries' in the country. Traquair, although a Protestant, was also thought to have Catholic sympathies, which would later, in 1644, lead the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland to declare him an 'enemy to religion'. Robert Philip (c.15801647) was a prominent member of King Charles's royal household, acting as chaplain and confessor to the queen and as informal head of a group of Scottish Catholic nobles at the court. In 1640 he was accused by the English parliament of leading a popish conspiracy at court and influencing young Prince Charles towards popery. The House of Lords also wanted him to answer charges of inciting rebellion in Ireland. He was subsequently imprisoned in the Tower of London for a year which left him easy prey for attacks such as this pamphlet. As with Traquair, there is no evidence that Philip was involved in fomenting discord in Ireland.
Shelfmark RB.s.2861
Reference Sources Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Acquired on 24/05/13
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