Important acquisitions

Neuer brittischer Plutarch oder Leben und Charaktere beruehmter Britten.

Author Friedrich Wilhelm Gillet
Title Neuer brittischer Plutarch oder Leben und Charaktere beruehmter Britten.
Imprint Berlin: Friedrich Maurer
Date of Publication 1804
Language German
Notes First edition of a German-language collection of biographical sketches and anecdotes relating to famous Britons who had distinguished themselves during the French Revolutionary War. Among the 24 men described are the Scots Lord Duncan (Adam Duncan of Camperdown fame), Henry Dundas, Thomas Erskine, 1st baron Erskine, and Sir John Sinclair. The author was a German Lutheran minister (Ernst) Friedrich Wilhelm Gillet (1762-1829), who preached at the churches of Dorotheenstadt and Friedrichswerder in Berlin. Gillet was presumably a member of the large Huguenot community that had settled in the Berlin area in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. The work was intended as continuation of the popular English-language work by Thomas Mortimer "The British Plutarch; or, biographical entertainer" first published in London in 1762, which took as its inspiration the biographies of the ancient Greek author Plutarch of eminent Greek and Roman statesmen and generals. The book is illustrated with portraits of men it describes and has as its frontispiece an engraving of the wooden carving 'Tipu's tiger' (now held at the V&A Museum in London) which is mentioned at the end of the book in a series of anecdotes relating to Britain's war against Tipu Sahib, sultan of Mysore in South India. At the time of the book's publication (1804) Britain had resumed its war against France and its leader Napoleon, having been at war continuously with the French in the Revolutionary War from 1793 to 1802. Gillet adopts a relatively neutral tone in describing the eminent British; as a citizen of Berlin, the centre of Prussian power, he would have been aware that the Prussian king Friedrich Wilhelm III was at the time pursuing a policy of neutrality in the Napoleonic War. However, there is clearly an underlying admiration for the British in refusing to bow to France, which he describes as the most powerful nation in Europe, whilst at the same time expanding their empire in India. Prussia would eventually enter the war against Napoleon in 1806 and suffer a crushing defeat.
Shelfmark AB.2.214.37
Acquired on 13/07/14
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